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Author Topic: Wheel size upgrade??  (Read 525 times)

ander12

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Wheel size upgrade??
« on: February 17, 2017, 01:55:47 PM »
We have a 2011 Evergreen Everlite 32MKS and are getting ready for the season with new bearings, brakes and tires. We were wondering if anyone has changed their 14" tires and wheels up to 15". We are looking for a lil more height and better ride. Has anyone done this and what is your experience with handling afterwards? Tires are not much different and it would be around $400 for the new wheels so a feasible amount!

Thanks in advance!!

Andy and Kathy

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Wheel size upgrade??
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 11:19:06 AM »
The trailer will be a bit taller, but the extra 1" probably isn't enough to make it noticeably more top heavy. Just make sure the load capacity of the 15" tires is at least as great as the ones you replace. Given that OEM trailer tires are often barely adequate, an increase in load capacity (weight rating) would probably be even better.
Gary
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Rene T

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Re: Wheel size upgrade??
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2017, 12:39:52 PM »
Also, make sure you'll have the clearance between the top of the tires and the wheel well. I don't know how much bigger the tires will be but you have to check that out. If you give us the old and the new sizes, someone here should be able to figure that out. Maybe also need the manufacturers.
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2kGeorgieBoy

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Re: Wheel size upgrade??
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2017, 10:40:41 PM »
A quick search online for "tire size comparison" should list some sites where you can plug in the 2 tires and get the dimensions of both tires so you can compare them.
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Stephen S.

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Re: Wheel size upgrade??
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2017, 09:34:48 AM »
Lots of custom car enthusiests change rim & tire sizes for unique looks. If you go up in rim diameter and down in profile height you can end up at the same overall diameter, net gain/loss zero. 22" with ultra low profile are popular for some reason.

So another way to gain height is to keep the rims, but increase the profile height on the tires.

All kinds of mods you can do with rim & tire sizes. You need to find a shop that doesn't insist on going by the book.

As noted, just make sure the speed and weight limits on the tires are enough for the job.
Stephen S.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Wheel size upgrade??
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2017, 09:45:02 AM »
Stephen makes a good point about tire profile. If you now have a 70 or 75 profile tire, you can gain height & circumference without changing the wheels simply by moving to an 80 or 85 profile tire. Increasing the width also has the side effect of increasing circumference and height, and reducing revs/mile. A 235/80R14, for example, is a slightly taller tire than a 225/80R14 and has a larger rolling radius. Use one of the online tire size comparison sites to see what changes get you the most of what you are seeking.

https://tiresize.com/comparison/

I am doubtful, though, that any modest change like that, or the 1" wheel diameter increase, is going to have any appreciable effect on "ride". A tire with a higher section width ratio does have a bit more flex, but we aren't talking night & day difference. If you are hoping to smooth out the trailer bounce somewhat, adding shock absorbers would be a better investment (most trailers do not have shocks as standard equipment). Or change axles to the Mor/Ryde rubber shear suspension.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 09:48:46 AM by Gary RVer Emeritus »
Gary
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