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Author Topic: Wacky Internet access problem  (Read 1772 times)

SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2017, 07:08:51 PM »
Thanks Larry, I really don't need much speed. I am not a gamer and I don't download large files. So long as I can stream I will be OK. CL offers speeds up to 1 gig so if 10 mps is not fast enough I will upgrade.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

Molaker

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2017, 07:44:32 PM »
Thanks Larry, I really don't need much speed. I am not a gamer and I don't download large files. So long as I can stream I will be OK. CL offers speeds up to 1 gig so if 10 mps is not fast enough I will upgrade.
24 Mbps is about tops for ADSL (faster than DSL), so if CenturyLink is quoting up to 1 Gbps, that "salesman" is blowing smoke up your...ahhh...shirt sleeve again.  Even fiber opitical service maxes out with Google Fiber at 350 Mbps (data from Aug 2016 - most cable services are less than 50 Mbps).  But, I agree, 10 Mbps should meet your needs.  I get close to 24 Mbps which is fine even with several computers connected.
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2017, 08:57:06 PM »
Nope no salesman is blowing smoke. I am quoting their website.

http://www.centurylink.com/home/internet/#CTAM
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

NY_Dutch

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2017, 09:31:30 PM »
I expect the "selected areas" where CL offers 1GB speeds are only those areas where they have fiber available, but you're right, they do offer it.
Dutch
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SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2017, 04:58:45 AM »
1 gig blows my mind. My first modem in the 80s was 2400 and I though it was screaming because it was twice as fast as a 1200. :o
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

Lou Schneider

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2017, 05:31:08 AM »
USB 2.0 only transfers at 480 Mbps so a 1 Gbps modem sends data twice as fast as a USB 2.0 link.  Of course, USB 3.0 can transfer up to 5Gbps.

NY_Dutch

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #36 on: May 28, 2017, 07:19:25 AM »
In 1984, I was working as a field specialist for a Massachusetts computer aided design system manufacturer. The company supplied me with a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model 100 portable PC, a very early "laptop" with an 8-line display and built in keyboard. It was used to keep track of my parts inventory, order parts, and log my service calls. Each evening I would connect to a landline phone line, sometimes using a couple of safety pins stuck through the hotel phone wiring and alligator clips if there was no wall jack. The built in 300 baud modem would then send my updated info to the home office, a process that could take 20-30 minutes, and all to often had to be repeated 2 or 3 times before I got a positive acknowledgement back. Even at today's slowest speeds, the amount of data involved would only take a few seconds to transfer at most.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

Tom

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #37 on: May 28, 2017, 07:36:18 AM »
I too recall my first 300 baud modem in the early 80's.


Some time in the mid 80's we stayed at a B&B in the UK. Downstairs was a regular village pub and upstairs were 6 guest rooms. The only phone jack in the building was behind the bar, and I'd pre-arranged with the landlord that I could use it as a condition of our stay. Popped the RadioShack laptop (aka luggable) computer on the bar, plugged in a length of phone cord and a BT/RJ phone adapter, and was online, albeit very slow. I had an audience of pub regulars, pints (of beer) in hand, looking over my shoulder and they were able to read the stuff scrolling across the screen. I don't think any of them had seen a computer before, and there were lots of oohs and ahhs. Nowadays, I doubt there's a house in that village that doesn't have broadband.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2017, 09:59:10 AM by Tom »
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Alfa38User

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2017, 11:00:30 AM »
DSL can be as fast a cable these days. Larry is right though, in the earlier days, DSL was quite a bit slower. As Larry found out, telephone cables are not run in short paths as "the bird flies". I was located at the end limit of my Nortel DSL modem's ability at the time and the service was not much better than dial-up except you did not block the telephone line when using it. Today however, with digital switching, the effective distance to a Central Office is very short by virtue of remote line modules (DRLM). Today, using the same old outside cable and pairs, I have Fiber Optic service to the terminal, the old cable to the house and 25 Mbps service.

Fiber Optic to the home has not yet arrived here but it won't be long....
They are offering the service but it will likely still be "fiber to the terminal" and includes TV, Internet phone and internet service. No cables have been added to the run outside in the 40 years+ I have lived here. (Old career Telephone Man!!! ;) )
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
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"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

UTTransplant

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2017, 11:35:39 AM »
You folks are bringing back memories. I used the old fashioned telephone coupler modems at 300 baud right around 1980, and was thrilled when 1200 baud modems came out. Our first home computer was a Heathkit CPM machine with a floppy and 64K memory. We were both using main frames and the old mini computers in the mid to late 70s - mostly IBM, Digital's PDP and Vax systems. Life has come a long way. The deep embedded real-time systems I used to develop are all gone, and I am strictly a user focused on having a good user interface.

Fun walk down memory lane!
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Tom

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #40 on: May 28, 2017, 11:43:49 AM »
Quote
CPM machine with a floppy ... in the mid to late 70s - mostly IBM, Digital's PDP and Vax systems.

Definitely a walk down memory lane  ;D
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Molaker

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #41 on: May 28, 2017, 12:29:48 PM »
You folks are bringing back memories. I used the old fashioned telephone coupler modems at 300 baud right around 1980, and was thrilled when 1200 baud modems came out. Our first home computer was a Heathkit CPM machine with a floppy and 64K memory. We were both using main frames and the old mini computers in the mid to late 70s - mostly IBM, Digital's PDP and Vax systems. Life has come a long way. The deep embedded real-time systems I used to develop are all gone, and I am strictly a user focused on having a good user interface.

Fun walk down memory lane!
Alas, my first computer was a Commodore Vic 20 with no floppy, no modem with only 5K RAM.  I used a cassette tape recorder for external storage and a 300 baud modem.  Then upgraded to a Commodore 64 with an external floppy drive and a 1200 baud modem.  Next I went to a Commodore 128 and, my 1st break into "PC", a ZDS 286 followed by a Gateway 386, all the time trying to learn DOS and Basic.  I wrote my 1st real Basic program while working for Zenith Radio Corp in around 1982 or 83 that made setting up consistent color tracking on ZDS color monitors and Brunswick bowling alley twin monitors (really tricky to make colors match on 2 monitors side-by-side).
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #42 on: May 28, 2017, 01:14:41 PM »
My first "computer" was an Atari 800. It came with 32k of RAM, but being the power user I was I opted for the 16k memory upgrade for $599. And now one gig flash is under two dollars.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

kdbgoat

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #43 on: May 28, 2017, 04:34:25 PM »
My first was an Atari 800XL. 64k, 256 colors, way better than a Commodore 64. I sold it used to a friend with a 13" color tv, floppy disk, cassette tape drive, and a daisy wheel printer for a bargain basement price of $700.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
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Arch Hoagland

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #44 on: May 28, 2017, 05:00:37 PM »
Aren't computers fun?
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SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #45 on: May 28, 2017, 05:37:19 PM »
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

Alfa38User

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #46 on: May 29, 2017, 05:45:39 PM »
My first was an Apple II plus CLONE, 64K (Real Apples were 48K at the time) using Apple Dos as the operating system. I added an 80 column card for a better screen output, two outboard floppy drives and an Apple thermal printer. Learned a lot on that machine by copying several pre-written software programs in Basic from magazines that were very popular at the time. Learned to write in Basic myself and that came in very handy at work where I had access to timeshare machines. Time frame: late 1977 or so. (Had worked the 7 prior years as a tech in the first electronic telephone switches (#1 ESS),  used in North America, so I had a good idea how computers actually worked and were programmed.)

"Addicting" describes it perfectly....
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 05:49:06 PM by Alfa38User »
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
Alfa Gold 38 (2000) 5ver (parked!)

"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

8Muddypaws

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #47 on: May 29, 2017, 06:54:57 PM »
My first computer was an IBM 360/40.  Well, not really mine, they paid me about $500 a month to play with it.  I worked in a fishbowl computer room on the ground floor of a downtown office building.  All day long there were noses pressed against the windows watching every move we made because 'those damn computers are going to take over the world'.  How right they were!  Very few people don't own at least one computer.

Retired computer professional
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Tom

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #48 on: May 29, 2017, 07:10:35 PM »
Quote
there were noses pressed against the windows watching every move we made ...

Used to see the same thing with our "tech shop" at a steel plant. A clean environment working on the increasing automation. We used to make "fish in a fish bowl" faces at them (the gazers) and pretended to swim.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2017, 11:36:21 AM by Tom »
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Molaker

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #49 on: May 29, 2017, 07:14:22 PM »
Okay, my 1st computer was an analog CP-66 as part of the US Navy's A3D Skywarrior ASB-1 bombing system.  I think it replaced the slidebacus (slide rule crossed with an abacus) in the mid '50s and was designed to allow a flight crew to loft (sling) a nuke waaay up in the air and roll out 180 degrees to turn tail and run before the big bright mushroom lit up the sky.  It weighed about 250 lbs and was roughly 18"x18"x36" in dimension.  It mounted at an angle in front of the BN (bombardier/navigator) with one end sticking up and functioning as the control panel.  This was early 60's and was soon replaced by the ASB-7 system with the Navy's 1st digital (sorta) computer.  It only weighed about 160 lbs and broke in two so a 130 lb sailor like me could carry one half and wrestle it up the chute into the cockpit.  Whew!  Now, you mainframe guys can brag about how much your computers weighed and how large they were, but you probably didn't have to carry yours up ladders and across a pitching flight deck.  ;D
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

Larry N.

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #50 on: May 30, 2017, 06:32:54 AM »
Well, if we're going to talk about computers we worked on, then my first one was the bombing/navigational system (Bomb/Nav) on B-47s. It was an analog computer using servo mechanisms, vacuum tubes, relays, etc. and could be tied to the autopilot for navigation or for the last portion of bomb runs. It even had a periscope that the navigator could use to set winds into the system for more accurate navigation (later models used doppler radar for that). The one we kept on a test bench for repairs took up the better part of a fair sized room, but on the aircraft parts of it were in the vertical fin, parts in the nose, and many other places on board.

My next computer was also analog, and HUGE -- it was AT&T's 4A switching machine, an acre or so of electro-mechanical devices that switched long distance calls. Towards the end of its useful life they added a digital computer (excuse me, that's Stored Program Control, since AT&T couldn't build computers, due to a consent decree) for the routing calculations (it could fit in your pocket today).
Larry and Mary Ann N.
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Alfa38User

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #51 on: May 30, 2017, 11:54:26 AM »
Snipped...

My next computer was also analog, and HUGE -- it was AT&T's 4A switching machine, an acre or so of electro-mechanical devices that switched long distance calls. Towards the end of its useful life they added a digital computer (excuse me, that's Stored Program Control, since AT&T couldn't build computers, due to a consent decree) for the routing calculations (it could fit in your pocket today).

I get that one!! I worked #5A XBar machines (with Centrex services) for 8 years or so myself!!! Local switching as opposed to long distance switching. That SPC operation was very similar to the #1 ESS 'translator function', as I understood it, but the ESS processors controlled all the switching, not just the routing. There were many #1ESS machines installed in the USA, built by Western Electric and later some #4ESS machines that replaced the 4A XBar switchers were used.

Both were probably developed by Bell Labs (AT&T ?), at Indian Hills (NJ). We also had them in our 4A machines as well.... Ours were built by Northern Electric from the original Bell Labs designs. In 1966 our first Montreal located #1ESS machine, (where I worked from 1972 on), was the first one in service in North America, simply because of the 3 hour time difference between Montreal and Los Angeles!!! (Telephone switches were always cut in or out of service at Midnight on any given day.)

SP1 ESS was developed later by Northern Electric (Nortel) in Canada. It was a hybrid that used a mechanical XBar type switch controlled by a processor and it replaced (inhibited) any further installations of #1 ESS at Bell Canada. We ended up with only 14 or so, including 2 military 4 wire machines.

It is said the a powerful laptop today has a lot more computing power than these big machines ever had but... they were certainly the beginning of an era. But, at least you could see and touch the transistors that made up the gates and processors. They were not hidden in those black centipedes we see  decorating today's circuit boards!!!


Ahhh, memories.....
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 12:30:07 PM by Alfa38User »
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
Alfa Gold 38 (2000) 5ver (parked!)

"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

Molaker

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #52 on: May 30, 2017, 01:58:13 PM »
But, at least you could see and touch the transistors that made up the gates and processors. They were not hidden in those black centipedes we see  decorating today's circuit boards!!!
Shhh!  Let's be more discrete about this. ::)
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

UTTransplant

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #53 on: May 30, 2017, 02:36:48 PM »
I worked mostly embedded systems, some commercial and some military. Some were critical safety of life systems too. To me, "computers" are things with operating systems. I seldom wrote code for computers. On my systems, I sometimes wrote the real-time executive (baby operating system) itself in assembly language. Oh, the days of 4K and 8K core memory! We even wrote code on bit-slice processors where you ganged up 4 bit machines to make 16 or 32 bit machines. You had to design and code very carefully to get the function to fit the memory and execution constraints.

I did occasionally write for computers, primarily numeric analysis tasks. One summer in grad school I ported a huge Fortran IV program originally written by a quantum mechanic (yes, really) to model hydrogen atom interaction. It was developed for an odd 60 bit numerical analysis specialty computer called a Cyber 60. I ported the code to a IBM 360 (the code could run only at night since it was so computationally intensive), a Prime computer, and a Vax. None came close to the performance of the Cyber, but with some manual fixed point scaling we got acceptable results running on the Vax in 64 bit mode. Lots of analysis work with the various numerical libraries to see which ones gave the best results. Nowadays this type of work is done on ganged multi-processor systems and probably take 20 seconds or less. Back then we would make runs of 12-24 hours. Much easier now.
Pam and Kevin plus Minou and Lily (the cats) plus Lexi (the grand-dog)
2014 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 240RKS
2015 Ram 2500 Diesel
http://toobusyforwork.com

Larry N.

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #54 on: June 01, 2017, 07:21:41 AM »
Shhh!  Let's be more discrete about this. ::)

 :o ::) ;D ;D ;D
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL
  de N8GGG

Arch Hoagland

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #55 on: June 02, 2017, 12:21:06 AM »
Any old Sperry Univac guys out there? Spent 25 years repairing mainframes with them. First machine I worked on had vacuum tubes. I'm old.
2004 Monaco La Palma 36 DBD
W22, 8.1 gas,  Allison 1000 Transmission
7.1 MPG over 80,000 miles

2000 Lexus RX300, 4020lb
U.S. Gear Braking System

SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #56 on: June 07, 2017, 07:39:32 PM »
Well I think I have finally gotten all my computer problems straighten out. I called CenturyLink and they took me through the troubleshooting process and came up blank. They decided to send a technician out. He came out and told me that when they hooked up my lot all they did was bring the wire into a junction box on my lot and it was my responsibility to run the wire into the house, hook up the modem and get the computer running. They did not tell me this when I ordered the service. They gave me an install time that happened to fall when I had a ticket to the Acro-Cats circus. The repairman told me they should have left a note on my door telling me that is was hooked up only to the J box. The next step was to call Comcast and convince them to disconnect my service. They spent a long time trying to convince me not to switch. They kept asking what would it take for me to stay with Comcast. I told them fire everyone in the company and start over. Then they upped their offer to include extra premium channels on cable. Oh joy. Spend more money on more services from a company that has treated me miserably. I told her that if they offered to pay me $50 per month to use their cable I would turn it down. I think the cable companies are the biggest ripoffs in America. Every time I take a vacation and stay in a motel I am stuck with a cable TV. Everything they offer is garbage or costs extra.

The repairman ran a line into my RV and told me all I had to do now was hookup the modem and I would be good to go. So I ordered one from Amazon and it arrived two days later. I hooked it up and it got a signal from CL but no Internet. After a few hours of troubleshooting unsuccessfully I gave up and called CL. They tried a bunch of trouble shooting ideas and they all failed so they set up an appointment for the repairman to return. Different guy this time. He checked the signal at the J box and declared it good. Told me to call the modem manufacturer and have them set the modem to work properly. So I called them and they told me it was not their problem, call my ISP. So at this point I realized the only way for this to work would be to return the modem to Amazon and order a modem from CL. It was a lot more expensive to buy one from CL.

Finally the modem arrived. I hooked it up and got online without too many hassles. I am getting the 10mps that they advertised. I have checked it many times and it is always right around 10mps. So I am a happy camper, I now no longer have to put up with Comcast. The only problem I have left will be getting both companies to straighten out the bill. I know both of them will be wrong. I may just give up and pay them so I don't have to go though a few hours of customer service hell.

I deeply appreciate everyone's help with this wacky computer problem.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

Arch Hoagland

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #57 on: June 07, 2017, 11:59:13 PM »
Glad to hear you are up and running.
2004 Monaco La Palma 36 DBD
W22, 8.1 gas,  Allison 1000 Transmission
7.1 MPG over 80,000 miles

2000 Lexus RX300, 4020lb
U.S. Gear Braking System

Alfa38User

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #58 on: June 08, 2017, 11:16:46 AM »
Quote
.... He came out and told me that when they hooked up my lot all they did was bring the wire into a junction box on my lot and it was my responsibility to run the wire into the house, hook up the modem and get the computer running.

This has been the norm for at least 35 years now. Everything past the junction box is the responsibility of the subscriber if you don't choose to pay for the installation but they should have made sure you understood that.....

Glad you got it up and running.
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
Alfa Gold 38 (2000) 5ver (parked!)

"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

SeilerBird

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Re: Wacky Internet access problem
« Reply #59 on: June 08, 2017, 11:34:39 AM »
This has been the norm for at least 35 years now. Everything past the junction box is the responsibility of the subscriber if you don't choose to pay for the installation but they should have made sure you understood that.....
I have been living in an RV for the last 15 years and I have not been getting cable or home Internet so therefore I had no clue that this might be the norm.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Life list of birds:
https://goo.gl/photos/xuP9zPD2KP2swN1g8
Grand Canyon photos:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7

 

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