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Author Topic: Heat?  (Read 601 times)

ditsjets7

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Heat?
« on: November 15, 2017, 12:22:06 PM »
Hi all, we have a 31 foot Coachman Class C. We are going away on Friday. Is it safe or even possible to run the furnace while driving? I suspect the answer to this is "no" but I wanted to be sure. Thank you.

Mike

SeilerBird

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 12:24:08 PM »
Yes it is possible. I personally turn the propane off while driving but most people here think it is a fine idea.
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muskoka guy

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 01:05:36 PM »
I have driven many miles with the furnace on. Being from Canada, when we leave for the south in January, we run the furnace the whole time. The dash heat isnt enough to keep the coach warm. I also leave on the fridge on propane as well as the hot water if I am using it. They were designed for travelling. Some tunnels request that you shut off propane, as well as ferry crossings. Other than that, you are good to go.

Mile High

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 06:46:57 PM »
It be a cold beast back there without the furnace!  If its not too cold the heat pumps work, or sometimes the fireplace, otherwise it's the furnace(s).
Brad and Dory
2013 Winnebago Itasca Meridian 42E (new to us 2016)
2013 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
FMCA 457993 / WIT W170238
Denver, CO

billwild

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 07:22:36 PM »
After years of using just the dash heat and a blanket in our class A diesel, we started using a small ceramic heater plugged into the wall. Finally we started using the furnace with no problems at all. We as well travelled down from Canada in some very cold winter weather. You need the heat on, and the propane lasts a long time so that is good.


Bill

donn

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 07:32:13 PM »
Can you do it?  Sure.  Will the furnace work?  Doubtful.  Wind will more than likely blow the flame out before you get any heat.

WILDEBILL308

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 08:28:31 PM »
Hi all, we have a 31 foot Coachman Class C. We are going away on Friday. Is it safe or even possible to run the furnace while driving? I suspect the answer to this is "no" but I wanted to be sure. Thank you.

Mike
Mike, absolutely, In colder weather I always have the furnace on when traveling.
 I would turn on the hot water heater to. Your wife will like having hot water when she wants to wash her hands. ;)  I also have the refrigerator on.
Have a good trip.
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
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WILDEBILL308

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 08:31:36 PM »
Can you do it?  Sure.  Will the furnace work?  Doubtful.  Wind will more than likely blow the flame out before you get any heat.
Never had a problem. What coach do you have that has that problem?
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

JudyJB

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 08:32:48 PM »
One consideration is that if you are driving in below zero weather, and your unit has not been winterized, your pipes will freeze.  My furnace ducts down to the water pump and tanks, so if I were to drive in below zero weather, keeping the furnace on prevents freezing of pipes. 

Also, I always drive with refrigerator running on propane and never had the flame blow out.  I can see where it might be possible for that to happen, depending on the design.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 08:34:24 PM by JudyJB »
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John From Detroit

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2017, 06:43:55 AM »
There are two dangers running a Furnace (or other Propane appliance) on the road..
One Is mostly history. that is "Blow out" modern Propane appliances are DSI (Direct Spark Ignition) and have flame sensors that .. Should the flame blow out.. They will go through a shut down (Purges any remaining unburned propane) and re-light...  Older pilot light types might not do this at least the pilot may not turn off (main burner will have a sensor)

The other danger is in a very specific accident you could rupture a propane line and have a fire.  Safety valves in the tank also minimize that danger.

So...  If needed.. I'd do it.. I do run with fridge on.
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NY_Dutch

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2017, 08:06:25 AM »
Can you do it?  Sure.  Will the furnace work?  Doubtful.  Wind will more than likely blow the flame out before you get any heat.

Have you ever felt the force of the "wind" created by the furnace fan at the outside exhaust vent? It would take a prevailing wind much stronger than I'm comfortable driving in to overcome the existing air flow.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
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tommy g

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2017, 05:49:33 PM »
Can you do it?  Sure.  Will the furnace work?  Doubtful.  Wind will more than likely blow the flame out before you get any heat.
Sorry my friend but by this thinking, your furnace would blow out on a windy night in the park.
1998 Bounder 36s 460 V8 Ford
pushed by 2005 Accord

Spring Creek

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2017, 09:37:44 PM »
We've driven 5000-6000 miles with the furnace on and no issues. At least 500 miles last year when it was mid-teens F.

That doesn't mean you can't have issues and that it is intrinsically safe.
Kurt
2018 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 31K - 2011 Equinox

WILDEBILL308

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2017, 10:08:55 PM »
One consideration is that if you are driving in below zero weather, and your unit has not been winterized, your pipes will freeze.  My furnace ducts down to the water pump and tanks, so if I were to drive in below zero weather, keeping the furnace on prevents freezing of pipes. 

Also, I always drive with refrigerator running on propane and never had the flame blow out.  I can see where it might be possible for that to happen, depending on the design.
I use to drive all the time with the refrigerator on propane. Now I can't, because I switched out to a residential. ;) Makes lots of ice cubes going down the road. ;D
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2017, 08:48:54 AM »
I've seen a few reports of a furnace blowing out during travel or in high winds while parked, but I would say it's the exception. The furnace flame is in an enclosed burner, so the only effect of external wind is to maybe speed or retard combustion air intake and exhaust abit. Any potential effect would depend on the location of the furnace external air vent and the way wind eddies around that part the RV, so one RV might have a problem even though most work fine.
Gary
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aboatguy

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2017, 06:01:07 PM »
Mike, absolutely, In colder weather I always have the furnace on when traveling.
 I would turn on the hot water heater to. Your wife will like having hot water when she wants to wash her hands. ;)  I also have the refrigerator on.
Have a good trip.
Bill

+1  never had trouble using the propane heater while on the road.  Dash heat doesn't always cut it and if its below freezing dash heat doesn't keep the basement warm.  Using the installed house systems while out on the road is no big deal that's why they were installed.

A Traveler

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2017, 09:32:28 PM »
Can you do it?  Sure.  Will the furnace work?  Doubtful.  Wind will more than likely blow the flame out before you get any heat.

Absolutely ridiculous.

It's a motor HOME. In my sticks and bricks home, 72 degrees is comfortable. I just spent two days on the road running in 30 and 40 degree outside temps. Ran the dash heat and both furnaces. Never got below 72 degrees in the motor HOME. Very comfortable driving in shirt sleeves...no jacket.

I run both furnaces 100% of the time when driving in cold weather. I have never had a problem.

JoelP

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2017, 10:21:05 PM »
Before doing this take a look at where the propane line goes as it leaves your tank.  In my current RV it is immediately behind my rear wheels.  If you have ever had a blowout you would think twice about what might happen if you were to have a blowout with your propane line pressurized and in close proximity.  One of my blowouts, in my prior Class C RV, did considerable damage to my underside.  There is little doubt a propane line could have been severed.
Joel from San Jose

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Ernie n Tara

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2017, 06:59:16 AM »
That line has about 0.5 PSI in it and is protected against sudden high flows by cutting off the propane at the tank. Unlikely to cause a big problem.

Ernie


Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
2012 Jeep Rubicon - Dozer (orange - kinda)
2006 Jeep Wrangler

JoelP

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2017, 08:55:40 AM »
That line has about 0.5 PSI in it and is protected against sudden high flows by cutting off the propane at the tank. Unlikely to cause a big problem.

Ernie

Good to know that it isn't high flow, but I'm still am not inclined to risk a rupture, even for a low pressure line.  My line is literally 3 inches from the rear tires. If it were to be punctured  and doesn't have a sudden large enough flow to trigger a shutoff could it not still feed a fire?
Joel from San Jose

2010 Itasca Suncruiser 37F
8.1L Chevy Workhorse with Banks PowerPack
2016 CMax Energi Hybrid dinghy

NY_Dutch

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2017, 09:50:30 AM »
Good to know that it isn't high flow, but I'm still am not inclined to risk a rupture, even for a low pressure line.  My line is literally 3 inches from the rear tires. If it were to be punctured  and doesn't have a sudden large enough flow to trigger a shutoff could it not still feed a fire?

Yes it could, so why not just add a simple shield in front of it for your peace of mind? Something as easy as a length of aluminum angle stock would do a good job, even against a chunk of common road debris that might puncture the line. Then you can lose sleep over that 40-50 PSI fuel line that runs all the way from the gas tank to the engine. I don't suggest trying to go anywhere with that one shut off... ;)
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

Mile High

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2017, 11:16:21 AM »
Or just reroute the LP line if you are worried.  Not only would the LP have to leak, but the tank overflow would have to fail it would have to collect in a low point and reach it's lower explosive limit AND have an ignition source.  You would really have to be having a bad day to have one of those hollywood explosions.   
Brad and Dory
2013 Winnebago Itasca Meridian 42E (new to us 2016)
2013 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
FMCA 457993 / WIT W170238
Denver, CO

JoelP

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Re: Heat?
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2017, 03:48:25 PM »
Yes it could, so why not just add a simple shield in front of it for your peace of mind? Something as easy as a length of aluminum angle stock would do a good job, even against a chunk of common road debris that might puncture the line. Then you can lose sleep over that 40-50 PSI fuel line that runs all the way from the gas tank to the engine. I don't suggest trying to go anywhere with that one shut off... ;)

My wife often tells me I worry too much.  I don't worry about that gas line since it is not directly behind the wheel, but I like your aluminum shield idea.

I once had the experience in my Acura TL near Portland of passing a truck loaded with flattened cars when one fell off directly in front of me in the passing lane.  There was no avoiding it, but it was so incredibly flat that I was able to drive over it.  A week later I read about a woman in a minivan that had a piece of scrap metal in the road rupture her tank which caused a serious fire. I guess I am just luckier.
Joel from San Jose

2010 Itasca Suncruiser 37F
8.1L Chevy Workhorse with Banks PowerPack
2016 CMax Energi Hybrid dinghy

 

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