EPDM Coatings
Airlift Company RV LED Bulbs offer rvupgradestore.com ARPC LLC Composet Products Roadswap PO Box Zone

Author Topic: Sub-panel  (Read 209 times)

Nastones

  • ---
  • Posts: 17
Sub-panel
« on: January 09, 2017, 05:08:35 PM »
I guess this falls in the category a dumb question is an UN asked question. Is wiring a AC sub panel in a RV the same as wiring a sub panel in a  residential home.
P.W. Swallow
Federal LawEnforcement / USANG (Ret)

Rene T

  • ---
  • Posts: 7996
  • Great being on the right side of the grass
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2017, 05:20:05 PM »
I guess this falls in the category a dumb question is an UN asked question. Is wiring a AC sub panel in a RV the same as wiring a sub panel in a  residential home.

It's not a dumb question if you don't know the answer.
Yes, the wiring it is basically the same as a home.
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

SeilerBird

  • ---
  • Posts: 9218
  • Everything I state is my opinion.
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2017, 05:23:41 PM »
I guess this falls in the category a dumb question is an UN asked question. Is wiring a AC sub panel in a RV the same as wiring a sub panel in a  residential home.
Theoretically yes. You put a breaker into the main panel that has enough amperage to protect the wire that runs between the panels. E.G. If you want a 30 amp sub panel then run a ten gauge feeder wire. You can run as many circuits as you wish from the sub panel providing they are not larger than 30 amps. You could run a dozen 20 amp circuits from the sub panel but you will still be limited to only getting 30 amps total out of the sub panel across all the circuits.
Tom Seiler & 3 mountain lions: Tarzan, Jane and Cleopatra
2016 photos:
https://goo.gl/photos/aXQPbnVpgzNvs4Jq8
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

Gary [ RVer Emeritus]

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 56661
  • Home is Ocala, FL
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2017, 05:30:49 PM »
Yes. The entire RV system is considered to be a subpanel that receives its power from yet another sub-panel, i.e. the power post on the campsite. If you want to add another subpanel to the RV, the rules are the same.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

tvman44

  • ---
  • Posts: 1606
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2017, 05:35:05 PM »
Yes the same rules apply.

robertusa123

  • ---
  • Posts: 1378
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2017, 08:33:58 AM »
More or less.    What you doing and why
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

Lou Schneider

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 6682
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2017, 12:33:24 PM »
Yes and no.  Ground and neutral stay separate in the RV panel, just like any other subpanel.  An RV panel also includes a main breaker to allow you to disconnect power at the panel and to act as secondary protection for the incoming power, either 30 amps or 50 amps.

The reason for the input breaker is to protect the power cord in case the source you plug into doesn't have the proper size circuit breaker, such as using an adapter to plug a 30 amp cord into a 50 amp shore socket.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2017, 12:38:19 PM by Lou Schneider »

Nastones

  • ---
  • Posts: 17
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2017, 02:19:21 PM »
@ robertusa123, I am putting a 3 Circuit sub-panel in my RV for a 3000w inverter.
P.W. Swallow
Federal LawEnforcement / USANG (Ret)

robertusa123

  • ---
  • Posts: 1378
Re: Sub-panel
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2017, 05:55:46 PM »
I don't see a problem.    Over kill.never hurts
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

 

Hosted by Over The Network