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Author Topic: Setting the tire pressure  (Read 477 times)

larrypowellnc

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Setting the tire pressure
« on: October 24, 2017, 11:57:04 AM »
This time of year we are getting cold temps in the morning and warm temps in the afternoon.  I'm wondering what time of day to set my tire pressure.  I have seen tire pressure change at much as 5 to 10 psi from morning to afternoon due to the change in air temp. 

Old Blevins

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2017, 01:26:32 PM »
 This may not be useful to you, but my solution to the problem was to replace my trailers load class C tires with load class D.   That way I could be sure of having the necessary pressure at their coldest without exceeding their maximum pressure specification when it warmed up.  Also, I like having a little reserve load capacity in my tires.
Jim
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2006 Arctic Fox 29V
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FastEagle

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2017, 01:41:25 PM »
Speaking as an RV traveler, I recommend using the recommended tire pressures found on the tire placard as a guide for servicing before every travel day.
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grashley

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 07:38:33 PM »
Agreed.   Set the pressure to the proper  level before your day's travel, regardless of time of day or temp, and do not reduce pressure when it warms up!  This is not a real exact science where 5 or 10 psi change from the base during the day will affect much.  What will affect tire performance is low pressure!
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Arch Hoagland

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2017, 01:12:35 AM »
In the fall when it hits about 40 degrees I set my tire pressures. Then when summer arrives and it hits about 80 degrees I set them again. I check them all the time on trips but never add or remove air.

We've been on trips where we saw 40 to 105 degrees.  If I changed tire pressure every day I would not be a happy camper.
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thomasamski

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2017, 08:13:48 PM »
I fill all my tires to 95 psi. That seems to work best for my rig.  I check air pressure before each trip. Been doing this for years with no issues.
2011 Fleetwood Southwind pulling a 2010 Chevrolet HHR

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2017, 04:05:50 PM »
Quote
I'm wondering what time of day to set my tire pressure.  I have seen tire pressure change at much as 5 to 10 psi from morning to afternoon due to the change in air temp. 

Time of day makes no difference, nor does the ambient temperature.   Set the tire pressure before you drive on the tires - that is the meaning of "cold" in tire lingo.  Yes, the tire psi will rise as the tire heats up, but you should neither worry about that nor try to anticipate it.  The tire engineers already took that into account when they designed the tire.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

OLDRACER

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Re: Setting the tire pressure
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2017, 01:47:06 PM »
I set my tire pressures in the morning before a trip  before the sun hits the ones on that side. There is a pressure difference with a cooler tire.

An IR temp gauge makes a good quick check of tire heat which will rise with a soft tire, but you need to have a good idea what temps are normal.

I have yet to pressure check all my tires without losing enough air to wish I had a compressor to refill.

 

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