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Author Topic: Dealing with wifi on the road?  (Read 2161 times)

wijames2002

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Dealing with wifi on the road?
« on: November 22, 2017, 07:19:44 AM »
I was wondering how you guys deal with the need for WIFI when on the road? Do most parks have WIFI available or is it better to get a contract service? I've seen that AT&T has a RV service for $20 a month after you buy the box, has anyone tried it?
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SeilerBird

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2017, 07:29:24 AM »
I use Google's Project Fi as the wireless provider for my cell phone. It comes with free tethering so Wifi isn't an issue for me.
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donn

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 07:33:25 AM »
Typical RV park wifi is less than dialup if you can actually get on.  There really not reliable.  So, your choices are cell based or sat service.  Satelite service is good if your not near a cell tower.  But the equipment is expensive and speed is horribly slow.  Cell based service is generslly speaking your best option.  Not sure what box your talking about, maybe a wifi  only connection?  Dont need one.  A modern smart phone will have wifi capabilities. As for service?  Most RVers use Verizon for its wide ranging coverage.  Cell based wifi is not cheap, unless you go with one of the off brand providers that only have service i  a select few major cities.
Doing a bit of web surfing, payong bills, and some emails csn take 6gig of data easily.  So if your looking at anything less, be aware because overage charges can get expensive.

shorts

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 08:00:27 AM »
I was wondering how you guys deal with the need for WIFI when on the road? Do most parks have WIFI available or is it better to get a contract service? I've seen that AT&T has a RV service for $20 a month after you buy the box, has anyone tried it?

I think you are referring to the AT&T Mobley unlimited data car connect $20 month plan. I don’t think you can get that anymore. It is no longer offered on the website (the plan) although someone reported recently that he signed up online for the 1G plan then called the car connect department and got put on some “list” with a promise that he would be switched to the unlimited $20 plan at some point in the future. Have not heard if that has happened or not.

We did get in on the unlimited mobley plan when it was available and it works well when we have AT&T coverage. Our main internet usage though is with a grandfathered unlimited data plan with Verizon we purchased used in a jet pack. No throttling or limits.

We subscribed to rvmobileinternet.com and did a lot of research before we went fulltime. They describe all the plans out there and the best ways to go about getting them.

Vicki
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Gizmo

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2017, 08:14:29 AM »
In my experience WiFi at RV parks varies from very poor to decent, depending on the parks investment in Wifi equipment and the location of your space relative to the office or where ever the equipment is housed.  If Wifi is important to you, you might consider investing in Wifi boosting equipment such as Wilson Weboost.  Such equipment will take whatever Wifi signal is available and boost the signal.  Depending on the location of the RV Park relative to other businesses, you may be able to receive Wifi from other sources that may be near by.
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wijames2002

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2017, 11:08:50 AM »
I think you are referring to the AT&T Mobley unlimited data car connect $20 month plan. I don’t think you can get that anymore. It is no longer offered on the website (the plan) although someone reported recently that he signed up online for the 1G plan then called the car connect department and got put on some “list” with a promise that he would be switched to the unlimited $20 plan at some point in the future. Have not heard if that has happened or not.

We did get in on the unlimited mobley plan when it was available and it works well when we have AT&T coverage. Our main internet usage though is with a grandfathered unlimited data plan with Verizon we purchased used in a jet pack. No throttling or limits.

We subscribed to rvmobileinternet.com and did a lot of research before we went fulltime. They describe all the plans out there and the best ways to go about getting them.

Vicki

Thanks, It's my understanding from the local AT&T store that Mobly will come back online just after the first of the year.  If it does, I'm thinking that this may be the way to go.
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ArdraF

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2017, 06:29:40 PM »
It would help us answer you better if you were a tad more specific such as where you plan to go (urban or remote) and how you plan to use it (business or email or movie streaming).  Don't depend on park wifi.  Some were set up properly and work fairly well if you're close to their equipment.  Others aren't very good and two or three people streaming movies make it unusable for everyone else.  Years ago we had both AT&T and Verizon and now have only Verizon because it has decent coverage nationwide.  There will be places where there is no cell coverage from any carrier because there aren't any towers in the area.  Monument Valley, the middle of Nevada and Yellowstone are examples.  So if you plan on going to remote areas - which are RVer favorites - you have to realize you may be without coverage at times.

ArdraF
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SMR

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2017, 05:58:11 AM »
we use an AT&T phone and a straight talk (on Verizon) net work as hot spots for our hot spots. we need a secure connection for our work. sometimes they both work great and other times only one which is why we went with the 2 different carriers.
we both had AT&T until they didn't work in remote Iowa so we got the straight talk.
we have the 55.00 plan on the straight talk and it has recently gone from 15 gb's to unlimited
I have found the wifi in most parks to be slow - great for emails but not always great for looking at maps or heavy searching
JMHO
Gonna put the world away for a minute......
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shorts

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2017, 08:03:18 AM »
Thanks, It's my understanding from the local AT&T store that Mobly will come back online just after the first of the year.  If it does, I'm thinking that this may be the way to go.

It was my understanding that the Mobley device is still available but the $20 unlimited data plan is not. Was the AT&T store referring to the device or the plan? The Mobley device often went in and out of stock so they may just be referring to it. If you can’t get the unlimited data plan with it, there are much better devices to get to use with the other data plans AT&T have such as the Unite Explore.

Vicki
Vicki and Mark Shorter
2015 Forrest River Blue Ridge RS3600 5er
2015 Dodge Ram 3500 dually 4wd
On the road fulltime!

mikeylikesit

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2017, 09:56:47 AM »
I must need sleep........


thought this was about  "Dealing with wife on the road?"   :o


 ::)

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wijames2002

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2017, 10:57:33 AM »
It would help us answer you better if you were a tad more specific such as where you plan to go (urban or remote) and how you plan to use it (business or email or movie streaming).  Don't depend on park wifi.  Some were set up properly and work fairly well if you're close to their equipment.  Others aren't very good and two or three people streaming movies make it unusable for everyone else.  Years ago we had both AT&T and Verizon and now have only Verizon because it has decent coverage nationwide.  There will be places where there is no cell coverage from any carrier because there aren't any towers in the area.  Monument Valley, the middle of Nevada and Yellowstone are examples.  So if you plan on going to remote areas - which are RVer favorites - you have to realize you may be without coverage at times.

ArdraF

We are seniors so we will be staying urban and in campgrounds with full hookups and we will be using it mostly for email and banking while out. Hope this helps.
1998 Fleetwood Southwind Storm
Chevy 454
2018 Kia Soul in tow.
"Liam lV" hearing service dog as co-pilot

"People will forget the things you say or do but they will always remember the way you make them feel"

Rene T

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2017, 11:19:44 AM »
We had Wi-Fi in the CG we've been staying at during the winter for the last 5 years and the Wi-Fi stunk. This past spring, we switched from Sprint (which we hated) to Verizon. We've excellent coverage with Verizon. We purchased a Mi-Fi Jet Pack Model 7730L  from Verizon for our Wi-Fi. As long as we have bars, we have Wi-Fi. We also have the unlimited plan. We keep it behind the built in TV and leave it plugged in all the time. The only problem we've seen is that once we get to 15 gb's, the Wi-Fi does slow down a bit. Not a big deal for us.  This Jet Pack cost $50.00 to purchased and another $20.00 a month for the service. At the end of the month, we start over with gb's and things will speed up.   
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Old Blevins

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2017, 11:54:38 AM »
We are seniors so we will be staying urban and in campgrounds with full hookups and we will be using it mostly for email and banking while out. Hope this helps.
You’ll want to be careful about using campground, or any public, wifi for banking on the road.  I recommend you do some research on the security risks and VPNs (Virtual Private Networks). A direct data plan for your phone or other device - which can then be linked to your own private, secure wifi is a safer option.
Jim
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ArdraF

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2017, 05:30:02 PM »
Quote
You’ll want to be careful about using campground, or any public, wifi for banking on the road.

Definitely!  They're not secure and anyone knowledgeable can "see" what you do.  Banking and tasks using a credit card should be done on your own system for a more secure connection.  We have a Verizon Pantech modem that we connect to a Cradlepoint WiPipe router.  Within the motorhome the modem transmits the signal and we both use it with our laptops.  In other words we have our own little local area network that we both access.

ArdraF
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Tom Hoffman

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2017, 10:54:21 PM »
http://www.millenicom.com/sign-up/

We have used this for a couple of years and it works well if you have a strong signal usually very fast.  It is not unlimited but it does carry over any unused data to the next month.  We get the 22Gig plan.    Turn on or off as the need dictates.

Easy to deal with customer service.
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SeilerBird

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2017, 05:32:03 AM »
Oh baloney. Banking over wifi is just as secure as banking over a wired connection. All banks use https connection for connecting to them. That is different than the usual http connection. The S stands for secure.

"Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the secure version of HTTP, the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to. The 'S' at the end of HTTPS stands for 'Secure'. It means all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted. HTTPS is often used to protect highly confidential online transactions like online banking and online shopping order forms.

Web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome also display a padlock icon in the address bar to visually indicate that a HTTPS connection is in effect."

I have been banking on a wifi connection for the last 15 years without issue.
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Ernie n Tara

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2017, 07:37:33 AM »
What he said^^^^

Ernie
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Gizmo

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2017, 08:25:52 AM »
I have to agree with SeilerBird and the same applies to making purchases on line, as long as the vendor has the HTTPS protocol.  Though most do these day's there are some that do not, so be careful there, but all banks and financial institutions do have HTTPS protocol and aggressively update their security.  The security issue with WiFi and where you need to be careful is with e-mail.
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6x16inside

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2017, 12:59:44 PM »
I use Google's Project Fi as the wireless provider for my cell phone. It comes with free tethering so Wifi isn't an issue for me.

Cost if I may be so nosy?

6x16inside

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2017, 01:10:24 PM »
Oh baloney. Banking over wifi is just as secure as banking over a wired connection. All banks use https connection for connecting to them. That is different than the usual http connection. The S stands for secure.

"Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the secure version of HTTP, the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to. The 'S' at the end of HTTPS stands for 'Secure'. It means all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted. HTTPS is often used to protect highly confidential online transactions like online banking and online shopping order forms.

Web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome also display a padlock icon in the address bar to visually indicate that a HTTPS connection is in effect."

I have been banking on a wifi connection for the last 15 years without issue.


I whole heartedly agree!!  You can secure this and lock down that and someone else will "accidentally" leak a million peoples' credit info, etc.
Nothing is 100% fail proof safe nowhere, nohow anymore and you can worry yourself senseless and steal your own joy in life constantly watching out for the "boogeyman".

ArdraF

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2017, 01:20:06 PM »
Just to clarify, it isn't the banks and other businesses that are the problem, although a lot of them like Experian have had big hacking issues even with https: and spending millions to secure their networks.  It is the campground wifi that does not have the security you need for financial transactions.  If huge financial institutions cannot secure their data, we certainly can't expect a small operation like a campground to do so.  In other words, I will repeat that you should not be doing financial transactions over unsecured campground wifi networks.  If you haven't been compromised you're lucky, but I wouldn't count on it continuing.  We just received a new credit card because our bank notified us that they had been compromised.  This is not the first time, either.

ArdraF
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Lou Schneider

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2017, 02:59:15 PM »
Just to clarify, it isn't the banks and other businesses that are the problem, although a lot of them like Experian have had big hacking issues even with https: and spending millions to secure their networks.  It is the campground wifi that does not have the security you need for financial transactions.  If huge financial institutions cannot secure their data, we certainly can't expect a small operation like a campground to do so.

The hacks that exposed user data had nothing to do with the user connections, the user data was hacked from a point within the bank's internal network after the secure user connections were decoded back into normal data.

The security, or lack of same in the link between your PC and the bank is irrelevant.

HTTPS provides encoded, secure transmission end to end, from the browser in your computer to the ultimate destination.  In fact you have to assume ANY connection to the Internet is not secure, with hundreds if not thousands of places where your data can be intercepted.

That's why secure encrypted connections were developed very early in the game.  As long as it's HTTPS the data is secure because at any point along the way, it's nothing but indecipherable gibberish.  It doesn't matter if the campground WiFi posts your data on a 40 ft. high billboard for all to see, it's encrypted and safe.

Likewise, no one can break in and send data to your computer, anything inserted along the path between the sender and your PC's browser during a HTTPS connection is rejected as invalid.

I have no problem using WiFi for HTTPS financial transactions, either via a campground's WiFi or at home.  In fact, my Mobley uses WiFi to link to my computer, then a radio connection to get to the cell tower.  Both are vulnerable to interception and monitoring.  As long as the connection is HTTPS, my data is secure.

Non-secure HTTP connections are another story.  Most email systems use HTTP, not HTTPS connections, and this is where the problems arise.  You're right to be concerned if you're using them for sensitive information.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 04:06:43 PM by Lou Schneider »

Stephen S.

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2017, 03:43:16 PM »
To add to what Lou is saying... if your ISP has a web site you can use to access your email, and that site is HTTPS (secured) the only way anyone could get your info as you read your email at a coffee shop or McD's is to look over your shoulder. My Xfinity accounts use HTTPS for reading/sending email online.

And even with an email program, not web based, email is secure if your ISP requires you to log in to a secure account that uses encryption. Most email clients, especially newer ones have encryption abilities.

Most likely ways to get your info stolen are using a physical card and having it scanned by an illegal device, or have the info stolen along with others from a business data storage.

The big ones you hear about go unreported for months, or even years. You might think it was that little thing you bought on line last week that did it, but it was more likely the data breach at a major retailer 4 years ago they are finally now having to admit to as the bad guys start using the info.
Stephen S.
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QZ

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2017, 03:50:32 PM »
When we hit the road a couple months ago I just kept responding YES to the Verizon texts that I was about to run out of data. 2 Android phones which are paid for, this month bill $211.00

NY_Dutch

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2017, 07:51:58 PM »
When we hit the road a couple months ago I just kept responding YES to the Verizon texts that I was about to run out of data. 2 Android phones which are paid for, this month bill $211.00

If AT&T brings back the Connected Car unlimited 4G/LTE data plan that was offered for the Mobley hotspot, grab it. We used 74 GB last month, and I just got the new bill: $22.01 including taxes and fees...
Dutch
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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2017, 07:59:09 PM »
If AT&T brings back the Connected Car unlimited 4G/LTE data plan that was offered for the Mobley hotspot, grab it. We used 74 GB last month, and I just got the new bill: $22.01 including taxes and fees...

Thank you
It's one of those things that I haven't addressed yet. We started out using a little data and it grew then we  saw offers like the Sprint unlimited etc and then hear that it's not what they say so I lock up and just keep doing the same thing. If I push for major changes and anything goes wrong or is a pita guess who messed up.....so I put it in the marriage math category, $100 for me and $100 for her and no problems for me. Done carry on. :)

Wonderlust

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2017, 12:19:55 PM »
Over a year I got tired of using quite often poor wifi at campgrounds (like having to sit at a picnic table outside the office in cold weather in order to get reception). Also, you can't stream anything on campground wifi and I like to use Netflix. So I broke down and got an unlimited myfi - Verizon - with cell phone service, I pay around $150 a month. Worth it.

ferfer

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2017, 12:49:15 PM »
If I am reading this correctly,  FMCA and Verizon just teamed offering a hotspot for $50/mo and 2 year comment :

https://www.fmca.com/benefits/verizon.html

I have Mobley but if (when) it goes away?
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Rene T

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Re: Dealing with wifi on the road?
« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2017, 12:59:47 PM »
Over a year I got tired of using quite often poor wifi at campgrounds (like having to sit at a picnic table outside the office in cold weather in order to get reception). Also, you can't stream anything on campground wifi and I like to use Netflix. So I broke down and got an unlimited myfi - Verizon - with cell phone service, I pay around $150 a month. Worth it.

With my Verizon MiFI unlimited, when you use 15 GB it starts to slow down a bit until the next billing cycle. I can live with it.
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL