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Author Topic: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice  (Read 396 times)

mountainlady

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I'm looking at buying a truck and TT and am attempting to figure this all out on my own LOL.  I know not to trust the dealers on weight issues for sure!  However, I am currently looking at new Chevy trucks and the dealer told me yesterday that the 2017 Chevy 1500 can tow 9200#.  I was looking at getting a 2500HD, which I'm sure can tow more; however, if I don't need it and can do well with the 1500 I would go that route (but want to be sure).

The TT's I'm looking at have a GVWR (read here NOT to look at dry weights) of 6650# (Grand Design Imagine), 7000# (Winnie), and 7200# (Cougar Xlite).  Dealer said I would be well within the weight ratings of the 2017 Chevy 1500.  I didn't find out what the GCWR or the curb weight of the truck is though, but from looking at the model online (2017 CHevy 1500 LT Z71) it would be around 5400# curb weight of the truck.  It has a 3.42 rear axle gear ratio.  Max payload is 1850.  Of course, I would have the weight of the hitch, etc., and if I was able I'd like to put my Polaris ATV in the bed sometimes that weighs 748# but not sure if that would just be too much.

I'm trying to sort this out on my own and any advice would be much appreciated guys! Thanks!

Alfa38User

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2017, 11:41:14 AM »
Quote
Max payload is 1850

Where did this number come from?? The published figures are often inaccurate as they only represent the capacity of a base level truck, not taking into account the trim levels etc. of the particular truck YOU might want. The only payload figure that counts is the one printed on the (often yellow) sticker found on the door column of any given truck as it represents that exact truck's payload capacity as it was shipped from the manufacturer. The 1500 version can handle quite a good load but.... can also be restrictive.  That Cougar , (for example) would present at least a 730 pounds load (CCC) taking into account only the VGWR + a WD Hitch, not to mention anything else to be carried in the truck. The truck can usually tow a lot but carry the weight (CCC) too and stop the vehicles should trailer brakes fail??

With the ATV at 750 and the trailer at 730, without anything else in the truck, (people, dogs supplies etc) you are already at 1480lbs as payload or CCC. The sticker is the bible!!
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 11:53:48 AM by Alfa38User »
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
Alfa Gold 38 (2000) 5ver (parked!)

"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

mountainlady

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2017, 11:59:30 AM »
When I got back I will have to check for that sticker on the actual trucks.  THanks!  The 1850 payload is what he told me.  He also told me that the '17 Chevy 1500's now all have a trailering package included in them and a "hill descent control".  I looked for the trailer brake thing on the dash but didn't see one on the 1500's I saw so not sure what the "trailer package" is that's included. ???

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2017, 12:56:17 PM »
Hill descent control is not a trailer brake. It manages the speed of the truck, but you still need separate a trailer brake controller to work the trailer brakes. Some trucks now come with that as well, but make sure you ask about a "trailer brake controller" and not something that sounds similar.

You were looking good on that 1500 until you threw the ATV into the equation. Not enough CCC for that plus the trailer. You need the 2500 if that's part of your plan. Whether gas or diesel, the 2500 will have much higher cargo capacity.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 12:58:38 PM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
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mountainlady

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2017, 01:26:15 PM »
Thanks for your advice, Gary  :).  I can always not take the ATV but have to seriously consider whether I at least want the option to bring it or don't care to I guess.  I will have to look at that sticker on the trucks and get back here with that info.  I definitely want to be sure I have enough truck. 

grashley

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2017, 08:58:34 PM »
Welcome to the Forum!!

Very good advise above!

Here is why you should NOT trust the salespeople!  You are correct!

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,90933.0.html

In hopefully understandable language, here are the critical parameters.  This is for any truck - 1500 or 2500.

I would start from how much I want to carry.  I will assume a 7500# GVWR Travel Trailer (TT), since it is a round number and just a bit heavier than any of those you listed.   This TT will have a hitch wt of 750# (10%) to 950# (12.7%).   You also have a 750# ATV.  You will need a WD hitch (80#) ramps to load and unload the ATV (30#), fuel for ATV (40# for 5 gal), plus 400# for you and other misc cargo carried in  the truck (emphasis on other cargo!).  This totals 2250#.

The truck needed to carry all of this MUST HAVE at least 2250# Payload, or Cargo Carrying Capacity (CCC).  The yellow label on the driver door latch post will give you the CCC for THAT truck.  You are clearly in 2500 territory.  Without the ATV, you are at the top edge of 1500 capacity.

To help decipher ad talk:
The Max Towing capacity is calculated using the BASE vehicle for a given configuration, plus max tow package.  It includes 2 passengers at 150# each, a full tank of fuel and NO OTHER CARGO OR OPTIONS!  Every pound added to the truck - factory options, aftermarket options, passengers and cargo - in excess of 300# must be subtracted from this number.

Same for published Payload - base model of the configuration, full tank of fuel, and NOTHING ELSE.  NO OPTIONS, NO PASSENGERS.  They want big numbers for bragging rights.  Technically, Payload = GVWR - curb wt of truck.  The claimed payloads are sometimes a few hundred pounds above this number!  The ad folks can't even do simple math based on their own charts!

A Trailer Brake Control is REQUIRED to safely tow a TT.  It may be as an option on the truck or one of the very good aftermarket units.

Some free advice, and worth exactly what you paid for it!
Make SURE you LOVE the floor plan of the camper you choose.  Spend a few hours in it,  Pretend to cook, shower, use the toilet, sit to read, watch TV or do your favorite craft.  Does it all work?  If you are stuck inside for a couple days due to bad weather, will you go stir crazy?

I assume you plan on using this for extended vacations, and not a full time home.  What you propose should work well for this.  I fear it will be too small for a full time home.

Have you considered a gently used TT?  They are readily available and the factory warranty issues are already resolved, and the TT is ready to use.  New campers often spend more time than new RVers can believe back at the dealership for repairs.  The qualifications of the people doing the repairs and damage they may cause is another issue!

You have a great plan!  Thank you for coming here first!
Preacher Gordon
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RedandSilver

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2017, 09:54:18 PM »
Here's my 2¢.

There is basically no such thing as too much truck.
IF your user name means you live in or near mountains then my choice would be for a 2500 HD Diesel and no less.
Also IMO don't rule out the GMC versions as they are a step (or two) up from the Chevy versions.  But worth the extra money.

IF you get a somewhat longer TT then you could fill up with the semi-trucks (diesel fuel) and pull straight through with the TT attached.
IF you get a gas unit and have to refuel with the cars while your TT is attached it can be an inconvenience or a nightmare compared
to a straight pull-through at the diesel stations that truckers use.  That is one small reason I have a diesel MH not to mention the torque
difference compared to almost any gas unit.  Also the diesel should be quieter then a gas unit because it runs at lower RPM's vs. a gas unit,
especially going up hills while towing.

So IF you don't have either and can afford a new truck go ahead and get the bigger one and buy a used TT which will be ready to roll.
Because many NEW TT are not like a new car or truck purchase which have High levels of quality control vs. what seems like no quality control
on new RV's of almost any make or model now a days.  JMO.
2002 Rexhall Rose Air  Cummins 8.3  350hp

ip076

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2017, 12:00:40 AM »
I believe the hill descent control you mention is part of the Z71 packages and is more of a slow speed, off road, thing. It has nothing to do with towing.

The diesel package will have an exhaust brake. Now that, and the smooth downshifting of the auto trans, does an amazing job of keeping your speed in check. I drove over two passes in the NW this week, no issues whatsoever with a nearly 14,000 lb trailer pushing me downhill.
2017 Chevrolet 3500HD Duramax - Crew Cab, 6.5' bed, SRW
2016 Heartland Bighorn 3270RS

ip076

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2017, 12:01:54 AM »
One last thing, if you're considering the 2500 you should really consider the 3500. Very little price difference, if at all, and it gives you many more options down the road.
2017 Chevrolet 3500HD Duramax - Crew Cab, 6.5' bed, SRW
2016 Heartland Bighorn 3270RS

Arch Hoagland

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2017, 02:56:19 AM »
What engine is in the Chevy 1500?
2004 Monaco La Palma 36 DBD
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7.1 MPG over 80,000 miles

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rvannie23

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2017, 09:20:53 AM »
I recently went through this exact thing and I went with the 2500HD and regret nothing. GVWR on the trailer is 7800 and the truck does great with it. I also personally love driving a diesel.

Don't listen to anything the dealer says most of them don't drive trucks, or haul anything, and know very little. That was my experience. As someone else mentioned there is no such thing as too much truck and I feel much safer towing by myself knowing that my truck is more than capabale to be doing what it's doing.

Just a heads up, if you google the specifications for the LTZ you will find a brochure from chevy that tells you the different GVWR and curb weights etc of the exact model with options like 4x4, crew cab, etc. That should give you a better idea if you do decide to go with the 1500. Diesel is where it's at though  8)
2014 Laredo 274rb TT
2015 Duramax
FL - MS - TX

glen54737

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2017, 10:31:10 AM »
Diesel is where it's at though  8)
:)) The tool of choice for towing.  8)
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ducnut

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2017, 04:30:10 PM »
If it were me, I'd skip considering a 1/2T. If you went that route, you eliminate your ATV option, you'll be up around the truck's max capability, and, as mentioned, you'll be limiting future trailering options.

You don't necessarily have to go with a diesel, but, they are nice to pull with. However, they're much more expensive to purchase and maintain. Your "personal desires" balance sheet will have to make that determination. But, I've seen the large gas options doing very well, pulling some big fifth-wheel trailers. For the trailers you're considering, a gas will easily do the job.

A 2500, with extended or crew cab, 4wd, 8' bed, and 6.0L gas engine would be a nice truck, without being excessive.

Gods Country

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2017, 04:51:06 PM »
Congrats on your decision to purchase and to keeping an open mind as to the correct TV.
I think you should strongly consider the 3/4 ton.  That would give you the flexibility to carry your ATV and a trailer that suits your needs.

mn blue skies II

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Re: On my own and looking at truck/trailer purchase,weights advice
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2017, 10:12:52 AM »
We started with an SUV to pull our trailer, Need more truck to go into the mountains upgraded to a 1500 ram, now we have a 3500 ram could have saved a lot of money getting a bigger truck to start with.  Decide what you need and get the next bigger one, it will make towing more enjoyable.   

 

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