EPDM Coatings
rvupgradestore.com Composet Products PO Box Zone
Over The Network Custom Yacht Interiors

Author Topic: Tire wear  (Read 586 times)

bobbyg2013

  • ---
  • Posts: 112
Tire wear
« on: February 13, 2017, 09:21:48 PM »
Excessive tire wear on the outside suggests a need for an axle alignment. Is $380 reasonable. Are there other ways I should consider. I have a 2015 26' TT with less than 10K miles on tires and unit. What say you fellow RV owners.

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 60421
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2017, 08:10:43 AM »
Is this on the trailer tires?  If so, they are going to have to bend the axles to fix that, so that price is in the ball park.  Is that price direct from a truck alignment shop, or from an RV dealer? Few Rv dealers have the equipment to do that sort of adjustment, so they would probably just take it to a shop anyway. Cut out the middleman and you might save $100 or so
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

KandT

  • ---
  • Posts: 743
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2017, 06:34:12 PM »
Have you had the crown nut and bearings checked?
2005 Winnebago Vectra
American Car Dolly
2009 Accord Toad
It's not a problem.  It's a project!

bobbyg2013

  • ---
  • Posts: 112
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2017, 11:44:11 AM »
to Kandt: no I have not. don't they do that when they do the grease?

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 60421
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2017, 12:30:51 PM »
Probably not, but I wouldn't expect bearing wear on a 2015 with 10k miles either. It could happen, though.

Wear on the outer edges typically means the tires are slanted in at the bottom, like this:  \ /  so that they wear on the outer edges. More often it's the inner edges that do this, which would mean an axle bent down from overload or a bad bump, but an axle bent the opposite way wears the outer edges. In either case, that is a wheel camber problem.  However, it is conceivable that the tires are slanted by toe-in rather than camber. Not common on a fixed axle like that, but not quite impossible either.
 
« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 12:36:57 PM by Gary RVer Emeritus »
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

bobbyg2013

  • ---
  • Posts: 112
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2017, 11:34:49 AM »
Gary: what would you suggest I do? Alignment? Just keep an eye on it? Rotate tires?

regval

  • ---
  • Posts: 192
Re: Tire wear
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2017, 02:01:39 PM »
Just curious...are your axles torsion or spring?  Both types are used on Travel Trailers and torsion axles can not normally be repaired or adjusted.
2005 Forest River TT 27BHSS and 2009 Heartland Sundance 2998RB 5vr
2007 Chev Silverado 2500HD WT crew cab, LB, 6.6L, Allison 6sp, B&W Companion Hitch
Retired Biomedical Engineer
Lawrenceville, GA

"Some come to the fountain of knowledge to drink, others just gargle."

 

Hosted by Over The Network