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Author Topic: Looking to upgrade from an old C to something bigger and nicer, need some advice  (Read 309 times)

eugenius

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So I am not new to RVing but I am kinda new to motor homes.  I have started tent camping, then got an older pop up, then a newer bumper pull, then into my current RV, a 1993 Jamboree Searcher 23’ class C.  Most of my time spent in my RV is at a local festivals 8-10 weekends a year.  There are no hook ups or anything like that so the motor home won us over because it only takes a few minutes to setup and an onboard generator is very nice.  We constantly camp next to my buddy who has a 2014 Newmar Dutch Star.  Granted I know this is a 400k rig but after camping next to him for the last 2 years I am now ready to upgrade.  We would also like to use it more than what we have.  We normally fly for some family trips but I am thinking it would be nice to take some road trips so something that rides smooth would be nice, but right now its not a must. 
I am very torn right now and wanted to get some opinions.  I have a few options.  I could go with a new A or C under 100k.  I really cant justify anything more than that.  But I would prefer to go with something MUCH cheaper, like a very high quality 15+ year old diesel pusher.  On something used I really don’t want to spend more 50-60k. 
I am open floor plan wise.  My current RV is tiny so practically everything is an upgrade.  I would like something a little bigger.  30+ ft.  But I don’t need anything massive.  I was looking at some 35-38 ft pushers and they seemed to be laid out pretty good.  We don’t spend a ton of time in the RV but it would be nice to beat the heat of the day sometimes.  This weekend we needed a break from walking around the festival but my RV is so small we just ended up sitting outside.  It was 95 degrees and felt like 110 so it would have been nice to catch a little AC mid day.
Option 1: Something new under 100k.  Can be a C, can be an A. 
Pros: Its new.  Warranty.  Easy to finance.  Cons: Massive depreciation.  Expensive.  Would be purchasing an “entry level motor home” that cost as much as a small house. 
Questions: Thoughts on C vs A?  Any preferences on brand or models? 

Option 2: 5 year old gas C or A.
Pros: Newer.  Could get something higher end.  Cons: No air ride. 
Questions: What would be considered a high end gas coach make model wise?

Option 3: 10-15 year old diesel pusher.
Pros: Diesel.  Air ride.  Seems to be more solid construction.  Cons:  Older
Questions:  I have watched videos and read articles about diesel vs gas and it pretty much says that one is not necessarily better than the other, it depends on what your going to do with it.  But when I talk to actual owners in post most swear by diesel.  So is diesel better when we are talking used? And if so same as above, what makes and models should I be looking for?

RedandSilver

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  • Posts: 1024
You are an example of what I see here pretty often.

You have upgraded a few times and now want to do it again, right?

If you want to get off the upgrade merry go round then buy a bigger unit this time so you don't need to upgrade
anytime soon if ever again.  Class A.

I bought a 15 yo coach last year and it's just shy of 40' and has a 350hp diesel engine.  I wouldn't want anything smaller and I'm alone.
I spent less then the low end of your used budget and feel I did alright as a new Pick Up Truck could cost more.

Usually speaking a diesel will last longer - however they cost more to start with and are a little more maintenance compared to a gas unit.
The diesels will be quieter as most are in the rear vs. the gas engines up front.  They also turn slower (less RPM's) than a gas unit.

Used is the only way to go IMO unless you have money to burn and time to waste as many new one's need service from the get go.

Make and model are not as important as overall condition and if the floorplan suites you and (I assume) your wife.
You should be able to get to the kitchen and bathroom with the slides closed.  I wouldn't look at a unit that didn't have at least 2 slides.

Many people that have a bigger MH tow a car or truck behind them so they can use that when the MH is parked and it easier to drive
a smaller vehicle somewhere instead of the coach.  Another reason for a diesel - it's usually easier to tow with a diesel.
 
Hope that helps some.
2002 Rexhall Rose Air  Cummins 8.3  350hp

Sun2Retire

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I have a diesel and they’re great insofar as noise. However, for the amount of driving you’re planning (sounds like not a lot) I would lean towards a newer (used) 3-4 slide gas unit - spend the money on the “house”. You’ll never grow out of it. Find one with good cargo capacity and the ability to tow 5000 lbs. In your budget you can get the coach and a nice used toad setup for towing.
Scott
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 3810, Spartan, Cat C7 350 "OURVEE"
Eezrv TPMS, VMSpc, 800W Solar
2002 Dodge RAM 1500 Quad Cab "RTOAD"
Stowmaster towbar & Brakemaster

Kevin Means

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IMO, both responses are correct, but I think you should ask yourself why you're considering a diesel coach. They're definitely quieter on the road, because the engine is so far behind you, they're generally a bit heavier duty than gas coaches and they're the only game in town if you're looking at something over 38 feet.

Diesel coaches usually have a higher towing capacity than gas coaches and you will usually get up the hills a little faster in a diesel coach, but not by a lot. When it comes to towing, I doubt you would notice any significant differences between a diesel coach and a gas coach, unless you frequently drove on mountain grades. I will say, however, that the engine brakes found in a lot of diesel coaches are a great feature when descending grades.

Used diesel coaches usually cost more than used gas coaches of the same age, but that price difference often gets smaller as they get much older. A lot of it has to do with how well the coach was maintained. And there's no doubt that diesel coaches are more expensive to maintain. You can usually buy a used gas motorhome, that's several years newer than a used diesel motorhome, for the same amount of money.

Kev
« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 03:51:50 PM by Kevin Means »
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
Towing a Jeep Rubicon Unlimited LJ or an Acura MDX
RVI Brake 2, Minder TM-66 TPMS, 970 watts of solar
(Can't wait to spend more time RVing)
Lakeside, California

Gary RV_Wizard

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Quote
Would be purchasing an “entry level motor home” that cost as much as a small house. 

It IS a small house, right? Forget the vehicle part - you are house shopping!

A nice diesel pusher is indeed smoother and quieter and more capable overall, but just because it is better doesn't mean it the gas coach is no good. I would focus more on the size and layout needed than the chassis type, at least initially.

I'm biased towards a Class A in any size above about 28 ft. In my opinion, a C larger than that is pretty much overloaded from the git-go. The only advantage of a C vs A is the familiar driver position and dash area. Just about everything else about an A is going to be superior, e.g. ride, capacity, storage space, etc.

Gas vs diesel is harder, but why worry until you decide what size and layout meets your needs? If you end up looking at 28-30 ft rigs, diesel is probably not a contender anyway. And if 38+, diesel is probably the only answer.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

ArdraF

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Quote
...they're the only game in town if you're looking at something over 38 feet.

That's generally true of newer motorhomes but we had a 1999 Monaco Windsor DP that was 34 feet long and they had the same model in 32 feet (too small in my opinion).  Our 34 footer had a great layout with one slide and we put many miles on it before upgrading to our current 40 foot Monaco Executive DP.  With it we towed first a Geo Tracker and then a Jeep Grand Cherokee.  It had the 350 hp Cummins engine.  Loved it but needs and wants changed.  ;)

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Gary RV_Wizard

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My point is that there are diesel rigs shorter than 38 ft, but there are no gas motorhomes longer than that. In a class A, the gas vs diesel choice basically exists only between 31 ft and 37 ft.

In the Class C world, you have some choice of diesel vs gas under 30 ft, but that is basically just engine type and not as complex a decision as with the larger diesel pushers. There are also "Super-C" front engine diesels, which might suit Eugenius' fancy.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Spring Creek

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Make sure you drive a Class A (rent is best) before you decide that is the way to go.  Many (most?) would prefer the Class A.  Best to find out you prefer a Class C before you buy a Class A and trust what "most" people like....it can be a real money saver  :'(

With regards to a Class C being overloaded from the start; that is not entirely true and depends on what you bring with you.  Fully loaded with gear/water/fuel we are 500 lbs. under at each axle.  A lot?  No, but I am not overloaded.  That is with (2) people and no pets.  Add two or three more people plus clothes (especially my daughters ::) ) and yes, we'd be over.

Good luck!
Kurt
2018 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 31K - 2011 Equinox

 

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