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Author Topic: Full Timing and Traveling with a Stocked Liquer Cabnet, after all it's our Home  (Read 4430 times)

JudyJB

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Even if you COULD fit in all that booze, you need to remember that RVs are not homes.  The "house" part can get very hot while you are driving.  And it can get even hotter while parked while you go inside someplace for a meal or shopping.  In addition, the underneath storage bins can get even hotter because they do not get AC down there. 

I don't know about hard liquor, but I am certain beer is NOT meant to be stored beyond a certain temperature.  Wine also spoils very easily in the heat.  So you will need some sort of refrigeration for all of those barrels you are carrying.

My suggestion is to carry small amounts in an inside cabinet and to wrap those bottles in bubble wrap while on the road.  There are stores all over the U.S. that sell alcoholic beverages and bars along the way, as well.  If you are not willing to make these sacrifices, you are not really a traveler and would do better to stay home and off the roads for the rest of us. 
Full-timing for over five years in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N

Gary RV_Wizard

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Thanks for that update on Texas motorhome exemption wording. Glad to hear that official written regs are in place in at least a few places.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

LarsMac

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  • Larry and Margo With Ami the Chi-cha
A friend of mine keeps a decent stock of liquor in his RV. It is in a locked cabinet. That cabinet is only unlocked when he is docked. To date, he has never had any trouble, even on a venture through Ontario and Quebec.

2000 Itasca Sundancer 430V
2007 Saturn Vue

If you lose your sense of humor, it's just not funny anymore. - Wavy Gravy

Russ+Chris

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Just to be on the safe side. I would not have any open containers while driving in the MH. No passengers drinking either. I keep my 3 liter barrel of moonshine in it's own cooler when traveling.
 
Russ and Chris (Both retired)
Jake, the furry kid. (Golden) Cooper RIP
Brownsville Pa.
'09 Fleetwood Discovery 40X  350HP DP
'13 Jeep Grand Cherokee TrailHawk Toad
'11 Nismo Track Car
'08 Power Wagon Off Road Beast
'07 Honda VFR

Past;
'14 Bounder 36R Gas (The Wobbly Goblin)
'11 Outback 277RL

Dragginourbedaround

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  • I look out the window and see trees, I'm camping
Here is a link to the laws of the 50 states about alcohol in a vehicle:  http://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-services-and-commerce/open-container-and-consumption-statutes.aspx

In general it is OK to have alcoholic beverages inside a motorhome, but not in the driver area, or consumed while driving, even by passengers sometimes.

I stopped reading after Florida, because as AStravelers noted there are exemptions for motorhomes, just not in the driver or passenger seats.
Gene

2013 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2011 Honda Fit

GA_Boy

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OP, were you actually serious with those questions?
Marvin

---nota___

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Thanks for all the responses from everyone,

Beaver Biscuits !!!

Guess I'll have to shrink the barrel size to a few liters in size and give up on pumping to the inside of the coach.

I'll just put all the pretty unopened aged liquor bottles in the Lighted Liquor Cabinet and stash the open bottles in the basement cooler while traveling.

 Thanks Again
Edit: Removed white space.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 07:51:33 AM by Tom »

---nota___

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Even if you COULD fit in all that booze, you need to remember that RVs are not homes.  The "house" part can get very hot while you are driving.  And it can get even hotter while parked while you go inside someplace for a meal or shopping.  In addition, the underneath storage bins can get even hotter because they do not get AC down there. 

I don't know about hard liquor, but I am certain beer is NOT meant to be stored beyond a certain temperature.  Wine also spoils very easily in the heat.  So you will need some sort of refrigeration for all of those barrels you are carrying.

My suggestion is to carry small amounts in an inside cabinet and to wrap those bottles in bubble wrap while on the road.  There are stores all over the U.S. that sell alcoholic beverages and bars along the way, as well.  If you are not willing to make these sacrifices, you are not really a traveler and would do better to stay home and off the roads for the rest of us.

 Thanks for the advice on the bubble wrapping the bottles while traveling.

 We intend to purchase a high end unit with basement AC&Heat and could care less how long our generator runs to keep us comfortable.

 My oldest son and nephew sell navigation equipment and install wind & solar power systems on huge sailing vessels. We plan to add as much solar power as possible to our coach as it will be our Home on Wheels until we get board of land.

AStravelers

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  • Part time travelers, 4-8 months each year.
Thanks for the advice on the bubble wrapping the bottles while traveling.

 We intend to purchase a high end unit with basement AC&Heat and could care less how long our generator runs to keep us comfortable.

 My oldest son and nephew sell navigation equipment and install wind & solar power systems on huge sailing vessels. We plan to add as much solar power as possible to our coach as it will be our Home on Wheels until we get board of land.
While you may not care how long you need to run your generator, just don't park within 200 yards of your neighbor if/when you boondock.  There is little which makes those of us who boondock out in the boondocks than to have some @#$% person pull up 20 yards away from this very nice quite place we are parked at and then proceed to crank up "their nice quiet generator" and sit inside. 

Doing the same in BLM and NF campgrounds really makes you neighbors mad as well.
Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado 4X4

http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/

Dragginourbedaround

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  • I look out the window and see trees, I'm camping
While you may not care how long you need to run your generator, just don't park within 200 yards of your neighbor if/when you boondock.  There is little which makes those of us who boondock out in the boondocks than to have some @#$% person pull up 20 yards away from this very nice quite place we are parked at and then proceed to crank up "their nice quiet generator" and sit inside. 

Doing the same in BLM and NF campgrounds really makes you neighbors mad as well.
Unfortunately I am not lucky enough to be able to boondock without running my Genny. So far no one has complained. I don't park 20 yards from the next camper, but I'm not camping 200 yards away if there isn't space. Especially if I'm boondocking in the boondocks. You must be one of those lucky people that never has to run their generator.  Batteries never run down. Have enough solar to run a/c, microwave etc.
Gene

2013 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2011 Honda Fit

OLDRACER

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If you cannot get along with a couple hours of generator a day, at mid day when it should not be a bother, you are not boon docking, you have merely moved your condo out into the woods.

We had people move in with a rented MH right next to us on the beach in Alaska, and proceeded  to run the generator all day to play video games. We packed up and moved 1/4 mile down the beach to escape them.

They asked why we were moving, so we told them! Nicely, of course, since they did not seem to have a clue!

« Last Edit: December 08, 2016, 08:55:45 AM by OLDRACER »

AStravelers

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  • Part time travelers, 4-8 months each year.
Unfortunately I am not lucky enough to be able to boondock without running my Genny. So far no one has complained. I don't park 20 yards from the next camper, but I'm not camping 200 yards away if there isn't space. Especially if I'm boondocking in the boondocks. You must be one of those lucky people that never has to run their generator.  Batteries never run down. Have enough solar to run a/c, microwave etc.
Why are you out in the boondocks spending $20-$35 a day on fuel to run your air conditioner, trying to conserve water and conserving so as not to fill your holding tanks, while sitting inside your RV.  You could be in an RV park with all the elect, water and sewer you could want for almost the same price.  Not to mention the wear and tear on the generator.  Also not to mention disturbing your neighbors.

Just because no one complains, doesn't mean you are NOT bothering your neighbors.  The gist of your posts seem to indicate you haven't thought about disturbing your neighbors until I brought up the topic.  Many or most people boondock to enjoy the peace and quite of the outdoors, and really prefer to NOT hear a generator.

And, yes I do have enough solar and batteries to not need to run my generator unless I have to run the air conditioner.  However IF I have to run the AC then I am not in a place I really want boondock. Sitting in the RV with the AC on is not what we like to do.  We will either go to an RV park or move to a place which is cooler. 
Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado 4X4

http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/

Dragginourbedaround

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  • I look out the window and see trees, I'm camping
Why are you out in the boondocks spending $20-$35 a day on fuel to run your air conditioner, trying to conserve water and conserving so as not to fill your holding tanks, while sitting inside your RV.  You could be in an RV park with all the elect, water and sewer you could want for almost the same price.  Not to mention the wear and tear on the generator.  Also not to mention disturbing your neighbors.

Just because no one complains, doesn't mean you are NOT bothering your neighbors.  The gist of your posts seem to indicate you haven't thought about disturbing your neighbors until I brought up the topic.  Many or most people boondock to enjoy the peace and quite of the outdoors, and really prefer to NOT hear a generator.

And, yes I do have enough solar and batteries to not need to run my generator unless I have to run the air conditioner.  However IF I have to run the AC then I am not in a place I really want boondock. Sitting in the RV with the AC on is not what we like to do.  We will either go to an RV park or move to a place which is cooler.

What I'm doing when I boondock or how I boondock is none of your business. In order for me to spend up to $35 a day on fuel I would have to be running my generator 12 or more hours a day, and I don't. I don't boondock enough to warrant loading up on solar and batteries, but that doesn't mean I can't enjoy camping off road occasionally. People boondock for many reasons, not just for the peace and quiet.
There is always someone trying to tell the rest of us how to live our lives.
Gene

2013 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2011 Honda Fit

OLDRACER

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THAT brings up one of the best points of an RV, it has wheels and if the neighborhood goes downhill you can move!

---nota___

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THAT brings up one of the best points of an RV, it has wheels and if the neighborhood goes downhill you can move!

 We won't be chasing the 100 degree weather as we like it in the 70's to 80's and Love the fresh air. However if it gets too Hot those AC units will be a singing their song.

 The OldRacer has the Best quote of the Boon docking noise debate. 



 We all have wheels and those with brains know how to use them.

 

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