EPDM Coatings
rvupgradestore.com Composet Products Custom Yacht Interiors

Author Topic: Cataract surgery  (Read 2244 times)

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Cataract surgery
« on: November 26, 2017, 12:47:45 PM »
I posted on another thread that I was having cataract surgery and it drew a few comments, so I thought I would share my experience.

I had the left eye done almost 3 weeks ago and the right eye done last Tuesday. I had the option of having the lens for distance or close-up vision. I chose distance.  The results have been fantastic. I have worn glasses for 60 years. Now, I see distance better than I ever did, even with glasses.  Whites and colors are at least 30% brighter. I bought a $5 pair of reading glasses  (2 power) and can read and use the computer easily. I am going to call mine "eating glasses" not reading glasses because I use them to see my food also.  The great thing is the distance vision.  I find myself just looking around and thinking, "I never noticed that before." The lens replacements is so much better than glasses. Glasses can get dirty, scratched and have reflections. If any of you have done photo editing, it is much like the "sharpen" function. The edges of everything are  more defined and details are clearer.

I asked the receptionist how many surgeries that the doctor does, since Rene said that should be a factor. He operates only on Tuesday and has follow-ups on Wednesday. He had 9 scheduled for last Tuesday and she said he usually does from 12 to 15. I did   get a scratch on the cornea of my right eye that caused it to heal 2 days slower than the left, but now it is as good as the other.

Last night was the first time I did any night driving since the operation. I had tried to avoid night driving for the last year or more.  Before the oncoming headlights were a large glob of light and with rays extending out. Now,  they actually look like headlights.

The surgery itself was relatively painless, just some pain from the injections (2) around the eye. The "fear" factor was the worse thing for me. It was very uncomfortable for me to be tied to a table and my head strapped down. That, and not being able to see, caused anxiety. Healing time was 2 days for the left and 4 for the right. There is a feeling of sand in the eye or an arc burn from welding. Drops are prescribed.

Is it life changing? Probably not, but  it is surely life  improving to a large degree and I would dertainly do it again. 
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2017, 01:05:52 PM »
Congratulation Half.  How old are you if I may ask?
I went to the Lasik Vision Center here in Tampa just 4 days ago to see if they could do my eyes. They advertise $299.00 per eye. Because I was 70 years old, they would not recommend it because the chances are I'm going to develop cataract in the next few years just like you. I could have had the surgery and had the lenses implanted right now at a cost of $9000.00. Medicare would not pay any of that. I opted to wait till I get cataracts. That could happen anytime or never.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 01:07:28 PM by Rene T »
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

SeilerBird

  • ---
  • Posts: 11664
  • Everything I state is my opinion.
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2017, 01:06:31 PM »
Glad to hear everything is alright. Very encouraging. ;D
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Favorite 2017 shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y0HbMU5KYa2hx02E3
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7
My Grand Canyon shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1

VallAndMo

  • ---
  • Posts: 542
  • Vall and Mo, a married couple getting ready for FT
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2017, 01:26:58 PM »
Hi Half,

Thanks for the report, glad to hear everything has gone alright with your surgery.

If you don't mind, I have two questions:

1) Did you have any astigmatism before the surgery? Did it get corrected too?

2) have you considered correcting one eye for close vision and the other for distant vision? Some folks I know did that with Lasik and report that the result gave them almost perfect vision for both close and distant ranges.

Cheers,
--
   Vall.

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2017, 01:57:59 PM »
  How old are you if I may ask?

I am 72 and diabetic--type 2 for 10  years. I was told diabetes can cause cataracts to grow faster.


1) Did you have any astigmatism before the surgery? Did it get corrected too?

No astigmatism, but my wife does and she was told it could be corrected, if the lens was the cause.

have you considered correcting one eye for close vision and the other for distant vision?

No, I really wanted clear distance vision, since I have never had it. I was not told of the other option, but would not have taken it.
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2017, 02:24:08 PM »


2) have you considered correcting one eye for close vision and the other for distant vision? Some folks I know did that with Lasik and report that the result gave them almost perfect vision for both close and distant ranges.

That's interesting. I'd be curious if any of our members did that and how is it working out for them. Does it have any affect when driving?
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

Larry N.

  • ---
  • Posts: 4837
  • Westminster, CO
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2017, 02:33:18 PM »
DW had cataract surgery a month ago, the two eyes a week apart. The afternoon of the first operation (it was done early morning) she encountered very strong pain, called the doc, and we went to the office, where the doc applied an eye drop that immediately reduced, then eliminated the pain. Seems there was pressure buildup internally, and the eye drop took care of that. Of course a prescription to get those drops let her take them for several days.

After that, other than a slight feeling of something in her eye (eye drops helped this, too), there was no pain. She commented more than once how much brighter things were in the affected eye than in the other one (she'd had to stop night driving, too). The second eye went as well as the first, except that she didn't get the pain from the high pressure, so there was only that feeling of something in the eye.

Prior to the first surgery she was given a chart for each eye showing when to apply what eye drops (prescription, of course), and starting a couple of days before the first surgery she had to start certain drops. She just put her last drop in the last eye yesterday, and is enjoying the difference, except that she no longer can read small print without glasses (it was surprising she could before at 75), but she's adjusting, can can now drive at night again. I've even heard her complain a time or two about lights being too bright (but adjustment comes quickly).
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

Charlie 5320

  • ---
  • Posts: 2063
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2017, 03:41:56 PM »
My late wife has had terrible eyes most all her life. I tried to get her to have corrective surgery many years ago but she was afraid something would go wrong and she would be blind. When she started taking chemo it really affected her eyes, she could hardly see and we were getting her new glasses every few months. She got so there wasn't much they could do so her Dr. sent her to another Dr. He talked her into having surgery. Her first eye was done right before thanksgiving in 16 and she wound up in the hospital that night with a bowel blockage. But she could see for the first time as far as she could remember. The Dr. even came to the hospital for her fallow up visit. They did her second eye right before Christmas 16, she could finally see again, but had to wear readers when reading a book but could use the computer with out the readers. She was so happy she could actually see better than she had most of her life.
2003 National Dolphin 5320
496  8.1  Workhorse

98 Damon Daybreak 3130
GM Vortech 454  4L80E
SOLD

Dan de La Mesa

  • ---
  • Posts: 101
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2017, 03:47:50 PM »
For 25 years I wore contacts that allowed distance vision in the right eye and reading vision in the left. The only problem was in getting the brain accustomed to switching back and forth as needed. Worked fine, but I probably wouldn't do it again. There's nothing quite like having perfectly focused stereo vision for judging distance.

ChasA

  • ---
  • Posts: 362
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2017, 03:58:34 PM »
My wife had cataract surgery about two months ago and then some laser procedure called Yag to remove some cloudiness left after the surgery. She now just uses glasses for reading. She's having a time getting used to not wearing glasses after wearing them for 40 years. I'm getting mine done when we go home in the spring.
Apex, NC
2010 Winnebago journey Express 34Y (pre DEF)
2007 Saturn Vue

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2017, 04:02:21 PM »
My wife had cataract surgery about two months ago and then some laser procedure called Yag to remove some cloudiness left after the surgery. She now just uses glasses for reading. She's having a time getting used to not wearing glasses after wearing them for 40 years. I'm getting mine done when we go home in the spring.



Is she on Medicare and if she is, did they pay for the surgery?

Are you going to check on getting one eye for distance and the other for reading?

I've was in Apex last year. Had to go to the Progressive Industries factory to exchange my surge protector.
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

SeilerBird

  • ---
  • Posts: 11664
  • Everything I state is my opinion.
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2017, 04:25:33 PM »
Well the one eye for distance and one eye for close up would not work for me at all. My $2000 3D TV would be worthless. ???
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Favorite 2017 shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y0HbMU5KYa2hx02E3
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7
My Grand Canyon shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1

jackiemac

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 2157
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2017, 04:35:24 PM »
Hi Half,

Thanks for the report, glad to hear everything has gone alright with your surgery.

If you don't mind, I have two questions:

2) have you considered correcting one eye for close vision and the other for distant vision? Some folks I know did that with Lasik and report that the result gave them almost perfect vision for both close and distant ranges.

Cheers,
--
   Vall.
I have contact lenses like that. I find a bit of difference at night or wearing sunglasses where my vision is not as clear. Otherwise its quite good but not quite as clear as it used to be when my prescription was a bit better.  I couldn't be bothered having to keep reading glasses around, That would annoy me. 😁

Glad Jim had a positive result!
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

2017 Heartland Sundance 288rls
2016 Dodge Ram 2500 6.4L Hemi

Home in Scotland eagerly awaiting next trip!

ChasA

  • ---
  • Posts: 362
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2017, 05:14:34 PM »
Rene T,
Yes medicare and our BCBSNC supplemental (no copay) paid it all. She did have to get some very expensive drops that our drug plan doesn't cover. The doctor gave her some coupons that helped a lot. With the coupons and some free samples from the doc, it cost $60. Would have been several hundred without the coupons.
Apex, NC
2010 Winnebago journey Express 34Y (pre DEF)
2007 Saturn Vue

MN Blue Skies

  • ---
  • Posts: 1175
  • Favorite saying: "It depends."
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #14 on: November 26, 2017, 05:55:00 PM »
Glad to hear everything is alright. Very encouraging. ;D

Rene, it sounds like you were considering Lasik.  If so I'm glad you decided against it.  I had Lasik done about two years ago by a very famous Doctor in MN.  I ended up with warped corneas.  It turns out that at my age and with my need for good eye sight for editing photography, fly fishing, hunting, bird watching, reading, sewing, and driving, I was not a good candidate for Lasik but the famous Doctor didn't tell me this. 

I had one eye done for distance and one for near vision.  It was a disaster.  After the fact the famous doctor explained that not everyone can adapt to "mono vision".  Then he suggested that I probably should have tried contacts prior to the Lasik surgery to check out my tolerance for mono vision.  BTW my Lasik surgery was very painful.

On the other hand, Eric had cataracts and had cataract surgery done.  He is happy with his results.  I should have waited for cataracts to develop.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 06:03:34 PM by MN Blue Skies »
A girl called Max, her husband Eric, Princess Kitty, and Molly the Service Dog in training.

2013 Cougar High Country 315 RES ( A 35' 5th Wheel)
"Big Blue" 2012 RAM 3500 Big Horn (Cummins Diesel 1 ton)

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #15 on: November 26, 2017, 07:32:22 PM »
Rene, it sounds like you were considering Lasik.  If so I'm glad you decided against it.  I had Lasik done about two years ago by a very famous Doctor in MN.  I ended up with warped corneas.  It turns out that at my age and with my need for good eye sight for editing photography, fly fishing, hunting, bird watching, reading, sewing, and driving, I was not a good candidate for Lasik but the famous Doctor didn't tell me this. 

I had one eye done for distance and one for near vision.  It was a disaster.  After the fact the famous doctor explained that not everyone can adapt to "mono vision".  Then he suggested that I probably should have tried contacts prior to the Lasik surgery to check out my tolerance for mono vision.  BTW my Lasik surgery was very painful.

On the other hand, Eric had cataracts and had cataract surgery done.  He is happy with his results.  I should have waited for cataracts to develop.

Hi Max,
I was kinda bumbed when the doctor said I was not a candidate at this time. We're going on a 10 day cruise the end of January and was looking forward and was all siked (spelling?) up to not need glasses before the cruise.
Yes I decided against it for 2 reasons. One was that I may get cataracts anytime in the future and having it done now, it would have been a waste of money and two, it would have cost $9000.00.  :'( (:(
I'll wait till I need it done. 
I need to hear from more people who had the "mono vision" surgery.  Right now, I would do the distance and live with having to wear glasses for reading. I don't read much anyway. 
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 07:33:53 PM by Rene T »
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

SeilerBird

  • ---
  • Posts: 11664
  • Everything I state is my opinion.
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #16 on: November 26, 2017, 07:41:36 PM »
siked = psyched
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Favorite 2017 shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y0HbMU5KYa2hx02E3
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7
My Grand Canyon shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2017, 09:37:29 PM »
My two cents and some various meandering thoughts:

I had cataract surgeries on both eyes in 2000. My doctor talked me into mono vision,where one eye is set for distance and one set for reading. He made my left eye 20/50 for reading and my right eye 20/15 for distance. When the visions are that close together, the brain will compensate and essentially blend the visions of the two eyes together so you can't tell which eye you are really focusing with, depending on how far away the object is that you are looking at. I also had the YAG laser after cloudiness developed on the back of the lens capsule.

Since then, I had both retinas detach - not from the surgeries - just bad timing. I had LASIK done on both eyes afterward to correct their visions since the insertion of the scleral buckles used to correct the detachments squeeze the eyeball and causes near sightedness all over again.

In February of this year, I discovered that I needed emergency eye surgery because the zonules that hold the lens capsule in place had dissolved and the lens in one eye was ready to fall into the retina. This can be caused by taking Alpha blockers that dissolve celluloid, which is what the zonules are made of. There are supposedly only 10-12 surgeons in the world that can perform the surgery to suture the lens capsule to the inside of the sclera, or white of the eye. Getting it at just the right focal point is nearly impossible, so my distance eye is now 20/30. In September, the reading eye also had to have the same surgery, and it is now seeing about 20/60. I can get by with the vision as it is, but if I want good distance vision, I have to wear a weak contact lens or as an alternative, get glasses. Since I wore glasses my entire life until the cataract surgeries, I really don't want to go back to them.

Mono vision may sound like a very strange concept, but it is quite convenient and you can get used to it quite easily. There are some people who simply cannot adapt to it, however.

Most doctors don't want to provide LASIK procedures to anyone over the age of 50 because it has been proven that the correction the operation provides may not last very long. I don't know why, but it has something to do with changes in the cornea as you age.

MN Blue Skies sounds like he or she had an incompetent eye surgeon. LASIK should not hurt other than a bit of stinging for about a day that a couple of aspirin or Tylenol can alleviate. Someone else brought up the point of making sure your doctor has performed the surgery of any kind - cataract or LASIK - numerous times. Going to a doctor that performs eight or nine surgeries in one day means nothing. You want to find a doctor who has performed this surgery a minimum of 10,000 times. A good doctor would have not waited to suggest contacts until after the surgery to determine if you could tolerate mono vision, but instead, prescribe you contacts prior to the surgery and ask you to wear them for a month. Please do not assume that LASIK is not good for anyone just because you had a bad experience. I'm very sorry that this happened to you, but I think it was due to the individual doctor, not the overall procedure.

Tom - I can watch a 3D television and still get the full effect because even though the eyes are set at different focal points, they still have binocular ability, meaning they can work together to detect distance. If you couldn't watch 3D with them, you also couldn't drive with them.

At present, I have had 14 eye surgeries to retain my vision and I feel very fortunate that I can see as well as I do. I'm not happy with the fact that after all those surgeries, I now have to wear contacts or glasses if I want perfect distance vision, but my doctor tells me that even though I'm 65 and have already had three LASIK procedures done, he'll consider doing another to get my vision to what it was before he repositioned the lenses. I can't ask for more than that.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Dragginourbedaround

  • ---
  • Posts: 894
  • I look out the window and see trees, I'm camping
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #18 on: November 26, 2017, 10:54:25 PM »

1) Did you have any astigmatism before the surgery? Did it get corrected too?

2) have you considered correcting one eye for close vision and the other for distant vision? Some folks I know did that with Lasik and report that the result gave them almost perfect vision for both close and distant ranges.
I have astigmatism and have been using mono vision contacts for about 20 years. For most of those 20 years I've only been wearing one lens. The reading lens and not the distance lens. Over the years I have occasionally tried using the distance lens, but don't see any real benefit, so I go back to using just one lens. For me there wasn't an adjustment period. When I'm reading my reading lens (left eye) takes over and as soon as I look up my right eye takes over. I wear it most of the day, but take it out in the evening if I'm going to be doing a lot of reading or watching TV. The TV is far enough away that I don't need the reading lens and if I'm just reading a book for awhile reading glasses are clearer. But for 80% of the day one contact makes life easier not having to wear bifocals or put on and take off reading glasses all day.
Gene

2013 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2011 Honda Fit

henkelphoto

  • ---
  • Posts: 129
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #19 on: November 26, 2017, 11:01:15 PM »
Just a thought for the OP and anyone else coming from wearing glasses for a long time. I had my cataract surgeries after wearing glasses for over 50 years. One thing to remember, is when you are doing anything that can possibly cause something to fly up into your eyes to wear safety glasses.

I was mowing the lawn one day when it was overcast and wasn't wearing my sunglasses. In the past, I would have been wearing my regular glasses. This time, however, I wasn't due to having perfect distance vision. Guess what, a piece of wood came flying up and hit me in the eye. Not enough to do any damage, but enough to get my attention! So now, whenever I am doing anything with tools, mowing the lawn, riding my bike, etc, I'm wearing either sunglasses or safety glasses.
Dodge Ram 1500
Keystone Hideout 177lhs

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2017, 07:45:16 AM »
siked = psyched

That looks better. Thanks Tom.
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

SeilerBird

  • ---
  • Posts: 11664
  • Everything I state is my opinion.
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2017, 07:53:51 AM »
That looks better. Thanks Tom.
It looks better but it is sure not logical. You're welcome.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
Favorite 2017 shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/y0HbMU5KYa2hx02E3
My portfolio:
https://goo.gl/photos/Cx4SaYhGfYFShSty7
My Grand Canyon shots:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/Nc1AT8tQp25wJwfm1

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2017, 08:03:59 AM »
I posted on another thread that I was having cataract surgery and it drew a few comments, so I thought I would share my experience.

I had the left eye done almost 3 weeks ago and the right eye done last Tuesday. I had the option of having the lens for distance or close-up vision. I chose distance.  The results have been fantastic. I have worn glasses for 60 years. Now, I see distance better than I ever did, even with glasses.  Whites and colors are at least 30% brighter. I bought a $5 pair of reading glasses  (2 power) and can read and use the computer easily. I am going to call mine "eating glasses" not reading glasses because I use them to see my food also.  The great thing is the distance vision.  I find myself just looking around and thinking, "I never noticed that before." The lens replacements is so much better than glasses. Glasses can get dirty, scratched and have reflections. If any of you have done photo editing, it is much like the "sharpen" function. The edges of everything are  more defined and details are clearer.

I asked the receptionist how many surgeries that the doctor does, since Rene said that should be a factor. He operates only on Tuesday and has follow-ups on Wednesday. He had 9 scheduled for last Tuesday and she said he usually does from 12 to 15. I did   get a scratch on the cornea of my right eye that caused it to heal 2 days slower than the left, but now it is as good as the other.

Last night was the first time I did any night driving since the operation. I had tried to avoid night driving for the last year or more.  Before the oncoming headlights were a large glob of light and with rays extending out. Now,  they actually look like headlights.

The surgery itself was relatively painless, just some pain from the injections (2) around the eye. The "fear" factor was the worse thing for me. It was very uncomfortable for me to be tied to a table and my head strapped down. That, and not being able to see, caused anxiety. Healing time was 2 days for the left and 4 for the right. There is a feeling of sand in the eye or an arc burn from welding. Drops are prescribed.

Is it life changing? Probably not, but  it is surely life  improving to a large degree and I would dertainly do it again.

Your experience pretty much reflects the same as mine Jim but I never had any pain at all and don't even recall the surgery being performed but that was 5 years ago.  Now two weeks ago I had laser surgery to remove a film that frequently follows cataract surgery.  I had no idea that I had developed the film before the Dr spotted in on my yearly exam.  Quite common supposedly.  My wife developed a film after two years.  The corrective 'surgery' is a 5 minute treatment with a laser in an office setting - no meds or anything.  Tomorrow I go back to the regular eye doc to see if my vision has changed enough to need a new presription but I don't think it has.  However, the results of the laser surgery were spectacular.  Everything seemed so much brighter all around me. Even my computer screen looked three times brighter on the lettering and displays.  So keep that in mind for the future.

Bill
« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 08:09:01 AM by Bill N »
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Ernie n Tara

  • ---
  • Posts: 3371
  • Life is Good - Together
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2017, 08:48:57 AM »
I have mono vision and adapted easily. Actually, I think I could have just had the far seeing eye done as I was very near sighted.  Subsequent to Lasic I had a detached retina in the far eye that changed the vision to near sighted. I elected cateract surgery on that eye to restore far sight; worked quite well. Incidentally, the main difference I observed with mono vision was less brightness. That is I need more light to see clearly.

A caution - after the buckle is used to correct a detached retina, it is rare but blood leakage can form a blister on the eye. I had one and the dr diagnosed incorrectly as cancer and instructed me to have the eye removed. Fortunately his pardner disagreed with his diagnosis and I got a third opinion. Actually just pierced the blister (bubble) to drain it. Scarey stuff!

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
2012 Jeep Rubicon - Dozer (orange - kinda)
2006 Jeep Wrangler

8Muddypaws

  • ---
  • Posts: 2387
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2017, 02:57:09 PM »
Mrs. Muddypaws got her left eye done a couple of weeks ago.  She breezed through the surgery and now had perfect eyesight in that eye.  Like many her comment was "why did I wait so long?"
Retired computer professional
Musician, songwriter and music director
2006 Bounder 34H, 2008 CR-V Toad

ArdraF

  • ---
  • Posts: 9898
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2017, 05:19:55 PM »
I've worn glasses since before I started school because my poor sister almost flunked first grade.  She couldn't see the blackboard!  I'm very farsighted.  Back in the 1970s I tried the new soft contact lenses.  They were wonderful for about a week - except I didn't recognize that person in the mirror!  Then my eyes started getting extremely "scratchy" and it affected me enough that the girls I worked with told me I had given them a fair try and needed to ditch them before I drove THEM crazy!  That little episode caused a permanent dry eye condition made worse by allergies.  I'm intending to put off cataract surgery as long as possible because I use prescription eye drops to prevent the itching but sometimes they're so bad I really rub my eyes a lot.  It seems logical that rubbing like that would be bad with implanted lenses.  Luckily my cataracts are very slow growing.

By the way, YAG lasers are used when that "film" develops.  It's kind of like a scar tissue.  Jerry thought he might need it but the doctor (who has done thousands of cataract surgeries) says he doesn't need it.  The first night we went out and I drove but he said the lights really bothered him.  He's definitely more sensitive to light now than he was and prefers to sit at tables facing away from windows when it's bright outside.

Mother had her cataract surgeries when she was around 75 and said her vision was like when she was 20.

This has been an interesting and very informative discussion.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

grashley

  • ---
  • Posts: 4183
  • Western KY for now.
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #26 on: November 27, 2017, 09:41:01 PM »
Jim,
My cataract surgery experience last summer is virtually identical to yours.  I've worn glasses for 60 years, too!  My biggest issue is the ingrained memory.  I still want to take off my glasses, which I no longer wear, when I go to bed, and put them on in the morning.  After my first eye was done, I noticed the "new" eye saw brighter and whiter, while the "old" eye saw yellow and a bit fuzzy.  My night vision is improved.

Rene, hold out for cataracts!  With Medicare and a supplement, my total out of pocket cost was $$$-0-!  One script was expensive, so Dr used a different med which my ins did cover.
Preacher Gordon, DW Debbie
09 Grand Junction 35 TMS  Progressive HW50C
Andersen Ultimate hitch
2013 F350 Lariat LB SRW Supercab diesel 4X4
Nimrod Series 70 popup (sold)
It's not a dumb question if you do not know the answer.

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2017, 11:32:11 PM »
Thanks to all who have told of their experiences and others that shared their knowledge. I now have things that I know to look out for, such as safety glasses and "fog" or secondary cataracts. I hope that all you old people have benefited from this thread as much as I have.
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #28 on: November 28, 2017, 04:49:42 AM »
Thanks to all who have told of their experiences and others that shared their knowledge. I now have things that I know to look out for, such as safety glasses and "fog" or secondary cataracts. I hope that all you old people have benefited from this thread as much as I have.

Thanks Half for starting this thread. I learnt an awful lot. I'm going to wait till I get the cataracts before doing anything like Gordon said. I was talking to the DW last night and I was wondering if I should wish for cataracts or let mother nature take it's course.   ???
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

kjansen

  • ---
  • Posts: 1290
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #29 on: November 28, 2017, 08:11:50 AM »
Halfwright, did you have laser surgery to do your cataracts?  I had mine done a year ago and she did it with a scalpel, never had injections, just a couple of drops.  I have a slight astigmatism, which could be corrected with the new lens, but Medicare does not cover that lens.  Will have to get glasses to correct that plus I need to have progressive lenses to cover my reading needs.
Keven Jansen
'06 Chevy 2500 Duramax
'02 Montana Big Sky
Alexandria, Mn

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3820
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #30 on: November 28, 2017, 08:15:19 AM »
My wife and I have both had cataract surgery and been very pleased with the results. She was 68 for hers, and I was 71 for mine. Our Medicare Advantage plans paid all but about $200 in procedure and drug co-pays. Our dog even had the surgery at Cornell University Vet Hospital when she was 12 years old and nearly blind with cataracts, and it made a very noticeable difference in her quality of life.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #31 on: November 28, 2017, 09:54:37 AM »
Keven,

It was a laser.

Another thing I learned is that taking Flomax , Tamsulosin or any medicine for urine control can cause problems in the surgery in some cases. There is a work-around for it,  but the surgeon needs to know if you are taking the medicine.

Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #32 on: November 28, 2017, 10:55:15 AM »
Keven,

It was a laser.

Another thing I learned is that taking Flomax , Tamsulosin or any medicine for urine control can cause problems in the surgery in some cases. There is a work-around for it,  but the surgeon needs to know if you are taking the medicine.

Jim - According to the surgeon who repositioned my IOL's, Flomax, Tamsulosin, or any of the other prostate medications are Alpha blockers and alpha blockers dissolve the zonules - the tiny fibers that hold the lens capsule in place - and that is what caused my problem. When the first one had to be repositioned in February, he told me it would only be a matter of time, not if, that the other eye would have the same problem. And it did, seven months later. Dissolving celluloid, which is what the zonules are made of, is one of the additional affects of these drugs. It would have been nice if my primary care doctor who perscribed these meds to me would have told me of the future risks, knowing that my lens had already been replaced and the zonules had been weakened.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #33 on: November 28, 2017, 11:19:37 AM »
Jim - According to the surgeon who repositioned my IOL's, Flomax, Tamsulosin, or any of the other prostate medications are Alpha blockers and alpha blockers dissolve the zonules - the tiny fibers that hold the lens capsule in place - and that is what caused my problem. When the first one had to be repositioned in February, he told me it would only be a matter of time, not if, that the other eye would have the same problem. And it did, seven months later. Dissolving celluloid, which is what the zonules are made of, is one of the additional affects of these drugs. It would have been nice if my primary care doctor who perscribed these meds to me would have told me of the future risks, knowing that my lens had already been replaced and the zonules had been weakened.

WOW.  Now that is news to me and I do take Tamsulosin so I am going to check this out right away.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #34 on: November 28, 2017, 11:39:31 AM »
I also take tamsulosin and have for about 8 years. There was no problem during the surgery, but I am concerned about continuing to take it. I do not know if the problem is cumulative or how wide spread it is. I, too, am going to talk to my primary physician. I was told to stop taking tamsulosin and warfarin 4 days prior to surgery. But, from John's experience, the effects might be cumulative. Now another thing to worry about.

Bill, let us know what you find out.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 11:58:31 AM by halfwright »
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

ConductorX

  • ---
  • Posts: 27
  • Skully Wood and Metal
    • Class A Adventures
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #35 on: November 28, 2017, 02:36:40 PM »
I am very nearsighted and I have worn glasses since I was 5 years old.  In my late 50s I was diagnosed with cataracts.  In 2014 I had a detached retina and needed a repair.  Not fun.  The cataracts were repaired with new lens later in the year.  I had bad astigmatism along with bad nearsighted vision.  I tested out with 20/20 in my right eye and 20/30 in the left.

This year my right eye was getting cloudy again and I was told I needed a procedure to remove the membrane behind the lens.  This was a laser procedure and only took a few minutes to fully restore my vision.  I have 20/20 in both eyes now. 

I can't speak to other medications, I only take a baby aspirin each day and nothing else.

"CX"  now 62
ConductorX
2004 Thor Windsport 34W - Ford V-10 Gas
2006 Toyota Sienna - TOAD (Primary)
1974 VW Thing - TOAD (Secondary)

https://classaadventures.blogspot.com/

ArdraF

  • ---
  • Posts: 9898
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #36 on: November 28, 2017, 02:46:30 PM »
Quote
Will have to get glasses to correct that plus I need to have progressive lenses to cover my reading needs.

If you haven't had progressive lenses before do talk with your optician about the difference between them and bi- or tri-focals with lines.  Not everyone can adjust to them.  Jerry tried them and finds the ones with lines more to his liking.  I don't believe I would like them and I'm used to the lines.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

kdbgoat

  • ---
  • Posts: 4931
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #37 on: November 28, 2017, 02:56:28 PM »
I have to wear lined bifocals. I suffer from vertigo really bad with progressive lens.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

MN Blue Skies

  • ---
  • Posts: 1175
  • Favorite saying: "It depends."
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #38 on: November 28, 2017, 04:00:08 PM »
Hi Max,
I was kinda bumbed when the doctor said I was not a candidate at this time. We're going on a 10 day cruise the end of January and was looking forward and was all siked (spelling?) up to not need glasses before the cruise.
Yes I decided against it for 2 reasons. One was that I may get cataracts anytime in the future and having it done now, it would have been a waste of money and two, it would have cost $9000.00.  :'( (:(
I'll wait till I need it done. 
I need to hear from more people who had the "mono vision" surgery.  Right now, I would do the distance and live with having to wear glasses for reading. I don't read much anyway.

I am definitely unhappy with mono vision.  A good doc would let you try contacts to see if you can tolerate mono vision.  Eric is happy that he had both eyes adjusted for distance.  BTW, if given a second chance I would never have opted for Lasik.  I was never a good candidate considering my age and my visual needs for activities I enjoy. 
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 04:06:32 PM by MN Blue Skies »
A girl called Max, her husband Eric, Princess Kitty, and Molly the Service Dog in training.

2013 Cougar High Country 315 RES ( A 35' 5th Wheel)
"Big Blue" 2012 RAM 3500 Big Horn (Cummins Diesel 1 ton)

MN Blue Skies

  • ---
  • Posts: 1175
  • Favorite saying: "It depends."
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #39 on: November 28, 2017, 04:24:20 PM »
MN Blue Skies sounds like he or she had an incompetent eye surgeon. LASIK should not hurt other than a bit of stinging for about a day that a couple of aspirin or Tylenol can alleviate. Someone else brought up the point of making sure your doctor has performed the surgery of any kind - cataract or LASIK - numerous times. Going to a doctor that performs eight or nine surgeries in one day means nothing. You want to find a doctor who has performed this surgery a minimum of 10,000 times. A good doctor would have not waited to suggest contacts until after the surgery to determine if you could tolerate mono vision, but instead, prescribe you contacts prior to the surgery and ask you to wear them for a month. Please do not assume that LASIK is not good for anyone just because you had a bad experience. I'm very sorry that this happened to you, but I think it was due to the individual doctor, not the overall procedure.

John, the doctor who did my Lasik surgery has performed over 98,000 procedures.  Possibly more than any other doctor in Minnesota.  I think his practice has devolved into a Lasik mill.  I absolutely agree that he should have given me the option of trying contacts for mono vision.  Beyond the problems with the mono vision I also have problems with ghosting, halos, etc.  It's extremely difficult for driving much less driving with an RV.  (Depth perception is a common problem with mono vision.) I understand that many people are happy with Lasik but there is no going back for those of us who have had problems.  I'm very glad this subject came up so that people who are considering Lasik realize that there can be a downside.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 04:40:47 PM by MN Blue Skies »
A girl called Max, her husband Eric, Princess Kitty, and Molly the Service Dog in training.

2013 Cougar High Country 315 RES ( A 35' 5th Wheel)
"Big Blue" 2012 RAM 3500 Big Horn (Cummins Diesel 1 ton)

MN Blue Skies

  • ---
  • Posts: 1175
  • Favorite saying: "It depends."
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #40 on: November 28, 2017, 04:36:25 PM »
We should clarify that there is a big difference between Lasik surgery and Cataract surgery.  I think the OP (Rene) was talking about Lasik.  I'm sure he will correct me if I'm wrong.   ;)
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 04:48:19 PM by MN Blue Skies »
A girl called Max, her husband Eric, Princess Kitty, and Molly the Service Dog in training.

2013 Cougar High Country 315 RES ( A 35' 5th Wheel)
"Big Blue" 2012 RAM 3500 Big Horn (Cummins Diesel 1 ton)

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #41 on: November 28, 2017, 04:45:17 PM »
I also take tamsulosin and have for about 8 years. There was no problem during the surgery, but I am concerned about continuing to take it. I do not know if the problem is cumulative or how wide spread it is. I, too, am going to talk to my primary physician. I was told to stop taking tamsulosin and warfarin 4 days prior to surgery. But, from John's experience, the effects might be cumulative. Now another thing to worry about.

Bill, let us know what you find out.

I sent a message to my eye doctor today - no reply yet.  I also have scoured the internet and find that tamsulosin does have an effect on vision  but the exact timing is unclear.  One source says it causes something like (as best I recall) floppy iris symptoms DURING cataract surgery but that if the surgeon knows you are taking it he can take alternative measures.  Another guy went on and on and finally he started pushing his snake oil and I dropped him right away.  Still looking but my checkup today following the laser film removal showed everything in good shape five years after the cataract surgery.  Still looking.  One note: Several sources say do not take the Tamsulosin at bedtime  (I have been) and to take it at mealtime so I will put it on the supper table from now on.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

UTTransplant

  • ---
  • Posts: 1135
  • Cedar Falls, Iowa
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #42 on: November 28, 2017, 05:14:39 PM »
We should clarify that there is a big difference between Lasik surgery and Cataract surgery.  I think the OP (Rene) was talking about Lasik.  I'm sure he will correct me if I'm wrong.   ;)
The OP was talking about cataract surgery while Rene, the second poster, started talking about LASIK. Totally different surgeries, and this thread is a mess with both discussions happening simultaneously.

That being said, I have never met anyone who regretted cataract surgery, but I know a few who regret their LASIK. There is definitely a possibility of complications in LASIK as any decent doctor will tell you. They arenít common, but they happen.
Pam and Kevin plus Lily the cat
2014 Outdoors RV Timber Ridge 240RKS
2015 Ram 2500 Diesel
Tiffin 37PA on order
http://toobusyforwork.com

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3820
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #43 on: November 28, 2017, 06:15:22 PM »
If you haven't had progressive lenses before do talk with your optician about the difference between them and bi- or tri-focals with lines.  Not everyone can adjust to them.  Jerry tried them and finds the ones with lines more to his liking.  I don't believe I would like them and I'm used to the lines.

ArdraF

I agree that a talk with the doctor is in order before deciding on progressive lenses. In my case, I've had progressives beginning with my first pair of glasses, and wouldn't have anything else. For my cataract surgery, I chose distance optimized lenses, thinking that I'd rather be able to drive without glasses, and my wife chose reading lenses for her surgery. I'm so used to wearing glasses all the time though, that I opted to still have progressive lenses, with the upper portion basically clear. The progressive lens gives me a good focal range from close up for fine print out to infinity that I find very useful for working at varying distances. My wife on the other hand, is constantly switching between glasses and no glasses and seems to be happy doing that.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #44 on: November 28, 2017, 06:16:45 PM »
Thanks, Bill,

I found about the same thing.  Tamsulosin "might " cause problems in surgery in about 3% of the patients, or victims, depending on your outlook. But, I could not find anything  about what would happen down the road. The doctor that did the surgery said to go back to taking it.
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #45 on: November 28, 2017, 07:44:47 PM »
Jim and Bill - I haven't researched the subject of Tamsulosin and/or Finasteride causing deterioration of the celluloid tissue in the body and am only going by what this specialist told me. He said that taking one or the other gives you a 3-5% chance of problems and taking both, which are usually prescribed together by most urologists, will increase the chance to 15-20% depending on your own body chemistry and how well it tolerates the drug(s). When it comes to eye problems, it seems I have always fallen into the high risk category. There is only a 4% chance of having a retina detachment when other factors are not presented. I had them in both eyes, so go figure. When he told me the second eye was a "when" rather than an "if", I assume he has already determined that if it was going to happen to me in one eye, it would affect both. Other men may not have the same issues with the drugs.

I find it interesting that you mentioned that Tamsulosin should not be taken at night. Can you tell me why? The reason I ask is because I have taken both it and Finasteride an hour or so before bedtime for a couple of years since I was having a lot of problems when getting up in the middle of the night. I mentioned this to my PCP (the same one who prescribed them without telling me the side effects) and he seemed to think taking them before bed was a good idea. I fired this guy about seven months ago, so if I find out this is another mistake on his part, it won't surprise me, but I would like concrete substantiation about when to take the drugs before confronting him with it.

MN Blue Skies - I am really sorry to hear of your LASIK experience and you are absolutely correct when you say that it is not for everyone. Some cannot tolerate it as well as needed and some simply do not have the physical traits needed for it. You're probably right about your doctor becoming a turn and burn mill if he has performed that many surgeries and cannot or will not take the time to address individual concerns regarding possible complications or poor fits. There are quite a few of them out there, just like there are good chiropractors and then there are the quacks. The doctor who performed my LASIK procedures (3 of them) was one of the five who collaborated on the first VISX LASIK machine and was named one of the top 100 doctors in the country for many years. I got lucky again with my present refractive surgeon who repositioned my IOLs this year, with him being another who has been named in the top 100 every year since 2003. Both of these doctors are pioneers in their field and are good enough to know the possible complications a patient may have depending on how their eye may respond. I got my LASIK procedures for the sole reason of getting my vision back to what it was before the detachments occurred, since the scleral buckles they put around the eyeball to squeeze the retina back into place elongate the eyeball, which creates an automatic near sightedness. After having several surgeries on each eye, I didn't want to settle for having to wear glasses or contacts again; hence, the LASIK. I have also had my problems with it with halos around lights at night being the biggest issue, and that is why I limit my driving at night to cars only. I have driven my coach at night three times in three years, only when absolutely necessary. Being up high gives me a much better view of what is in front of me, but trying to see what's behind me in the mirrors can be difficult at best and nearly impossible at worst. When we are on vacation, this doesn't present a problem since we are usually off the road by 3-5 PM anyway. I have never had a problem with depth perception since getting mono vision, possibly because the two visions are close enough together. Now, since I had the left lens repositioned and the doctor wasn't able to put it back in its proper focal point, giving me 20/60-20/100 variable vision (the eye is damaged from the detachment so the vision varies all the time), when I wear a contact in the right (distance) eye to get the vision from 20/30 down to 20/20, I have a difficult time blending the two together because sometimes they are simply too far apart for the brain to compensate. When that happens, I lose my depth perception entirely. But if I wear contacts in both eyes so the right is seeing 20/20 and the left is seeing 20/40, I have no problems at all with either blending or depth perception. I'm waiting until six months after the last surgery to go back and have the doctor give me LASIK on the left (reading) eye for the third time so I don't have to wear contacts. I can get by with 20/30 in the distance eye most of the time, only really needing it when driving the coach and having the need to see as far in front as possible. Legally, as long as one eye sees 20/40, you're all right in most states, if not all.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #46 on: November 29, 2017, 06:36:06 AM »
The OP was talking about cataract surgery while Rene, the second poster, started talking about LASIK. Totally different surgeries, and this thread is a mess with both discussions happening simultaneously.

That being said, I have never met anyone who regretted cataract surgery, but I know a few who regret their LASIK. There is definitely a possibility of complications in LASIK as any decent doctor will tell you. They arenít common, but they happen.
You are correct.  We are starting to get apples and oranges mixed here.  Need to be clear which we are talking about. 

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #47 on: November 29, 2017, 06:38:30 AM »
Thanks, Bill,

I found about the same thing.  Tamsulosin "might " cause problems in surgery in about 3% of the patients, or victims, depending on your outlook. But, I could not find anything  about what would happen down the road. The doctor that did the surgery said to go back to taking it.

Thanks Jim.  I tend to get overexcited about stuff like this. But like you I have been taking the stuff for years and have only noticed one side effect and that one could also be caused by age......lol.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #48 on: November 29, 2017, 06:46:57 AM »

I find it interesting that you mentioned that Tamsulosin should not be taken at night. Can you tell me why? The reason I ask is because I have taken both it and Finasteride an hour or so before bedtime for a couple of years since I was having a lot of problems when getting up in the middle of the night. I mentioned this to my PCP (the same one who prescribed them without telling me the side effects) and he seemed to think taking them before bed was a good idea. I fired this guy about seven months ago, so if I find out this is another mistake on his part, it won't surprise me, but I would like concrete substantiation about when to take the drugs before confronting him with it.


John, I was always taking it at bedtime along with one other drug but in doing the small bit of research I find that they recommend it be taken with the evening meal so I guess that they prefer to have it dissolve with food.  It always is amazing how many side effects that drugs can have and probably one of the good things the government has done is make it mandatory to disclose them to the user.  I sometimes laugh at the TV drug adds where they side effects go on longer than the positive points of the med.   Some even include "death" as a side effect.  I bet they cringe when they have to include that.  I just changed my timing to taking Tamsulosin with the meal and hope that means that I can drain a lot of fluids before I go to bed (and not get up at 3AM).
It doesn't help that we have a new pup who until only recently was getting me up at 2 am and 4 am and I was heading to the bathroom also at midnight.  As the pup has grown to only one 5 am trip, I am also down to one trip per night.....lol

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #49 on: November 29, 2017, 06:50:32 AM »
The OP was talking about cataract surgery while Rene, the second poster, started talking about LASIK. Totally different surgeries, and this thread is a mess with both discussions happening simultaneously.

I want to apologize. I'm learning everyday and I didn't know there was a difference. I was mistaken when the lasik center I went to would do the surgery by implanting a lense. But I opted to wait because of the cost. So I thought the procedures were the same. Sorry everyone. Please, no more talk about LASIK. Someone start another post if they want to talk about LASIK.
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #50 on: November 29, 2017, 08:17:00 AM »
John, I was always taking it at bedtime along with one other drug but in doing the small bit of research I find that they recommend it be taken with the evening meal so I guess that they prefer to have it dissolve with food.  It always is amazing how many side effects that drugs can have and probably one of the good things the government has done is make it mandatory to disclose them to the user.  I sometimes laugh at the TV drug adds where they side effects go on longer than the positive points of the med.   Some even include "death" as a side effect.  I bet they cringe when they have to include that.  I just changed my timing to taking Tamsulosin with the meal and hope that means that I can drain a lot of fluids before I go to bed (and not get up at 3AM).
It doesn't help that we have a new pup who until only recently was getting me up at 2 am and 4 am and I was heading to the bathroom also at midnight.  As the pup has grown to only one 5 am trip, I am also down to one trip per night.....lol

Bill

Bill - Good to hear your nightly trips are reducing for both reasons. We just got a 4 yr old rescue smooth Collie that has to remain crated at night and he wakes us up about an hour before we want to get up every morning. But at least he stays quiet throughout the night most of the time, only barking when he hears something outside. Our 20 month old rough Collie is good for the entire night.

I have always been fortunate in being able to limit my nightly trips to the bathroom to only one or two. But before I began taking the drugs right before bed, it would take me 20 minutes before being able to return to bed. Now, it's more like 5-10 minutes. About once every two years, I get so tired from lack of sleep that I don't wake up for seven hours and sleep straight through. That's one of the reasons I don't drive OTR anymore and take extra care when driving the coach, especially at night. And it doesn't seem to matter which bed I'm in - while on the road in the coach, there is no change. Every four hours, I'm up.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #51 on: December 01, 2017, 06:28:24 AM »
I did receive a reply from my eye doctor regarding the Flo-Max/Tamsulosin question I asked.  Here it is:

"Tamsulosin does have ocular side effects, however, it affects the iris and not the zonules. This is important during cataract surgery which you already had 5 years ago. The smooth muscle dilator of the iris becomes affected, and the pupil will often not dilate well complicating cataract surgery. The zonules do hold the lens capsule/bag in place but I have never heard of Flomax affecting the zonules. A quick search into the medical literature did not present any reports of this either. I think you are perfectly fine using Flomax at this time since you already had cataract surgery in both eyes. Let me know if you have any further questions."

I will continue my Tamsulosin as I quit only a few days ago and am not seeing an effect in very slow urination.



Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #52 on: December 01, 2017, 09:03:02 AM »
Bill,

Thank you for the information.
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #53 on: December 01, 2017, 07:37:26 PM »
Bill - I have always found it interesting that you can ask 10 doctors for an opinion, theory or fact regarding a subject and get 10 different answers. Accordingly, I have always maintained the opinion that medicine is more of an art than a science. I cannot argue with what your doctor told you because I honestly don't know if he is right or if my doctor is correct. I can, however, tell you that my doctor predicted the deterioration of the zonules in the second eye prior to the surgery performed on the first eye due to my use of alpha blockers and he was correct. Was it a lucky guess? Maybe. Or maybe he knows something that other doctors do not because of his research. I'm not going to say he is right and your doctor is wrong, but my results speak for themselves. I certainly would not change your lifestyle if your doctor tells you it isn't necessary.

Thank you for checking this out. I am always open to other opinions that may influence my own thinking.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #54 on: December 02, 2017, 07:56:12 AM »
Bill - I have always found it interesting that you can ask 10 doctors for an opinion, theory or fact regarding a subject and get 10 different answers. Accordingly, I have always maintained the opinion that medicine is more of an art than a science. I cannot argue with what your doctor told you because I honestly don't know if he is right or if my doctor is correct. I can, however, tell you that my doctor predicted the deterioration of the zonules in the second eye prior to the surgery performed on the first eye due to my use of alpha blockers and he was correct. Was it a lucky guess? Maybe. Or maybe he knows something that other doctors do not because of his research. I'm not going to say he is right and your doctor is wrong, but my results speak for themselves. I certainly would not change your lifestyle if your doctor tells you it isn't necessary.

Thank you for checking this out. I am always open to other opinions that may influence my own thinking.

Totally agree with you John.  I don't know a zonule from a hole in the ground but we have to rely on somebody or some bit of information on just about everything in life.  For now, I am back on the Tamsulosin as I had started to revert to the long duration at the urinal problem.  Kicked me right back into high flow.......lol  Thanks John.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

HueyPilotVN

  • ---
  • Posts: 1336
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #55 on: December 02, 2017, 12:59:23 PM »
Totally agree with you John.  I don't know a zonule from a hole in the ground but we have to rely on somebody or some bit of information on just about everything in life.  For now, I am back on the Tamsulosin as I had started to revert to the long duration at the urinal problem.  Kicked me right back into high flow.......lol  Thanks John.

Bill

Since the conversation has turned to the subject of Zonules I thought I would supply a little insight, (pun intended), about Zonules.

When I started assisting in Cataract Surgery in the early 70's, the older normal procedure was to remove the Lens, (cataract) intact from the eye through a fairly large opening made by using a scalpel to make an incision around the Cornea for almost half of the upper perimeter of the eye.

This large opening was needed to remove the lens with the capsule intact.  After making the incision but prior to removing the lens we would inject an enzyme solution called "Alpha Chymar" into the eye.  This solution would dissolve the Zonules.  Maybe a better word for the Zonules would be "Ligiments". 

The earlier version of Cataract Surgery definitely required two people to perform different functions during surgery.  My job was to pull back the Cornea with a suture to create a large opening while the surgeon would touch a freezing probe to the lens to create an icy attachment and then deliver the intact lens thru the opening after the Zonules had been dissolved.

The Zonules have more than one function.  They do hold and position the lens in place just behind the Iris and centered in the eye.  They also control the shape of the lens by pulling on the edge of the lens to change the refractive power of the lens allowing you to focus up close or far away.  This ability is greatest when young and is reduced as we age.  That is the reason that we lose the ability to focus up close as we get older.  The lens is not as pliable and the zonules do not have as much effect.  The removal of the natural lens with it's ability to change focus is also why we need readers, bifocals, or one eye near and one eye far solutions.

Just thought you might like a little more information about Zonules.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 01:07:14 PM by HueyPilotVN »
Bill Waugh
40' Country Coach DP
34' Stacker Trailer, Trailer Toad
Jeep Commander
Mustang Bracket Race Car
35 years on the road

halfwright

  • ---
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #56 on: December 02, 2017, 04:30:12 PM »
Bill,

If I carry this line of thought another step, the zonules are not attached to the new inserted lens.  So, if the tamsulosin did dissolve them, it would have no affect on the new lens.  Or am I missing something?
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, half poodle-- half garbage disposal
All in a
2007 Montana Mountaineer
2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

HueyPilotVN

  • ---
  • Posts: 1336
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #57 on: December 02, 2017, 06:11:10 PM »
Jim,

Different IOLs, (Intraocular Lens) are held in place with sometimes different mechanisms.  The early Implants were placed with feet or extensions that fit in front and behind the iris.  You have to remember that the old style surgery removed the entire lens with the capsule, (outer covering) intact by dissolving the zonules.

The newer and better type of surgery uses a very much smaller incision and removes the cloudy contents of the lens in small pieces while leaving the outer back and side layers of the capsule attached to the zonules.

I was just trying to describe what the Zonules are.

If the implant is in the bag, (remaining capsule) then you would certainly want the zonules to remain attached.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 06:13:26 PM by HueyPilotVN »
Bill Waugh
40' Country Coach DP
34' Stacker Trailer, Trailer Toad
Jeep Commander
Mustang Bracket Race Car
35 years on the road

John Stephens

  • ---
  • Posts: 456
  • Vacations begin when you leave the driveway
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #58 on: December 02, 2017, 07:21:34 PM »
Yes, zonules are used for accommodation, which is the ability to see near or far, by stretching or compressing the lens to change its shape and accordingly, it focal point. And with the newer cataract surgeries, the zonules are not dissolved or removed unless necessary to access the lens. When I had my cataract surgeries done in 2000, my surgeon used a method unknown to me to break the old lens into small fragments and then suction them out of the capsule. He then inserted the new IOL which had springy "feet" on them that would attach themselves to the inside of the capsule. The trick is to get the IOL in the correct position, something a competent surgeon with plenty of experience can do without problem.

If you have no zonules, there is no way for the capsule containing the lens, whether the original or an IOL, to stay in place, because the zonules are what keeps the lens from falling into the retina. That is what my problem was - my zonules dissolved. My left eye always had 25% of the zonules missing, discovered by my surgeon when he did the cataract surgery on that eye. Interestingly, when the latest surgeon did the repositioning procedure, there were still roughly 50% of the zonules remaining, having caught the problem in time. The right eye, however, had 97% of its zonules dissolved by the time we did the surgery, which is what made it an emergency procedure, performed 48 hours after it was diagnosed.

I misspoke when I said that zonules are made of celluloid. That would make it sound like old movie film. They are a cillial material, not quite muscle and not quite ligament, but as Huey noted, they can be considered ligament. They are flexible enough to be able to tighten or loosen to change the shape of the lens in its capsule.

As far as the Alpha blocker medications I am taking - Tamsulosin and Finasteride - I never stopped taking them after being told by my doctor that they were causing the problem because I knew it was only going to be a matter of time before the other eye needed attention. And if I stopped taking them, my urinary problems would become severe.
John
Cape Coral, Fl.
2005 Winnebago Adventurer 38J
Acme EZ Tow Dolly and 2007 Azera

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #59 on: December 03, 2017, 07:28:45 AM »
What a forum!  Where else on the internet can you find out how to clean out a black tank, decide which RV park to stop at in Indiana, determine if you have a slide problem and have an indepth discussion of zonules? The RV Forum is tops and while I am not fully understanding AAZ (all about Zonules), I sure am happy to read and get the gist of what they do and how they affect the eye.  Meanwhile, I am happy to report that my flow is normal and my vision is about as good as it is going to get in the future.  Thanks folks for all of the information on this forum.  I never feel hesitant to ask a question as I now know there are others out there who have the answers or at least suggestions as to what the problem may be.  Lately this thread and another on oxygen concentrators have increased my knowledge of things important in my life.  Let's keep on keeping on and thanks to Tom and all the moderators for keeping this train on the tracks.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

Rene T

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 10850
  • Every day is a payday and every payday I have off
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #60 on: December 03, 2017, 08:02:06 AM »
What a forum!  Where else on the internet can you find out how to clean out a black tank, decide which RV park to stop at in Indiana, determine if you have a slide problem and have an indepth discussion of zonules? The RV Forum is tops and while I am not fully understanding AAZ (all about Zonules), I sure am happy to read and get the gist of what they do and how they affect the eye.  Meanwhile, I am happy to report that my flow is normal and my vision is about as good as it is going to get in the future.  Thanks folks for all of the information on this forum.  I never feel hesitant to ask a question as I now know there are others out there who have the answers or at least suggestions as to what the problem may be.  Lately this thread and another on oxygen concentrators have increased my knowledge of things important in my life.  Let's keep on keeping on and thanks to Tom and all the moderators for keeping this train on the tracks.

Bill

And don't forget which is the best toilet paper to user.
Rene, Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

Dragginourbedaround

  • ---
  • Posts: 894
  • I look out the window and see trees, I'm camping
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #61 on: December 03, 2017, 03:18:02 PM »
And don't forget which is the best toilet paper to user.
Now you did it!  ;)
Gene

2013 Winnebago Adventurer 37F
2011 Honda Fit

Bill N

  • ---
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Cataract surgery
« Reply #62 on: December 04, 2017, 06:39:33 AM »
And don't forget which is the best toilet paper to user.
Uh Oh, now the thread goes down the toilet..............lol

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats Grace-11 & Squeak-6, Winnie the ShihTzu - 1

 

Hosted by Over The Network