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Author Topic: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others  (Read 3986 times)

docj

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #30 on: February 01, 2017, 07:47:14 AM »


AT&T (owner of Direct TV) has announced plans to phase out satellites and boxes (see link below) in favor of streaming over the cellular network. 

Although AT&T has stated that streaming will be its "primary" distribution platform by 2020, no timetable for phase out of the satellites has been given nor has a definite statement been made that the satellites will ever be phased out.  At present AT&T has millions of satellite customers and quite a few of them live in areas not well served by cellular.  Furthermore, the so-called unlimited cellular offered by AT&T for streaming TV is, I believe, limited to 480p resolution.  Not something I would want to watch on my new UHD TV.

IMHO most of us will be able to live out our years as RVers without having to worry about DirecTV phasing out its satellite service.
Sandie & Joel

2000 40' Beaver Patriot Thunder Princeton--425 HP/1550 ft-lbs CAT C-12
2014 Honda CR-V AWD EX-L with ReadyBrute tow bar/braking system
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sadixon49

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2017, 08:17:16 AM »
Although AT&T has stated that streaming will be its "primary" distribution platform by 2020, no timetable for phase out of the satellites has been given nor has a definite statement been made that the satellites will ever be phased out.  At present AT&T has millions of satellite customers and quite a few of them live in areas not well served by cellular.  Furthermore, the so-called unlimited cellular offered by AT&T for streaming TV is, I believe, limited to 480p resolution.  Not something I would want to watch on my new UHD TV.

IMHO most of us will be able to live out our years as RVers without having to worry about DirecTV phasing out its satellite service.

I think you are correct. My plan is to buy a SWM antenna with an HDDVR receiver and go camping. If, and it's a big if, ATT decides to pull the plug on satellites in 2020, then I won't have a large investment in a tracking antenna, and will simply write it off. In the mean time I will have decent TV, and will enjoy what I get.
steve
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2017, 09:28:24 AM »
Quote
AT&T (owner of Direct TV) has announced plans to phase out satellites and boxes (see link below) in favor of streaming over the cellular network.

That's not quite what they said. What they will be phasing out is broadcast tv via satellite and the associated receiver boxes, replacing it with streaming via various delivery channels, including satellite as well as cellular and cable. Direct TV will become a streaming service, probably not much different than Netflix or Hulu. My guess is there will be a new crop of DirectTV satellite receivers that do streaming instead of real time tv reception.
Gary
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Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

docj

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2017, 05:22:17 PM »
My guess is there will be a new crop of DirectTV satellite receivers that do streaming instead of real time tv reception.

A problem with that approach is that using satellites for streaming essentially means that a 2-way communication system has to be established so the "server" knows what you want to watch.  The satellite TV system, as currently configured, is a one-way communication system.  No information is returned from the satellite receiver to the transmitting satellite or ground station.  Satellite internet systems, such as those provided by Hughesnet, require a much larger "ground station" with the capability of transmitting a signal back to the satellite in geosynchronous orbit.

It would, in theory, be possible to create a hybrid system which involved the use of a one-way satellite downlink along with the use of a separate uplink using, for example, the cellular network.  At one time there were Hughesnet options that sort of worked in that manner.

Personally, I'm not convinced that's the way AT&T will go.  As currently designed the satellite broadcast system can provide HD or even 4k signals to millions of subscribers because there is no "feedback" and all customers simply select from a fixed "menu" of channels.  If, however, each customer is allowed to specify his own information content the bandwidth will be nowhere near adequate to satisfy the same number of subscribers.
Sandie & Joel

2000 40' Beaver Patriot Thunder Princeton--425 HP/1550 ft-lbs CAT C-12
2014 Honda CR-V AWD EX-L with ReadyBrute tow bar/braking system
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JFN

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2017, 07:24:37 PM »
The solution I am looking at is to off my Dish receiver and Tailgater and use my phone streaming Netflix, Hulu, and Sling TV to the Chromecast dongle on the TV along with DVD's and over the air antenna for locals. If that does not work then I'll read a book. The Dish RV month by months service is now $75 and the other options are $32, but I already use them at home.
John & Connie Neal
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RobReab

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #35 on: February 08, 2017, 03:56:39 PM »
Can't speak for the Pi.

Most commercial cast devices (I think the MS Display adapter is about the only one that doesn't) require an internet connection to cast your phone to your TV. Make sure you have an internet connection for the cast device.

If your phone can do Wi-Fi and Cell at the same time.. You can "Cast" it to your TV.

There are several ways to do this.. If it can suport USB and Wireless" (Cellular) at the same time, there are even more ways.. The tastiest of which is Raspberry Pi.
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NY_Dutch

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #36 on: February 08, 2017, 05:32:16 PM »
A problem with that approach is that using satellites for streaming essentially means that a 2-way communication system has to be established so the "server" knows what you want to watch.  The satellite TV system, as currently configured, is a one-way communication system.  No information is returned from the satellite receiver to the transmitting satellite or ground station.  Satellite internet systems, such as those provided by Hughesnet, require a much larger "ground station" with the capability of transmitting a signal back to the satellite in geosynchronous orbit.

It would, in theory, be possible to create a hybrid system which involved the use of a one-way satellite downlink along with the use of a separate uplink using, for example, the cellular network.  At one time there were Hughesnet options that sort of worked in that manner.

Personally, I'm not convinced that's the way AT&T will go.  As currently designed the satellite broadcast system can provide HD or even 4k signals to millions of subscribers because there is no "feedback" and all customers simply select from a fixed "menu" of channels.  If, however, each customer is allowed to specify his own information content the bandwidth will be nowhere near adequate to satisfy the same number of subscribers.

Our Dish Hoppers can stream Netflix, Pandora, etc, but they need an Internet connection to do it.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

docj

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2017, 06:30:20 PM »
Our Dish Hoppers can stream Netflix, Pandora, etc, but they need an Internet connection to do it.

I assume you understand that when you do this your Dish Hopper isn't really doing anything other than being a streaming device.  You could just as easily use a Roku or other similar streaming device.  It's not as if your ability to get this content has ANYTHING to do with the satellite TV system.
Sandie & Joel

2000 40' Beaver Patriot Thunder Princeton--425 HP/1550 ft-lbs CAT C-12
2014 Honda CR-V AWD EX-L with ReadyBrute tow bar/braking system
WiFiRanger Ambassador/RVParkReviews administrator
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NY_Dutch

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #38 on: February 08, 2017, 07:12:06 PM »
I assume you understand that when you do this your Dish Hopper isn't really doing anything other than being a streaming device.  You could just as easily use a Roku or other similar streaming device.  It's not as if your ability to get this content has ANYTHING to do with the satellite TV system.

Exactly... The only advantage is the "everything in one box" concept. I don't see either Dish or Direct using their existing satellites to on demand stream any content even with a hybrid setup, assuming the transponders could be reconfigured for such a service. The bandwidth just isn't there.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

docj

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #39 on: February 09, 2017, 10:36:29 AM »
Needing any kind of device for streaming is becoming less and less of an issue as new TVs become smarter and smarter.  Our new 43" middle of the pack UHD Samsung has such broad range of "smart" capabilities that there was no reason for me to use a Roku or a Hopper or anything else with it to access internet related activities such as streaming.  A few years ago, most smart devices had only a few built-in streaming options; that is very different now.
Sandie & Joel

2000 40' Beaver Patriot Thunder Princeton--425 HP/1550 ft-lbs CAT C-12
2014 Honda CR-V AWD EX-L with ReadyBrute tow bar/braking system
WiFiRanger Ambassador/RVParkReviews administrator
Follow our adventures on Facebook at www.facebook.com/weisstravels.net

JFN

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Re: To satelite, or not to satelite, that is the question. With a few others
« Reply #40 on: February 09, 2017, 11:08:52 AM »
I have a 55" Visio 4k in the house and the wireless in the tv is less than perfect, so I use the existing ROKU I had. Didn't check if I mentioned it or not but I am using ChromeCast on the RV tube for streaming from my phone.

John
John & Connie Neal
2006 Dodge 2500 5.9, PacBrake
Smarty Jr Tuned
2006 KZ 29.5' Durango
MaxBrake, Brake Controller
Pressure Pro TPMS
K6JFN

 

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