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Author Topic: Motor Home condensation question.  (Read 537 times)

Bill and Debbie

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Motor Home condensation question.
« on: October 10, 2017, 02:53:39 PM »
As the temps begin to drop, I'm experiencing some condensation especially on the front windshield. Mostly occurs when we are using our 30" range. Wondering other than opening windows if the is some magic I can perform to minimize or eliminate. May just be a by product of heat produced by the stove/oven.

Small thing I know, but if I can minimize it other than not turning on the oven, that would make my day.
William Bonsell
Poulsbo, WA

2010 CT Coachworks Siena 35V
1999 Cherokee Sport with Roadmaster Falcon 5250

blw2

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2017, 03:18:04 PM »
well, it's humidity coming into contact with colder surface, right.....
so ventilate to eliminate the moisture
or
warm the surface....

you say windshield, so I wonder if those exterior shades that cover the glass form the outside might help. (assuming the outside temps are cooler than inside, and the condensation is on the inside of the glass)
I'm only brainstorming here, I have no practical experience with this....
Brad (DW + 3 kids)
13 Thor Chateau 31L Class C on Ford E-450
'06 Silverado
'05 Rockwood Freedom 1910 (5-1/2 years)
former tent campers

RedandSilver

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2017, 03:35:39 PM »
I've had that happen to me too.

Since not breathing is not an option  ;D  and yes humans are some of the problem with condensation,  try opening a roof vent some.

I would also roll up some towels and place them along the bottom edge of the front glass because the water will run downhill sooner or later.
Another thing to try (I haven't yet) is to get some form fitting foil to place in the window so it makes contact with the glass - that may keep
the warm air from hitting the glass which causes the problem.
Other than that maybe a small fan pointed at the inside glass will help - also something I may have to try - but I'm heading South when the
cold air hits so it may not (hopefully) effect me too much again.
2002 Rexhall Rose Air  Cummins 8.3  350hp

Lou Schneider

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2017, 03:43:37 PM »
Are you using the range hood vent fan while you're cooking?  If so, make sure it vents to the outside (some don't) and if it does, make sure the outside vent's flapper is free to open.  Some have latches to keep it closed while travelling
« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 03:45:33 PM by Lou Schneider »

Rene T

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2017, 03:46:12 PM »
Open a roof vent and turn the fan on. Also open a window a little on the opposite end of the rig.  Make sure you are running the hood exhaust fan when cooking.
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

QZ

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2017, 07:03:07 PM »
Burning propane puts water in the air. Open vents or fan on low speed. Breathing will also produce moisture on windows and may be noticeable in cupboards so keep an eye on clothing or mattresses etc that touch cold wall surfaces so they are not damaged. Leaving cupboards open can help.

RVRAC

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2017, 07:22:57 PM »
What about using a dehumidifier?  That is what we use, specially during winter.
2017 Leprechaun 311 FS
Toad: 2016 Jeep Patriot
American Dolly
Home: WI
Snowbird 6 months/yr.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2017, 07:34:33 PM »
No magic. You need to ventilate to help hold the interior humidity done. Or use a portable dehumidifier.

An RV is a relatively small space, so two people breathing, cooking, showers, etc. quickly bring the relative humidity up high. And there are plenty of chilly surface handy for it to condense on.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Bill and Debbie

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2017, 05:15:28 PM »
All good information. Thanks. I've just started using a big squeegee making sure I have a big towel at the bottom of the windshield to collect the moisture running off. Been using the furnace at night as well and may need to open a window up front to vent. Its all good though and not really a big deal when I think of what my issues could be. PTL
William Bonsell
Poulsbo, WA

2010 CT Coachworks Siena 35V
1999 Cherokee Sport with Roadmaster Falcon 5250

Spring Creek

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2017, 06:26:30 PM »
You shouldn't be creating much if any moisture from your furnace because it's vented.  While burning propane does create moisture, that is in an un-vented situation.  So, your first post was right on... your stove and or oven is the source of some of the moisture.

In the northern climates (rural areas) where propane is the main heating source, burning propane in a vented furnace actually consumes moisture, which is why we have to actually run humidifiers in the winter so our skin doesn't fall off from cracking  :P
Kurt
2018 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 31K - 2011 Equinox

Lou Schneider

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2017, 06:54:36 PM »
Burning propane does not "consume" moisture.  It's just that cold air can't hold as much humidity as warmer air, so as the inside air is heated, it's relative humidity goes down.  The opposite case is condensation, as humid air is cooled it reaches a temperature where it's relative humidity exceeds 100% and the excess falls out as water droplets.

It's called "relative" instead of "absolute" humidity because the amount of water the air can carry varies in proportion to it's temperature.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2017, 07:00:09 PM by Lou Schneider »

Spring Creek

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2017, 03:59:58 PM »
Sorry to disagree, the relative humidity in my house after we switched to geothermal is about 25 points higher in the wintertime over propane. I guess if you can explain that Id be willing to listen, but I say burning propane consumes moisture.

And, I dont need to run a humidifier anymore. That is the only thing we changed was the furnace.
Kurt
2018 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 31K - 2011 Equinox

JudyJB

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Re: Motor Home condensation question.
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2017, 04:54:36 PM »
Squeeging the window is good, but the humidity is still probably too high in the rest of your vehicle, so you need to keep a vent and maybe one window open just a bit to ventilate the place.   You do not want excess moisture to cause mold in places you cannot see as easily as you can see your windshield. 
Full-timing for over five years in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N

 

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