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Author Topic: maintaining chassis battery charge  (Read 280 times)

Daffy

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maintaining chassis battery charge
« on: August 02, 2017, 05:42:45 PM »
Thinking about utilizing the coach battery charging system to keep the chassis battery charged over next winter instead of a separate batter tender.

My plan is to put a battery disconnect inline with the positives coach to chassis, I know I don't want current from both charging sources to meet, I do park mine in the drive over winter and on occasion use it and run both the engine and generator  while "stored" (nah we use it in the drive over winter too on occasion..) just to get away.

I guess the bottom of my question lies on the capacity of the coach charging system I've never had the reason to look at because it's working..  Plugged into shore power I see 13.6 on the coach batteries.

1999 Itasca Sunflyer Ford.

Yeah I know the possible hazard (destroying electricals) of bucking voltage so adding one item to the checklist preflight and parking is not an issue. (Never run the engine with shore or generator power on and not battery disconnect in proper position.
Too new at this to be a fool yet..

1999 Itasca Sunflyer 36L

jubileee

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  • Posts: 293
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2017, 11:15:59 PM »
I thought I was pretty smart when I made up a short ( 2 feet) set of jumper cables to charge a weak chassis battery while on shore power and not have to mess with battery charger, tender, ect. Then I saw a guy who replaced his emergency start button with a lighted toggle switch. Talking about early nineties motorhomes.

Arch Hoagland

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  • Posts: 1411
  • Clovis CA
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2017, 01:26:38 AM »
Keep an eye on battery water levels over the winter.
2004 Monaco La Palma 36 DBD
W22, 8.1 gas,  Allison 1000 Transmission
7.1 MPG over 80,000 miles

2000 Lexus RX300, 4020lb
U.S. Gear Braking System

Charlie 5320

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  • Posts: 1943
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2017, 07:48:41 AM »
Thinking about utilizing the coach battery charging system to keep the chassis battery charged over next winter instead of a separate batter tender.

My plan is to put a battery disconnect inline with the positives coach to chassis, I know I don't want current from both charging sources to meet, I do park mine in the drive over winter and on occasion use it and run both the engine and generator  while "stored" (nah we use it in the drive over winter too on occasion..) just to get away.

I guess the bottom of my question lies on the capacity of the coach charging system I've never had the reason to look at because it's working..  Plugged into shore power I see 13.6 on the coach batteries.

1999 Itasca Sunflyer Ford.

Yeah I know the possible hazard (destroying electricals) of bucking voltage so adding one item to the checklist preflight and parking is not an issue. (Never run the engine with shore or generator power on and not battery disconnect in proper position.
You can use multiple charging sources without worry. DC is NOT like AC. Most coachs charge the coach batteries while under way from the alternator. If you ever run the generator to run the roof air, then you are charging the batteries from the converter, AND the alternator at the same time. On newer equipment both sources will back off the charging currant when the correct voltage is sensed. Some coachs do charge the chassis batteries from the BCC anyways, when plugged in, some do not. My 98 Daybreak with a Intellitec BCC charged the chassis battery when plugged in, so does my Dolphin. 
2003 National Dolphin 5320
496  8.1  Workhorse

98 Damon Daybreak 3130
GM Vortech 454  4L80E
SOLD

Bill N

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  • Posts: 1496
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2017, 09:55:42 AM »
Not sure I understand the problem but there is a product called Trik-L-Start that connects the coach and chassis batteries and allows the chassis battery to charge from the coach battery when the coach battery is being charged from an outside source - generator or campground power.  Costs about $45 and easy to install.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Grace-10 & Squeak-4, Winnie - 5 months

Howard R

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  • Posts: 541
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2017, 10:16:41 AM »
X 2  on Trik-L-Start    :))  Used on our Mirada.

Howard
2001 Fleetwood Southwind 35R
V10   F53
2003 Jeep Liberty Toad
Minnesota

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2017, 10:39:35 AM »
Trik-L-Start is an excellent solution, but a jumper cable between the positive posts is all that is needed if you just want a winter or temporary storage solution for your Itasca. Both chassis and house batteries already share a common ground (the chassis).

You might want to verify that the house charging system is a 3-stage model. Otherwise, you might be better off using the battery maintainer to reduce loss of electrolyte (water).
« Last Edit: August 03, 2017, 10:41:42 AM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

blw2

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Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2017, 03:45:49 PM »
wait, doesn't the 'Bird' charge the chassis battery?
Mine does, controlled by an Intellitec Bird
Brad (DW + 3 kids)
13 Thor Chateau 31L Class C on Ford E-450
'06 Silverado
'05 Rockwood Freedom 1910 (5-1/2 years)
former tent campers

Daffy

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  • Posts: 78
Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2017, 06:48:10 AM »
Trik-L-Start is an excellent solution, but a jumper cable between the positive posts is all that is needed if you just want a winter or temporary storage solution for your Itasca. Both chassis and house batteries already share a common ground (the chassis).

You might want to verify that the house charging system is a 3-stage model. Otherwise, you might be better off using the battery maintainer to reduce loss of electrolyte (water).

3 Stage Model? Meaning it senses the batteries condition and provides current accordingly? That I haven't looked at and will soon. Thanks.
Too new at this to be a fool yet..

1999 Itasca Sunflyer 36L

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2017, 08:12:10 AM »
Quote
wait, doesn't the 'Bird' charge the chassis battery?
Mine does, controlled by an Intellitec Bird

It would, if he had a BiRD, but the 99 Itasca does not.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: maintaining chassis battery charge
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2017, 08:14:26 AM »
Quote
3 Stage Model? Meaning it senses the batteries condition and provides current accordingly? That I haven't looked at and will soon.

Yes, though single stage units also do some limited sensing. For more info on what constitutes "3-stage" or "smart" charging, see https://www.batterystuff.com/blog/3-stages-of-smart-chargers.html
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

 

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