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Author Topic: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY  (Read 400 times)

grooving grandpa

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Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« on: May 31, 2017, 08:21:22 PM »
Traveling to Washington DC at end of June staying at Cherry Hill RV Park. Heard the Skyline Drive connecting Shenandoah National Park and the Great Smoky Mountains is a sight seeing trip of over 400 miles. Max speed limit is 45 miles per hour. I would think with sight seeing you are looking at 4-5 days. Driving a 36 ft diesel pusher with a tow car. Doesn't seem to be any over nights camping spots. Would my wife be paranoid on this narrow Rd. Can you stay over night at visitor centers.

Thanks, Lou

LarsMac

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2017, 10:05:05 PM »
The Parkway has a few tunnels with low clearance, so you have to mind them, If you're under 13', you should be fine.
There are several campground areas along the parkway. No hook-ups, At least last time I was running it, but they can accommodate decent size rigs. http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/v.php?pg=19


 
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JackL

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2017, 05:26:06 AM »
My take: If you do it once you will never do it again !

We live right close to the Blue Ridge Parkway near Spruce Pine in NC. and have done the whole way from the great Smokies to the end in Virginia.
 The most beautiful part is between Asheville and Boone NC. The rest including Skyline Drive is scenic, but not nearly as beautiful as around Grandfather Mountain, and can get old real quick.

 We made the mistake many years ago of coming home from New England and driving the entre length and I vowed I would never do it again as long as I live.

Try it, but if it was me, I would Do the portion in NC, and then swing over to I-81 in Virginia some place after Boone

Jack L

kdbgoat

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2017, 06:07:01 AM »
I kinda agree with JackL. On the Blueridge Parkway section, there are things right along the Parkway to do and see. Once inside Shenandoah National Park, there's not much to see or do along the road. All the interesting things are available only by hiking.
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John Stephens

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2017, 10:51:38 AM »
I just researched this yesterday while planning out our August vacation. We are staying in Asheville (Swannanoa) for a week and are going to take the Blue Ridge from Asheville to Cherokee so we can be there by 2:30PM on 8/21 since that area will be in totality during the eclipse. While in Asheville, we are planning a day trip in the car to head north to Grandfather Mountain and up to around Boone. This way, we'll be able to see most of the NC part of the Parkway, which is supposed to be the most beautiful.

I searched the Google Maps satellite view at closest resolution to view the turns on both the Parkway between Asheville and Cherokee, as well as US 441 going through the Smoky Mountains since we will be taking it all the way to Pigeon Forge the same day and found nothing that will give us a problem with a 39' MH + toad. However, we will be getting off the Parkway before Cherokee at US 19 to avoid two tunnels that are less than 11' high.

Trying to see all of the NC section of the Parkway in two days will not give us a lot of time to stop and sightsee, but we feel confident we'll see all we want.

I can't speak for the Virginia portion of the Parkway, but from what I've heard, it simply isn't as spectacular.
John
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LarsMac

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2017, 11:56:25 AM »
 The best part of Skyline Drive (IMHO)is the 100 some miles between Afton, VA and Front Royal. THAT is about a three hour drive.  And the Blue Ridge Parkway, Cherokee to Boone.
Trying to do the whole drive would be mind-numbingly tedious. There are some nice day trip sections all along the way, but you do NOT want to try doing that whole drive, that way, unless you are planning to take all summer, and stop and play in all the terrific places you can find along the route.
 
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Dragginourbedaround

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2017, 04:02:03 PM »
The best part of Skyline Drive (IMHO)is the 100 some miles between Afton, VA and Front Royal. THAT is about a three hour drive.  And the Blue Ridge Parkway, Cherokee to Boone.
Trying to do the whole drive would be mind-numbingly tedious. There are some nice day trip sections all along the way, but you do NOT want to try doing that whole drive, that way, unless you are planning to take all summer, and stop and play in all the terrific places you can find along the route.
:))
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Patnsuzanne

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2017, 06:20:23 PM »
We haven't done the whole way, but we have done large segments of both the BRP and Skyline drive in two different cars, and the truck, sans TT. While they are fun in the smaller vehicles (especially the Mustang!) I'm quite certain the drive would get old very quickly in a rig as large as yours. DW enjoyed the views, but I was busy negotiating the umpteen curves, rises, drops and even more bends. There are a number of pull-offs at scenic overlooks or trail heads that may give you an occasional break. Campgrounds in the Shenandoah National Forest on Skyline Drive are dry camping only (I believe) and are first come, first served. Some also have length restrictions. Also, since it is in a national park, you have to pay to get up onto Skyline Drive. Not so on the Blue Ridge.
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HappyWanderer

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2017, 07:19:22 PM »
This is one of those scenic roads that I wouldn't wouldn't even think about doing in an RV. While it may be possible, you won't enjoy the ride.

I would stay at a nearby campground and make it a day trip with the toad.
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grooving grandpa

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2017, 11:07:55 PM »
WOW, I really appreciate all the posts.Great Cons and Pros. Since neither me nor my wife are hikers at our age, we are going to pass. Being from Northern California we have driven some beautiful mountains with redwood trees. The boss says she would rather go to the Beach, so Myrtle Beach is it. For us, a two day drive from Cherry Hill Park. Staying at the Myrtle Beach State Park. Full hookups with sewer. 300 yards from the beach. Lucky to get in. $40 a night.
Thanks again to all. This forum is great.
Lou

kdbgoat

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Re: Traveling the Blue Ridge HWY
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2017, 05:58:04 AM »
I hope you didn't misunderstand what I said about the hiking part. Through NC and South Va, there is quite a bit to see and do right off of the Parkway. It's just on the Shenandoah National Park portion that one must hike to see anything.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
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