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Author Topic: Leaning towards new  (Read 798 times)

eugenius

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Leaning towards new
« on: October 23, 2017, 10:02:04 PM »
I posted on here a few weeks back looking for advice.  I am looking at upgrading in a big way from my 93 23 footer to something newer and bigger.  The wife is leaning towards new.  I'm on the fence.  We are looking at 17 Thor Hurricane.   Any advice on them?   I have an under 100k budget and I'm shooting for mid 80s.   Looking for a 35ish ft A.   Is hurricane just a cheaper unit?  Or is it just crazy marked down because 18s are out?  It's about 3k cheaper than the ace.   I can't even really look that hard at other coaches because they jump to 100k quick and it's really hard to justify that when we already like the the hurricane.  So am I crazy for going new?  And is the Hurricane a good coach?  Should I shop around when it's 10-20k less or is that small potatoes in the grand scheme of things.

NewmanRacing

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2017, 08:18:17 AM »
when it's 10-20k less or is that small potatoes in the grand scheme of things.

I can buy a large quantity of potatoes with $20,000.

Cash or finance?

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SeilerBird

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2017, 08:34:06 AM »
Being as that is your first big RV I suggest not spending more than $20k on your first unit. You really don't have any idea what you really want and the odds of getting the wrong one are very strong. In a year when you go to upgrade your $80k RV will lose more than $20k in depreciation. Here is a clean looking 2000 Itaska 35 footer for $18k that would work just fine for a beginning RV. Can't loose too much trading it in. I am not suggesting this particular unit, just using it to show you what you can get for a lot less money.

https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/used-rvs-for-sale/class-a/2000-itasca-sunflyer_rv-37039
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 09:32:44 AM »
The Hurricane is indeed a "cheaper unit", aka "entry level". It may be entirely adequate for light duty use and is certainly a big step up from your '93.  There are better made and better equipped models, of course, but they are gonna cost more.    RVs are extremely price competitive, so units with a similar MSRP will be very similar in equipment and design/build quality. However, I would encourage you to look at models in the same price class from other manufacturers, maybe Tiffin, Winnebago, or Forest River/Coachmen.

A used coach is financially a much better proposition, both in terms of absolute cost and the value for your dollar. A used motorhome is often lightly used and typically low mileage. It's more like a previously-owned house than the iconic "used car". For $50-$75k you can get one of the better models and maybe just 4-5 years old.
Gary
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Kevin Means

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2017, 03:04:45 PM »
Thank goodness there are those who buy new RVs. When we bought our current MH, we figured we saved about $30,000 in depreciation, because the coach was a year and a half old. Even so, it was like new, with less than 12,000 miles on the clock.

Neither the washer, dryer, microwave oven, dishwasher or shower (yes, even the shower) had ever been used. And consider this... At $3.50 a gallon, $30,000 buys 8571 gallons of diesel fuel, and averaging 7.2 MPG, we could take a 60,000 mile trip (Maybe break it up into a few trips :).)

My point is, RVs will depreciate by age alone. Their condition has (almost) nothing to do with it. RVs that are only a year or so old, are often in as good, or better, condition than a shiny new one, because all the bugs (or most of them) have probably been fixed.  So, are you "crazy" for buying new? Well, no, but maybe a bit deranged. ;)

Kev
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
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SargeW

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2017, 06:41:15 PM »
I am the voice of dissent. I have always bought new, and probably always will.  Will you pay more for new? Sure. But buying new gets you all the stuff you wanted, and not was someone else had. You may get a gently used bargain like Kev did, or you may wind up with a nightmare that someone else unloaded. 

When I buy new I get to go over the unit with a fine tooth comb, and reject anything I find wrong. I get the year warranty to make them fix anything that goes wrong. And I get to be the first one sleeping in the bed, taking a shower, and driving it on my first trip.  The tires won't need replacing, and I will know what maintenance is done. And I pay for that privilege. 

And my current rig I ordered and had built. That was the best thing I ever did with a RV. I ordered it exactly as I wanted it, and eliminated the things that I didn't want. And it was cheaper than buying  one off a dealer lot (that had been sitting there for a unknown length of time). 

So yep, I have a different point of view when it comes to RV's!
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ArdraF

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2017, 06:57:19 PM »
We also happen to like new and don't worry about depreciation because we've kept every motorhome we've owned for a good number of years.  By the time we sell, depreciation is not a factor and like Marty we like being first to sleep in that bed, etc.

My question echoes another.  Are you planning on cash or financing?  If financing, pay as much cash as you can and as get the smallest loan possible.  None of us can forecast the future and sadly disasters do happen, such as major health issues.  What I'm getting to is whether you can afford a loan payment if your financial situation changes suddenly and drastically.  If paying cash, then find the best one you can afford comfortably.

But, regardless of new vs. used or pay with cash or financing, get the one you LIKE BEST because that's the one you'll enjoy the most and will want to use.  If you settle for second best, you won't like it as well and won't want to use it as much.

ArdraF
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eugenius

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2017, 09:13:28 PM »
I will be financing the coach new or used.  I have some cash saved up but I prefer to keep it liquid.  My wife and I both make good money and I had a wacky idea a few years ago to build our house my self.  The only major bills we have is our cars so we are pretty sound making the note.  And I've just re cently started a side business that has a limited use for the RV and I can justify paying the note out of that account as long as said business makes money for it.  I've been combing RV trader and plan on going to PPL tomorrow to see what's out there.  It looks like 50k gets you a 2010 ish and it goes up or down from there based on age.  Everyone says they take 20+k hit when they drive out the door which I believe but it's easy to say, all the ones I've found with a 20k hit are 2-3 model years old.  I don't know what it's worth but we like the outdoor kitchen and drop down bed that's pretty much standard on the newer ones.  So bang for buck I'm looking brand new vs 50k or below.  I'm in the Houston area if it helps.

JudyJB

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2017, 02:58:31 AM »
I also bought my first motorhome new and am very happy that I did so.  Yes, there was a little depreciation but I bought it at a good discount because it had been used a couple of times in a show, but the mattress and everything had been protected with plastic.   

Not only am I allergic to dogs and cigarette smoke, but I like having a new mattress that no one has slept in, and I don't have to clean up someone else's messes.  Yes, I had some warranty issues, but those were MY warranty issues, not something someone else had broken.  I also knew the fresh water tank had no gunk in it from someone else's mistakes. 

Also, everyone says you will not be happy with your first RV, but I knew what I wanted and am very happy with the floor plan I chose. 
Full-timing for over five years in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N

SeilerBird

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2017, 04:30:20 AM »
Also, everyone says you will not be happy with your first RV, but I knew what I wanted and am very happy with the floor plan I chose.
What I always say is that MOST people do not get their first purchase right. I say that because of the number of times I have read about people trading in after their first year. It is extremely common. Most don't do three months or more of shopping and buy on impulse. Impulse buying an RV is a recipe for a disaster. If you were smart enough to take your time and get it right then my hat is off to you.
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Ernie n Tara

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2017, 08:52:13 AM »
I bought the first one well used (and impeccably maintained). The second was at the depths of the crisis and three model years old. The price was excellent and the MH served us well. The third we identified exactly what we wanted, went to Lazy Days and asked Sharon Harmon (rec. by Gary) to find one for us. She did; it was two model years old and had 4, 000+ miles on it.

All three were well suited for our needs, in excellent condition, and served us well. No real, problems, although the newest had the most. My point is any approach can work well if you're careful and give some thought to your CURRENT needs. A lot of the turnover is due to changing needs, not bad choices! We went from a 15 year old 22 ft class A (200 sq. ft.) to a 34 ft., three slide diesel pusher (400 sq. ft.) with a 32 ft Class A double slide gas MH between them and never were dissatisfied with a choice.

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
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JSplaine

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2017, 09:12:39 AM »
There have been many comments on quality of new motorhomes today, a lot not good. I met a couple going south last year with a brand new Winnebago. They were headed for Coburg, OR. factory service center with a 81 item hit list. Please look at used as most all the bugs have been fixed by the third to fifth year. There a lot of those available with low miles, and lots of life still I'm them.
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Spring Creek

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2017, 11:52:27 AM »
We've purchased (3) new. While we did have many, many issues with number 2 (which is why we have number 3  :P) I'd buy new again.

We got what we want, we have a year warranty, and it's highly likely there are not any skeletons in the closet, so to speak (like, someone hit a rock on the interstate, ran it out of oil till it locked up, waited for it to cool down, then changed the oil and gave it a good tradin').

And, when buying used, where's the guarantee that just because the hit list was taken care of by the first owner, they'll never be any other things go wrong?

Buying new or used is really a personal choice and I don't feel there's anything wrong with either approach.  Hard to argue that it's cheaper to buy used.

Go with what YOU are most comfortable with.



Kurt
2018 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 31K - 2011 Equinox

SeilerBird

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #13 on: October 25, 2017, 12:15:23 PM »
And, when buying used, where's the guarantee that just because the hit list was taken care of by the first owner, they'll never be any other things go wrong?
No one said there was a guarantee. What we are saying is there is a lot less issues with a three year old than with a new one. And with warranty work you are at the mercy of the dealership. Some are very good, others take months to fix simple things and then still don't get it fixed right or break something else. I have read many horror stories over the last ten years.
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blw2

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2017, 03:39:15 PM »
I'm not opposed to use personally, but we bought new.
mainly because we found a used one we liked on a dealer lot, used but just barely.  In searching to verify I got a good enough deal, i found a new one, same year model, same floor plan, sitting on a dealer lot.  Since they were tired of holding it they sold it for almost as low as I was getting the used one for.

I like that I didn't have to worry about anyone else's dirt except for ours....especially black tank and such....but that wouldn't have been a show stopper for me.
I was wondering if the warranty added value.  I'm still not sure
on one hand we did have a few warranty claims, one very major and significant
but on the other hand, the used one would presumably have had most or all of those bugs worked out already
but on the other hand, maybe the used one was a lemon....or some of those bugs had been worked out to a substandard level....
   (didn't know I had three hands, did ya?)
Brad (DW + 3 kids)
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UTTransplant

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2017, 05:42:54 PM »
We have bought trailers both new and used. I know trailers are less sophisticated than motorhomes (no engine!) but we were happy with each one we got. We kept each for 3-5 years, and we only changed due to changing family situations (more kids, kids moving out, retirement). Since the OP already has a motorhomes, I doubt he/she will make a dreadful decision. I know we are pretty set on what the must-have and nice-to-have lists are for our next purchase (we will need something larger when we stay in the RV for 3-4 months at a time). I admit that when we buy used, the first thing we do is toss the mattress and put a new one in. The second thing is a super deep cleaning both inside and out. All seams get examined after cleaning just to make sure we didn't miss anything. We have been in various trailers for 30 years, and after this long we are pretty comfortable fixing just about anything that can go wrong with a new or used unit. As for engine and chassis issues, I wouldn't buy a used motor home without a complete inspection at a truck specialist.

The reason we are looking for a 3-5 year motorhomes in the next 3 years or so because I have expensive tastes! I really want one with a MSRP of $300-350K, and I am just too cheap to buy one. Yes, I know he real price will must significantly less than the MSRP, but getting on at $150-200K will be a lot nicer. Now to the fun of looking for the right one...
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KandT

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2017, 06:06:34 AM »
Nothing wrong with either decision in my opinion.  Nice to be the first to use everything if you buy new!  Nice to have much more of a coach if you buy used.  Some would say I crazy to buy a 2005 coach when I could have nearly bought a new one for the price but when I look under it and see how it is built and the fact that it is a diesel pusher, I made the right choice for me.  i would take an old Cat over a new gas any day of the week but I happen to like heavy equipment and the people that say anyone can work on the Ford chassis make a good point (well a lot more people anyways).

If you can afford "The Works" like Sarge in a brand new and built for you then you have the best of both worlds!  I can't right now but that doesn't stop me from being thankful and happy with what I have!
2005 Winnebago Vectra
American Car Dolly
2009 Accord Toad
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Mile High

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2017, 12:57:22 PM »
If I had Marti's money I would get new! :)

Serious though, nothing wrong with new.  Our last 5er and pickup were bought brand new and they served us well.  The only drawback on new was dealing with those phony RV factory warranties and the lip service from the Dealer.

The MH is the first RV in years we bought used, mainly because of the high dollar.  It actually worked out so well I figured I would get a used Wrangler to replace my very used 1997 Wrangler, and that also has worked out extremely well.
Brad and Dory
2013 Winnebago Itasca Meridian 42E (new to us 2016)
2013 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
FMCA 457993 / WIT W170238
Denver, CO

garyb1st

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #18 on: October 28, 2017, 02:08:11 PM »
And consider this... At $3.50 a gallon, $30,000 buys 8571 gallons of diesel fuel, and averaging 7.2 MPG, we could take a 60,000 mile trip (Maybe break it up into a few trips :).)
Kev

Define few trips.   ;)
Gary B1st

2005 Pace Arrow 35G
2016 Jeep Wrangler

eugenius

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2017, 10:30:14 PM »
Well after some deliberation we are going with the 2018 Thor Hurricane 31S.  I drove it.  I called around to a few dealers and quoted it out.  We are getting a decent deal. I talked to a friend who bought one from the same dealer and he's been very happy with them.  So we will take the plunge.  In the end it was few features that sold us like an outdoor kitchen and the front lowering bunk that are really only on newer coaches.  I'll keep everyone posted with how it goes and the experience.  I will say this.  I had never driven an A before.  I've heard people say their wives can't drive them that's why they go C etc.  Honestly.  It was a 20 minute ride.  Minutes 1-5 in the parking lot we're okish.  5-10 we're terrifying. You don't really get understand what it's gonna be like until you do it.  I've driven my C alot, my daily driver is 250 long bed, I've driven a 550, heavy equipment, and box trucks bigger than this A for days on end.  But..   being that far from the windshield was a new one.  Granted once I got it on the freeway and through some traffic I was feeling much better.  It drove really well tho lol. 

KandT

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Re: Leaning towards new
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2017, 08:51:02 PM »
Enjoy your new rig!!  I felt like our A is easier to drive than our former C and my wife hopped in and drove it just fine.  The hard job of the husband is not shouting orders and panicking.  Unless there is an accident to avoid, I like to look at my phone.  We both know I am paying attention to every detail but the phone gives me a buffer to hovering. ;)
2005 Winnebago Vectra
American Car Dolly
2009 Accord Toad
It's not a problem.  It's a project!

 

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