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Author Topic: Half Ton Towable  (Read 1193 times)

IowaNomads

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Half Ton Towable
« on: July 09, 2017, 03:40:32 PM »
We have rulled out motorhomes for our RV. I've seen many ads saying the trailers are half ton towable. Are those claims believable? Also to be so light do they sacrifice quality in the build leading to problems sooner than later?
Taking the road less traveled usually means a few bumps along the way, but a lot more freedom and happiness.

Gods Country

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2017, 04:41:54 PM »
Nothing is believable except what the trailer actually weighs (use max load as a more realistic weight), and the specs of your specific TV.  Anything else is BS.

keymastr

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2017, 04:43:38 PM »
Depends on the builder. I just bought an Outdoors RV Creekside  23 RBS that is part of their half ton towable series but in my opinion only the smaller 2 trailers in that line really qualify. Mine has a dry weight of nearly 6000 pounds and a gross weight of 7500 and although it fit the specs of my 12 year old half ton, it was really a bit too much. Better to stay at 6000 gross or less for most half tons. I just bought an F250 and it is a much better fit. Not such a big difference pulling it but turning and stopping are vastly improved.

Mine is 24' and 27 bumper to ball so not light. Quality is not light and this one has no wood other than the marine plywood sheeting for floor and roof. No chipboard, aluminum frame. 2 inch thick foam walls for true zero degree usability. Many others are just flimsy but you get a 32' trailer at the same weight.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2017, 09:12:36 PM »
Believable?  Perhaps, but take them with several grains of salt. Half-ton trucks have a rather wide range of tow capability, so not every half ton can tow every trailer labeled that way. Probablysome half-ton model somewhere can tow that trailer, but if yours cannot, who cares?

So forget the ads and get the tow rating and payload (cargo capacity) rating for YOUR truck and compare to the trailer GVWR and tongue or pin weight. Assume travel trailer tongue weight to be 10% of GVWR and 5W pin weight to be 20% of GVWR and you will be in the right ball park.

If you are looking at 5W trailers, be aware that very few half tons have the payload capacity (CCC) to handle the pin weight of any but the smallest 5W trailers.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

longhaul

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2017, 09:34:46 PM »
Gary has some good advice.
 The 1/2 ton towables have been around since rv first hit the streets. Nothing new there.

 Expanding on the wide range of load carrying ability and ability to pull more weight is the different specs on what is called a 1/2 ton truck. Examples;
 '00-'06 era 1500HD GM trucks with a 8600 gvwr and 6000 ln rawr 6.0 engine 4L80e tranny 3300+ lb payloads and 10000+ lb tow capacities. GM current NHT package has a 7600 gvwr and 4300 rawr 3.73 gears 6 and 8 speed trannies and can have a 420 hp/460 torque 6.2 v8.

 The 1500 Mega cab Dodge trucks with a 8510 gvwr and 6000 lb rawr 5.7 hemi a full hd frame.

 Fords F150HD with 8200-7850 gvwr and 4800 RAWR 5.0 or 3.5 EB engine with 2500 + lb payloads in the bed and 10000+ lb tow ratings.

 And of course some 1/2 ton trucks come with very small engines/high gears/small 6k gvwrs and 3k rawr...and in between.

 One half ton towable...depends on the trucks specs and they do vary greatly like Fords F150 with over a dozen GVWR numbers and several different rawr numbers.

 

UTTransplant

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2017, 08:20:54 AM »
By all the numbers, my trailer should have been easily towed by my Toyota Tundra (10,000 pound tow limit). Weights were all well inside of specifications, only two passengers in truck, 8000 pound trailer with all tanks full. The experience was not pleasant though. We had to stop for fuel ever 150 miles, got 6-7 mph in our standard trips (lots of mountains), and it took a lot of effort to drive. We traded the very nice Tundra for a 3/4 ton diesel, and it is like night and day. No struggling going up a hill (or down!), better mileage, just a more comfortable ride.
Pam and Kevin plus Minou and Lily (the cats) plus Lexi (the grand-dog)
2014 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 240RKS
2015 Ram 2500 Diesel
http://toobusyforwork.com

Roy M

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2017, 11:18:25 AM »
X2 That was our experience too. Two trips convinced us the truck was definitely up to the task. The current Ram ctd is overkill for our present needs but the journey is much more enjoyable plus we can upgrade the trailer within reason without killing the truck.

IowaNomads

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2017, 07:08:49 PM »
Found this on Craigslist. Do you think this would be up to pulling a bumper pull TT?
https://desmoines.craigslist.org/cto/6175231587.html
Taking the road less traveled usually means a few bumps along the way, but a lot more freedom and happiness.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2017, 07:54:15 PM »
You seem to have missed the point of the previous replies. You need to get the numbers for that truck, and then compare the corresponding load weights from whatever trailer you want to tow.

Yes, there is some travel trailer that Suburban will pull. Probably several of them. Whether it will tow one you are interested in buying  is anybody's guess.  I'm thinking that is the C1500 turbo-diesel version of the Suburban, and those are typically rated to tow around 8000 lbs max. That's based on 1999 data, the oldest I could find. Whether the Suburban can also handle the 800 lbs of tongue weight that goes with a trailer that side is an unknown. Probably, if no more than 3-4 people in the SUV.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Jimdamedic

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2017, 08:17:30 PM »
We have a Keystone Cougar 2016 xlite 27 foot fifth wheel that we pull with a 2013 Dodge Ram 1500. Circumstances dictated that we keep the truck with the trailer. This is our third summer pulling the camper and it has been fine. We put it on the scale and we are RIGHT ON the max weight for the rear axle. A couple of caveats, we live in Iowa and stay within a couple hundred miles from home. If I was going across the country I'd probably want a 2500. Having said that, I've never once felt out of control and the trailer pulls like a dream. I just think the mountains might be a little much for it.

Lowell

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2017, 08:36:05 PM »
I've pulled a 28 ft TT with a half ton pickup for 12 years now and couldn't be happier with the performance. But I have a truck/trailer combination that is well with my truck rated capacity.  If you follow Gary's advice, check the specifications and select a TT accordingly, you should be fine.  I don't believe in maxing out the load on any vehicle.  Leave yourself some margin.
Lowell

2005 Cherokee28A TT
pulled by 2009 Dodge 1500 Crew Cab 4X4
KF7YET

Tempe, Arizona

touchracing

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2017, 06:56:05 AM »
This is a cart and horse question.  It's pick a truck then a trailer it can tow or pick a trailer then a truck to tow it.
Wherever I may roam

Gods Country

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2017, 07:14:03 AM »
This is a cart and horse question.  It's pick a truck then a trailer it can tow or pick a trailer then a truck to tow it.

That's what it comes down to.
Either purchase the TV you want and live with whatever restrictions that may impose, or buy the trailer of your dreams and accept having to purchase a TV that can handle it. 


grashley

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2017, 09:06:08 PM »
THE DEFINITIVE ANSWER IS   ...      It all depends on WHICH truck and WHICH trailer.

Here is why to NEVER believe a salesman concerning RV towing:

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,90933.0.html

VERY FEW ton trucks can comfortably tow any FW.  Exceptions include a lightly optioned late model F150 with the HCPP (High Capacity Payload Package) - very hard to find.

This is why.  The actual truck payload from the yellow label on the driver door latch post (NOT from any sales literature!)  MUST be able to handle the weight of all passengers, pets, tools, firewood and other cargo in the truck, PLUS 200# for a FW hitch PLUS 20%  of the GVWR of the FW as pin wt.
Assuming a typical 1800# actual Payload, 7500# GVWR FW (1500# pin wt)  200# hitch, 500# for mom, dad and 2 kids and 200# misc cargo, you just put a 2400# load into an 1800# capacity truck.   DO NOT USE DRY WT OR PUBLISHED PIN WT!!!

If we do the same math with a TT, pin wt of 20% becomes hitch wt of 10% of GVWR and the hitch only weighs about 80#.  Using the example above, 1800# payload, 750# hitch wt, 80# hitch, 500# passengers and 200# misc cargo = 1530#.  This is 270# below Payload and almost 900# less than the same weight FW.
Preacher Gordon
09 Grand Junction 35 TMS - not yet received
2013 F350 Lariat LB SRW Supercab diesel 4X4
Nimrod Series 70 popup (sold)
It's not a dumb question if you do not know the answer.

xrated

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2017, 06:22:14 AM »
Amen Preacher.. ^^^^^^!
2016 F350 Crew Cab Dually King Ranch Diesel
2017 Keystone Fuzion Impact 303
Track Bike  2008 GSX-R750
"If it ain't Fast......It ain't Fun

RVfixer

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2017, 11:47:58 AM »
Sorry for the very long post but I have been looking for a place to put these thoughts for a while.  Remember, you can skip or speed read this post..............

I tow with a half ton.  I have read all the derogatory posts about half-ton towing online.  I disagree with the majority of them.  I especially disagree with the ones that say that the brakes on half-tons are too small to stop the trailer, the transmission or rear-end gearing is too weak or the suspension is too weak.  Those are exactly the items, and others, that the engineers take into consideration when setting the tow rating.  I do personally feel that the engineers are under a lot of pressure to set the tow rating as high as possible for competitiveness.  That is just my personal thinking and because of that I want a good safety margin between max gross weight of the trailer and the TV tow rating.

However, there is an additional problem when purchasing a half-ton tow vehicle, especially a used one.  That problem is knowing "for sure" what the "actual"l tow rating is!!  I did a little survey at campgrounds a few years ago and found, not surprisingly to me, that many people towing with half-ton's do not know the actual tow rating of their half-ton truck and likely do not know the actual weight of their loaded trailers.  Amazing!!  When asked how they found their tow rating many people said "from television advertisements, the salesman told me and other inaccurate sources.  Then, while not knowing their actual tow rating they match that truck up with a trailer with a max gross that is very close or at the tow rating.  Some even use the empty weight and say they won't carry much...Wrong!!  It is no wonder that half-ton tow vehicles have a bad reputation!!

When I bought my first half-ton tow vehicle (a Ram 1500) the salesman and the sales manager claimed the advertised tow rating for their trucks.  Well, that was totally wrong!!  I don't think they were lying I just don't think they knew and better....not that I don't think salesman lie.  In fact not one of the Ram 1500's on their lots, or any other dealers that they checked for me, had a truck with the proper rear-end gear ratio that resulted in that advertised tow rating...if you didn't add any option packages.  The trucks on their lots actually had tow ratings that were 1400+ pounds "below" the advertised tow rating.  This was because none of the dealers ordered trucks with the lower rear-end gear ration because they wanted the sticker to show the best gas mileage possible.  The lower towing gear ratio adds some gas consumption.

In order to get the half-ton truck with the advertised tow rating I had or order the truck and wait for it to be built.  So, unless you know what you are doing and know how to properly determine a half-ton vehicle's tow rating for sure...you can go VERY wrong!  I was in a dealer's shop getting an oil change and tire rotation while out of town on a long trip.  While the truck was being serviced I walked into the showroom.  There was a Ram 1500 half-ton in the showroom with a sign plugged into the hitch receiver.  The sign read "Tow 10,200 pounds with this truck."  WRONG!!  The actual max tow rating for that vehicle was 8,800 pounds due to the rear-end gear ratio.  Actually, it was less than that due to the option packages that were installed.  I brought that to the attention of a salesman and he kindly told me what I was full of......   Later, I walked back out in the showroom to see if I could have more fun with a different salesman and that sign was gone.  Go figure!

We do not do much big mountain towing but do a lot of mountain driving in the east...some would call them hills...up to 7,000 foot.  We do a 3+ month winter trip and a bunch of two and three-week trips for a total of about 7 months on the road per year.  I have no problems at all towing with my half-ton.  I have had three half-ton trucks and two TTs.  I kept each truck 7 or 8 years.  I'll not make this any longer than it is by going into why I bought a half-ton in the first place except to say it involved a health issue and the 3/4 ton rides were all too stiff when not towing.  I got the half-ton and a trailer that at max gross weight was 1,000 plus pounds below the tow rating of the truck...and I never had the truck loaded to max gross.

The trailer we have now we really like.  I was really surprised at the numbers on this trailer.  The listed empty weight is 5,639 pounds (not weighed).  The max gross is 10,000 pounds...Wow, that is a theoretical 4,361 carrying capacity.  Now, I went against my rule of having a 1,000 + pound safety margin between the tow rating and the max gross on the trailer due to the huge carrying capacity .  So the tow rating on my half-ton is 10,200 and the trailer max gross is10,000 pounds.  However, as weighed we went on the road at 7,200 pounds.  After 3 years of growth we now weighed out on our heaviest and longest trip (last winter)...which was the reason for weighing the loaded trailer again...at just a little over 7,800 pounds.  A 2,400 pound delta under our max tow rating... less the small amount of stuff loaded in the truck.  I figure that I am at least 1,800+ pounds under my tow rating as loaded for our heaviest and longest trip which is down the east coast and pretty much level ground.

I am very happy with half-ton towing if done properly and the actual weight and rating numbers are determined and used!  If asked about tow vehicles I always recommend at 3/4 ton but I am sticking with my "done properly" half-ton.  I enjoyed a lower purchase price, lower personal property tax (our state), lower maintenance costs, lower registration costs (our state) and lower insurance costs over a 3/4 ton.  I use an Equalizer hitch properly set up and am very happy with the stability and braking, even on panic stops...there have been a few and I was impressed with the stopping distance at speed... (Yikes!).  I can run with the big trucks and in the winds and cross winds and have no issues.  I run between 60 and 65 MPH, with short excursions higher when passing, and try to stay above 60 on highways.  That puts me in a sweet spot in the torque/HP curves.

Other things on the trailer that I like to look at, no matter what I am towing with, are the following.  I look at the listed empty weight vs the empty tongue weight.  Then I look to see where the storage areas are and see if that makes sense with my goal of coming up with around 12% + or - tongue weight when loaded.  In other words, if the empty tongue weight listed is heavy...and most of the storage areas are forward (or the reverse) I would avoid that trailer especially for a half-ton.  Next I look at the tire load ranges vs the max gross weight of the trailer.  If the manufacturer can squeeze in with a load range that is just good enough he will...not so good.  If he just can't fit with the lower load range and has to go up one range...Better!  I look at the holding tank capacities.  The larger the tanks the longer I can stay on a site without hook ups or with water and electric only.  I like 40/40/40 as a minimum for holding tanks.  That is pretty large as travel trailers go.  Our present trailer has 56 gals fresh water, 76 grey (two tanks) and 41 black.  I don't like having forward and aft dump stations.  I was pleasantly surprised to find this trailer with a backwater dump valve and two grey-water valves all at the same aft dump outlet.  The forward galley grey tank was plumbed all the way to the aft dump outlet...nice!  We also have specific floorplan and appliance features that we like but these are personal choices.  We have a must have list and a nice to have list for floorplan and appliance features.

OK, I finally got this off my chest...Again sorry for the very long post.         

kdbgoat

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2017, 12:04:12 PM »
Yep, I agree. I pulled 8200# (scaled) with mine. I was right at the raggedy edge weight limit wise, but that Ram 1500 handled it with no issues.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

itsbobmd

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2017, 03:13:02 PM »
New here, but today is there really any 1/2 ton trucks out there?

EVERY Ford, Dodge and Chevy have payloads WELL over 1/2 ton.. some 1.5 tons.

With that said, tow ratings are arbitrary, and not very confident that we have any science to support most manufacturers ratings.. in fact many have increased over the years with NO mechanical changes to their trucks.

The norm in our business is a vehicle is limited normally by the tow hitch and suspension.. if we go over those limits we go from a tow behind to a fifth wheel and that increases our towing capability usually but a multiple of 3 or 4.

For example.. HUMVEE is limited to 4200 pounds towing due to the type of tow hitch and bumper mount.. BUT the payload is a little over 2000 pounds.  Tow behind trailer is limited to 4200 pounds, but a 5th wheel can be as much as 15,000 pounds.

I've never seen a comparison like this for consumer pick up trucks.. If the manufacturer says "7000 lbs is your towing capacity" they never differentiate from tow behind or 5th wheel.. I believe a 5th wheel can safely exceed the manufacturers tow capacity, but the question is, by how much per individual model of truck??


Bottom line, there is a huge capacity difference depending on how you choose to tow.

kdbgoat

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2017, 05:54:40 AM »
A lot of the manufacturer's literature does differentiate between fifth wheel/gooseneck and "bumper" towing. It all boils down to being under the GCWR and the GVWR. Either way, no matter what, a tow vehicle has to be able to pull the trailer and carry the pin/tongue weight of the trailer. One must also not exceed the axle ratings either. When one gets close, it's a fine balancing act. Then there's the issue of the sail effect of the trailer. 
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

FLMikeG

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 09:29:45 PM »
Generally speaking, 1/2 ton truck - no more than a single axle TT. If it has dual axles, it's likely too heavy or right on the borderline.

I drive a Ford F150, V8. Pulling a 17-ft TT that weighs right around 2000 pounds. I barely know it's back there when I am towing it and I like it that way.  :)
2000 Ford F-150 Supercab XLT, V8
1983 Sunline 16' Custom Caravan

steveblonde

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2017, 06:35:24 AM »
Generally speaking, 1/2 ton truck - no more than a single axle TT. If it has dual axles, it's likely too heavy or right on the borderline.

I drive a Ford F150, V8. Pulling a 17-ft TT that weighs right around 2000 pounds. I barely know it's back there when I am towing it and I like it that way.  :)


Sorry but you cannot compare a 17 yr old 1/2 ton f150 to a 2017 1/2 ton f150  apples and oranges. Yes there are lots of trailers that are 1/2 ton towable BUT as others have said you need to match them up. Yes a 3/4 ton will give you a billion more options and a 1 ton a billion more
2015 Voltage 3305 Toy Hauler - loaded
2017 Ford Escape my Daily driver - first Ford in 25 yrs
2017 Black on Black F350 Diesel Dually (First Ford Truck after 17 GMs) 5200lbs cargo/weight capacity named Kong


" If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space"
From Canada Eh?

FLMikeG

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #21 on: July 19, 2017, 04:33:39 PM »
Yup, one's made of Detroit steel. The other is made of aluminum, plastic, and fiberglass.  ;)
2000 Ford F-150 Supercab XLT, V8
1983 Sunline 16' Custom Caravan

Lynx0849

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2017, 10:53:15 PM »
Generally speaking, 1/2 ton truck - no more than a single axle TT. If it has dual axles, it's likely too heavy or right on the borderline.

I drive a Ford F150, V8. Pulling a 17-ft TT that weighs right around 2000 pounds. I barely know it's back there when I am towing it and I like it that way.  :)

Generally speaking there is nothing in general. The ratings for a specific truck are all that matter.

My utility trailer has dual axles. That gives me two more brakes. I load it up and it weighs about 6800 lbs.

My 1500 is rated for over 8000 lbs towing with a GCVW of 13,500.

With gas, passenger and some stuff, the truck and 6800 lb trailer is under the max GCVW and under axel ratings and under tire ratings.
However, at 65 mph the gas milage stinks.
Also, hills (mountains ) are really annoying.

Next truck, 3500 ctd.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 05:28:55 PM by scottydl »

Oldgator73

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #23 on: July 20, 2017, 08:56:44 AM »
We tow a Winnie Drop with a Nissan Frontier 4x4 Crew Cab. The Drop fully loaded is rated at 3800lbs. The Frontier max payload is 1368lbs, well over a 1/2 ton payload rating. There's a sticker inside the door that indicates you have to subtract 198lbs from payload due to options added. I am now down to 1170lbs. Still more than 1/2 ton. After all calculations I have concluded the Frontier can tow a TT with a fully loaded weight of 5400lbs. That gives me a 1600lb buffer with Drop. I think I can go up to a unit with a 4000lb dry weight and still tow quite comfortably. That gives me 1400lbs for "stuff". We are mostly weekend and at the most 3-4 days campers so do not carry much with us.

We just returned from a trip to Winnebago factory in Indiana for some warranty work. Truck did a great job. We averaged 11 mpg towing.
2016 Winnebago Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier 4x4 Crew Cab
Air Force Retired
It's not the weight of the load, it's how you carry it.

diablo_can

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2017, 08:21:08 AM »
I have searched and read multiple forums over the last few weeks. I hope my situation helps others out there and educates a few. I have a 2014 Dodge RAM, 5.7L with towing package which includes 120L gas tank, 3.92 rear axle ratio. I recently purchased a 29BH dry weight 6400 LBS, plus gear, etc. 7500 LBS. I use a Blue OX anti-sway bar, and Tekonsha Primus IQ Brake Control which has double axle brake settings and manual over ride. I enable the TOW button in the truck to engage the gearing for towing and away I went on a 6 hr drive up\down hills, and border mountain climbs there and back another 6hrs. This is what I noticed, 20L/100KM-5.2GAL/62 miles for averages, no issues when I maintained a speed under 90km/hr - 55miles/hr. Truck has more then enough power to take off and seemed just fine cruising 70-90km/hr. I am not a novice to pulling around alot of trailer weight, so I made used of the electronic brake manual over-ride if I felt any sway, and to save my truck brakes working on downhills, used it there too. Most people would agree I think with the situation up to that point. Now my issue came in, sway, loose rear end feeling anything over 90km/55miles to keep up with the rest of the traffic going at speed limits or above. I had to maintain the course with my speed and let the world pass me by sticking to my feelings on how my truck felt to me. This is the biggest point I have for anyone, know your limits and your truck and how it feels when you pull something before you get a TT. My issue has a quick solution in my opinion, HD springs, AIR BAGS or both....so I opted to install Air Ride 5000 LBS airbags in the rear of my RAM last week to help with the tongue weight causing rear pull feeling. 35 lbs of air pressure lifts that TT like nothing, so I feel confident it will correct the issue. My next step is, most general people know STOCK is just that, STOCK... so for another $300, I will likely invest in rear HD springs from TUF TRUCK that can handle +50% load ..ie better springs. If I had a FORD, the rear is a leaf spring, the solution there would have been add a another leaf helper for tongue weight concerns.  Hope this helps similar people! Keep RVing all!

steveblonde

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2017, 09:18:46 AM »
air bags do nothing to increase payload and if your driving a Ram with the rear coilovers you get a great ride but the payload including passengers is less than 1400 lbs in most cases
« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 10:26:52 AM by scottydl »
2015 Voltage 3305 Toy Hauler - loaded
2017 Ford Escape my Daily driver - first Ford in 25 yrs
2017 Black on Black F350 Diesel Dually (First Ford Truck after 17 GMs) 5200lbs cargo/weight capacity named Kong


" If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space"
From Canada Eh?

diablo_can

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2017, 09:21:35 AM »
Also I am not looking to increase payload but flatten out the ride itself and take more pressure off those rear coils.

COHauler

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #27 on: July 22, 2017, 03:26:03 PM »
This is exactly why I went with a 1 ton diesel. These problems are not problems anymore.

grashley

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Re: Half Ton Towable
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2017, 08:19:17 PM »
RVFixer

Thank you for a well written, well researched "rant" on ton trucks.  Yes, SOME ton trucks are very capable tow vehicles. Most are not.  As you so well documented, many folks have no idea what their REAL tow capacity is or how much their camper weighs.  EXCELLENT POINTS!

Back when I was a boy in the Eisenhower administration, a ton truck had a 1,000# payload.  A 1 ton truck had a 2,000# payload.  Over time, pickup trucks got bigger motors, better suspensions - and increased payload ratings to meet or beat the competition.  Over time ...  you get to where we are today.  There is one specific F150 configuration with a 3,000# (1 TON!) payload.

Here is where the ad gurus get their data.  F150, for example, comes in 3 cab styles, 3 bed lengths, 2 drive systems (2WD / 4WD), 3 motors and 2 or 3 rear end choices.  3 cab X 3 bed X 2 drive X3 motors X2 rear = OVER 100 UNIQUE CONFIGURATIONS.  Note not all configurations are available, but you get the point.

Engineers set specific GVWR and GCWR for each configuration.  From this, ASSUMING BASE MODEL, NO OPTIONS, base weights are determined, then Payload and Max tow capacity calculated.  These charts are prepared, and marketing picks THE BIGGEST PAYLOAD for any configuration and THE BIGGEST MAX TOW for any configuration, then go to press!!

The ad may read, "The new F150 has a payload of 3,000#"   Not ALL F150, but since there is one, we can claim it!  As RVFixer noted, you will rarely find one like that on the lot, but it is made.

Same for Max Tow.  The ad may read, "The F150 can tow up to 17,500#" with video of a 4WD CC Platinum towing a trailer.  Now, THAT truck can not haul that load, but they do make one that can!

Buyer Beware!  Salesmen may not lie on purpose, but they are often far from the truth.

Felt good to get that off my chest!
Preacher Gordon
09 Grand Junction 35 TMS - not yet received
2013 F350 Lariat LB SRW Supercab diesel 4X4
Nimrod Series 70 popup (sold)
It's not a dumb question if you do not know the answer.

 

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