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Author Topic: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road  (Read 1772 times)

Jim Godward

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #30 on: November 28, 2017, 05:20:50 PM »
I got a look in person at an Inogen portable yesterday and they sure are nice looking and small.  Anybody have their portable concentrator fail while on the road?  Thanks

Bill

Bill,
I had the Imogen portable for over 18 months with no problems.  Imogen will overnight parts or new concentrator if there is a problem.  I always had a tank in case of power or other failures.

OOPs, I should have read  all the latest messages before responding. 

BTW, one of my other brothers said that the concentrator my deceased
 Bro had was from Phillips.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 05:24:37 PM by Jim Godward »
Jim
Jim & Pat Godward
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Hillsboro, Oregon

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2017, 03:54:16 AM »
My DH uses a regular concentrator. If he needs it while we are on the road, I just start up the generator and run it. If he is using it when we are ready to head out, he has a battery jumper/car starter thing that he plugs the concentrator into. It will power that concentrator for at least 10 hours (we've use it over night).  We have a couple of small tanks of O2 for emergencies, and he could use them, but there really isnt a need with the concentrator.

When we were in Minnesota and he had private insurance, the company who supplied the concentrator had a loaner that we could get for travelling. There are a couple different brands. They come with a couple of batteries, an adapter for the cigarette lighter and also a normal plug for the wall socket. It weighed half as much and also consumed less energy to run it. Now he gets it through hospice and they dont have anything like that.

As far as the portable ones failing... thats what the emergency tanks are for.  ;)
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Buddy the Dog-  Soul Mutt, forever in our hearts.


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Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2017, 06:29:36 AM »
My DH uses a regular concentrator. If he needs it while we are on the road, I just start up the generator and run it. If he is using it when we are ready to head out, he has a battery jumper/car starter thing that he plugs the concentrator into. It will power that concentrator for at least 10 hours (we've use it over night).  We have a couple of small tanks of O2 for emergencies, and he could use them, but there really isnt a need with the concentrator.

When we were in Minnesota and he had private insurance, the company who supplied the concentrator had a loaner that we could get for travelling. There are a couple different brands. They come with a couple of batteries, an adapter for the cigarette lighter and also a normal plug for the wall socket. It weighed half as much and also consumed less energy to run it. Now he gets it through hospice and they dont have anything like that.

As far as the portable ones failing... thats what the emergency tanks are for.  ;)

Yesterday while at my supplier exchanging regulators they showed me a portable Eclipse concentrator that they loan out for up to two weeks.  But they told me I better have it reserved at least 3 months in advance.  It is quite a bit smaller than the home unit and weighs about half as much but has all the capabilities of a home unit.  Just for fun I priced it out on the internet - $2900-$3200 - Yikes.  So there is one possibility for a short trip.  One comment they made is that this portable is very capable for overnight use whereas most of the shoulder carry portables are not.  (But they advertise as being good for up to 8 hours).  Anyway, I am learning a lot about this subject through this thread.  Please keep those cards and letters coming.....lol

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
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Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2017, 06:32:52 AM »
Bill,
I had the Imogen portable for over 18 months with no problems.  Imogen will overnight parts or new concentrator if there is a problem.  I always had a tank in case of power or other failures.

OOPs, I should have read  all the latest messages before responding. 

BTW, one of my other brothers said that the concentrator my deceased
 Bro had was from Phillips.

Jim,
     Did you use your Inogen overnight while on the road?  Regardless of what I have I plan on carrying tanks and finding places to have them filled before leaving.  Haven't found the Phillips concentrators yet.  I have also been meaning to mention that now that I am on oxygen while sleeping I find that I sleep like a rock, something that I have not done in years.  I guess a little O2 helps you snooze.....lol

Bill
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 06:49:40 AM by Bill N »
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Jim Godward

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2017, 02:42:10 PM »
Jim,
     Did you use your Inogen overnight while on the road?  Regardless of what I have I plan on carrying tanks and finding places to have them filled before leaving.  Haven't found the Phillips concentrators yet.  I have also been meaning to mention that now that I am on oxygen while sleeping I find that I sleep like a rock, something that I have not done in years.  I guess a little O2 helps you snooze.....lol

Bill,

No, I cheated by arranging my schedule so that we were at lower altitudes at night.  If you check altitudes while traveling between Bozeman MT and Portland OR, you can chose night stops below 3,000' which is/was my critical altitude at the time.  I did have the house and portable concentrators with me in case we didn't make our planned stops.  I did use the portable unit when we crossed mountains by having it hooked up to the batteries.
Jim
Jim & Pat Godward
AC7PO & KD7ZDM
Hillsboro, Oregon

catblaster

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #35 on: November 29, 2017, 07:12:42 PM »
My oxygen supplier tells me they do not use the water bottle because it caused a lot of trouble.  The machine is equipped with a place for one but since they do not use it, I don't have it.  Not sure of the purpose unless it is to inject humidity into the oxygen.

By the way, I did go in today and swapped regulators to one that can go either continuous or pulse.  That adds a lot of time to the bottles.

Bill

   The water bottle is only to add humidity, it is, however, going to be necessary if you have to increase your use of oxygen. I went from 2 liters to 15 liters in 8 months.  IF I remember right the maximum you can get from a regulator is 7 liters so they would hook two bottles together with a modified stethoscope to provide 15 liters while exercising in the rehab clinic.  Get the bottle if you can, I had nose bleeds from the higher levels, the oxygen will dry out your mucus membranes so much that a nosebleed became a way of life for me.

    Wish you were closer, I have several demand regulators sitting here that I dont use anymore. I like to keep one "just in case".  I looked into a portable concentrator but no one would help pay for it and by the time I saved up monies, my needs had exceeded the amount it would put out. Hope that does not become your situation. Then I went to liquid oxygen which is a real pain to travel with, constantly running low in the Florida heat.

   I have one/two suggestions for you if you are using oxygen with a CPAP at night for sleeping. Do NOT increase the number of liters/minute. That can be very detrimental as I found out one night. Stay with the recommended amount, this is one case where "more is NOT better". The reasons why are a little hard for me to explain. Stay on your oxygen and monitor your levels, O2 levels that are too low will damage heart muscles and other organs. In the event, you get a transplant (don't know if you have considered it) you will have a better chance of surviving.
     
   
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 07:14:17 PM by catblaster »
Will and Jane
95 Winnebago Luxor

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2017, 06:49:54 AM »
Bill,

No, I cheated by arranging my schedule so that we were at lower altitudes at night.  If you check altitudes while traveling between Bozeman MT and Portland OR, you can chose night stops below 3,000' which is/was my critical altitude at the time.  I did have the house and portable concentrators with me in case we didn't make our planned stops.  I did use the portable unit when we crossed mountains by having it hooked up to the batteries.

Jim you are a real fountain of information.  I had never considered altitudes but will now.  For the next year we don't have any mountain travel planned - mostly just straight north and south to visit our kids and their families in North Dakota, Minnesota and Ontario, Canada.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2017, 06:58:27 AM »
   The water bottle is only to add humidity, it is, however, going to be necessary if you have to increase your use of oxygen. I went from 2 liters to 15 liters in 8 months.  IF I remember right the maximum you can get from a regulator is 7 liters so they would hook two bottles together with a modified stethoscope to provide 15 liters while exercising in the rehab clinic.  Get the bottle if you can, I had nose bleeds from the higher levels, the oxygen will dry out your mucus membranes so much that a nosebleed became a way of life for me.

      I looked into a portable concentrator but no one would help pay for it and by the time I saved up monies, my needs had exceeded the amount it would put out. Hope that does not become your situation. Then I went to liquid oxygen which is a real pain to travel with, constantly running low in the Florida heat.

   I have one/two suggestions for you if you are using oxygen with a CPAP at night for sleeping. Do NOT increase the number of liters/minute. That can be very detrimental as I found out one night. Stay with the recommended amount, this is one case where "more is NOT better". The reasons why are a little hard for me to explain. Stay on your oxygen and monitor your levels, O2 levels that are too low will damage heart muscles and other organs. In the event, you get a transplant (don't know if you have considered it) you will have a better chance of surviving.
     
   

I am a rookie at using oxygen Will but your increase from 2 to 15 liters in 8 months is a real eye opener.  I have never heard of anyone using 15 liters.  I  only use 4 liters when exercising at pulmo rehab and that keeps me in good range.  Plus I do not use oxygen at all when at rest (watching TV/working on computer) during the day but am happy that most of the big box stores now provide electric carts for those who get winded easily (and have bad hips).

Don't use a CPAP so thankful for that and I was told not to increase the oxygen levels much above 3 liters and try to keep it at two.  I think the concentrator only goes to 5 or 6 liters.  I appreciate all the comments from you current users.  My military career taught me to always RTP (read the paper) regarding machine operation but I cannot believe that I have yet to receive an instruction sheet on any of this stuff but YouTube and this forum have covered that gap nicely.  Thanks again

Bill.
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

catblaster

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2017, 07:48:16 AM »
    Sorry Bill, I mislead you. I looked it back up and my paperwork said 7 L at rest and they tied two liquid oxy canisters together to get 14 L when I was on a treadmill. The small liquid oxy will output just a hair more than 7 each.

    I never had a problem with oxygen use around flames or heat when the normal precautions are used.  I still did many of the things I did before. Cooking was a challenge keeping the hose away from the burners (gas stove) and opening the oven was scary to others but I never caught fire. Welding was tricky since I would tie the hose behind me to keep sparks from burning a hole in it. That was with a 40' hose attached to the big liquid tank.

    It really saddens me now when I see someone on oxygen since I know what it was like and how disabling the disease can be, hope you never get to the stage I was in. Keep your strength up and exercise. 
Will and Jane
95 Winnebago Luxor

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2017, 09:38:17 AM »
Will I am surprised that you can get 14L in a nose cannula without a lot of discomfort.  I have often wondered if it is only the CPAP folks who use face masks.  Seems that 14L would be more manageable with a face mask and I see a couple of folks at rehab using them. 

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

catblaster

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2017, 11:21:41 AM »
     The 14L did come thru a face mask, that was only when I was exercising at rehab. The rest of the time I used a nasal cannula. The mayo clinic provided me with one that was a bit different, It has a disc-shaped chamber that the oxy flowed thru before going to the nose piece. I didn't notice any difference and I doubt it would work well with an on-demand regulator. that was back when I was on 2L and using a constant feed.

     14L is very uncomfortable, burns the nose and when coming from a liquid oxy tank it is also cold. The small portable tanks @7L will throw off a fog like vapor and several people had told me that my tank was smoking. It looked like it was ready to catch fire sometimes because of the high humidity.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 11:25:06 AM by catblaster »
Will and Jane
95 Winnebago Luxor

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2017, 06:42:36 AM »
     The 14L did come thru a face mask, that was only when I was exercising at rehab. The rest of the time I used a nasal cannula. The mayo clinic provided me with one that was a bit different, It has a disc-shaped chamber that the oxy flowed thru before going to the nose piece. I didn't notice any difference and I doubt it would work well with an on-demand regulator. that was back when I was on 2L and using a constant feed.

     14L is very uncomfortable, burns the nose and when coming from a liquid oxygen tank it is also cold. The small portable tanks @7L will throw off a fog like vapor and several people had told me that my tank was smoking. It looked like it was ready to catch fire sometimes because of the high humidity.

This thread is turning in a real education for me - the rookie.....lol  Will you confirm my thoughts that 14L would be very uncomfortable.  We do have some folks at pulmo rehab that use the tanks marked 6+ so there are a few using more than 6.  My career in the Air Force was spent in the Minuteman missile career field and while that is a solid fuel missile, we did get a lot of training on liquid fuel missiles also.  Liquid oxygen (LOX) was always that stuff in the frosty tanks to me.........lol so it is hard to imagine putting it up your nose.

The new regulator I got a couple of days ago is either continuous or demand and comes with a different cannula that fits in the nose tighter and has somewhat stiffer tubing on the cannula itself.  I realize I am probably preaching to the choir here but take pity on me as being the uninformed guy.  Thanks again for the continuing flow of information.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

cadee2c

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #42 on: December 01, 2017, 09:11:54 PM »
Altitude does make a ton of difference. While going through the heights in the northwest last summer, i had to run the generator for the DH to use his concetrator. As soon as we were back down, he was fine.

Recently he bought a battery pack/car jump starter thingy that he just plugs the concentrator into. It will run the oxygen all night. Something like this one... I told him he shoulda gotten the one with the air compressor then he would have back up. lol

https://www.target.com/p/peak-600-amp-jump-starter/-/A-15130590?ref=tgt_adv_XS000000&AFID=google_pla_df&CPNG=PLA_Home+Improvement+Shopping&adgroup=SC_Home+Improvement&LID=700000001170770pgs&network=g&device=c&location=9027958&gclid=Cj0KCQiAmITRBRCSARIsAEOZmr4aknCacSXbtNDj66pjbSRUkwjcQgLvwhfI936Tn7bhbf-GPiyExAUaAk4cEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
Caryl- Pilot
Bob- Navigator
Mister Hank - homeland security
Buddy the Dog-  Soul Mutt, forever in our hearts.


1997 Holiday Rambler Endeavor
2010 Jeep Liberty

Follow your arrow, wherever it points

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #43 on: December 02, 2017, 07:51:24 AM »
Altitude does make a ton of difference. While going through the heights in the northwest last summer, i had to run the generator for the DH to use his concetrator. As soon as we were back down, he was fine.

Recently he bought a battery pack/car jump starter thingy that he just plugs the concentrator into. It will run the oxygen all night. Something like this one... I told him he shoulda gotten the one with the air compressor then he would have back up. lol

https://www.target.com/p/peak-600-amp-jump-starter/-/A-15130590?r

More good info.  I have one of those and it has the air compressor. Came from Harbor Freight but looks very similar and at a bit lower price with a 20 percent off coupon.  Works great - started car when battery went bad and aired up one tire on coach that had a slow leak.

Bill

Edit: Fixed link and formatting -LS
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 11:38:19 AM by Lou Schneider »
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2018, 08:46:13 AM »
Sort of an update to this thread. 
     I bought a portable oxygen concentrator on line on Monday and it arrived at my home yesterday.  It is an Invacare Platinum.  It normally lists for $2495 with a single battery.  I got mine for $2198 with two batteries.  It appears to be a nice unit and one thing that led to the sale was the very good price (considering) and the fact that the dealer was advertising it with a 5 year guarantee in addition to the sale price. 
     I took the unit out of the box and charged up the batteries as required and turned it on last night.  Kind of noisy but then I have to remember that it is a concentrator and not just a tank you are hauling around. Lots of nice features including inserting and removing the batteries from the top and not the bottom. Therefore you never have to turn the unit off to change batteries but it also holds both batteries giving you a much longer running time depending on liter requirement.  It goes from 1 to 4 liters.
     Now for the rest of the story.  After the batteries were charged I turned the unit on on looked at the LCD display but it looked strange.  About 1/4 inch of the display in the center was missing.  Any words on the display would be missing several of the middle letters.  So I turned it off, read the book a bit more and found no reason for this.  Turned it back on and this time there was  only a blank on the LCD display.  It has not worked since then but all the other features do work including it putting out oxygen.  4 liters sounds sort of like a jet engine......lol 
     So I email the salesman and told him the problem.  I also told him I saw no mention of a 5 year warranty on any of the paperwork - just the standard 3 year warranty.  And the biggie.  He originally told me that I had 5 days to return the unit for money back or 30 days to return it for exchange on another brand concentrator (he also sells Inogen and others).  But when I looked at the company web site they were bragging that everybody gets a 30 day money back trial period.  So when I told him it was broke I also told him that if he could not honor the 30 day money back deal as advertised and if he could not provide me with proof of a 5 year warranty, then he could just refund my money.  I am waiting for his reply.
     This is my first experience in dealing with purchase of medical equipment.  My home oxygen concentrator and tank filler are handled by my local Mercy  hospital company and paid by Medicare.  I can only comment that medical equipment pricing  is crazy.  A replacement battery is $400.  A standard battery charger is $299 - just crazy.  Will try and remember to post the final outcome of this adventure but I know that I will eventually need a portable concentrator when we start travelling again.  The salesman did say in an email last night that they would send out a replacement but that was before I put forth the conditions I mentioned above.

Bill
« Last Edit: January 18, 2018, 08:48:20 AM by Bill N »
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

John From Detroit

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #45 on: January 18, 2018, 09:43:32 AM »
YES, Medical supplies, medication and hardware both, are way way way way overpriced here in the USA..

I see a lot of folks blaming the Affordable Care act but that's not the cause.
The cause of thei high prices is twofold
ONE: used to be Doctors, and medical providers (Such asd Imogen and Eli-Lilly) were not allowed to advertise, at least not for Humans.

And Corporate GREED.  Selling a 10 dollar charger for 300 is a prime example of that.  Or upping the price of a medication from 500 to 5000 percent overnight.
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
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Bill N

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2018, 03:47:13 PM »
Another update:  Turns out I woke them up at the company about their 30 day money back guarantee.  They must have spent half of the day revising that policy on line because they were not aware it was still listed in the FAQs.  So I have now been guaranteed 30 day money back return if I choose to use that option - the last customer that will be allowed to do that.  I can see their point.  The owner called me and told me of some horror stories they had on the 30 day returns.  Guess it is hard to believe what people can do to a machine in only 30 days but the examples he gave me made me see why they changed it.  But I also notice they put a 6% restocking fee on any  returns in 30 days unless the item arrived unserviceable at the buyers home (like me).  That 6% could add up to some real change on the dollar figures for some of these machines  They also sent me a 5 year warranty via email and are having a new machine sent even before I return mine to make sure that all the accessories are in good shape too.  I guess things like batteries could arrive damaged. Anyway, looks like we have reached a settlement that satisfies me and them.  At least the two salesmen are also company owners so you don't get that old "if the boss approves" BS.  Happy again - at least for the moment.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

catblaster

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Re: Oxygen Concentrator Use On The Road
« Reply #47 on: January 18, 2018, 08:24:49 PM »
    Glad that worked out for you Bill,let us know how that machine works out for you!
Will and Jane
95 Winnebago Luxor

 

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