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Author Topic: Older Fleetwood roof construction?  (Read 588 times)

wijames2002

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Older Fleetwood roof construction?
« on: November 28, 2017, 12:05:36 PM »
I have a 1998 Fleetwood Southwind Storm and can't seem to find any information of the roof construction of the unit. I want to remove an old Satellite dish and I noticed when I lift up slightly on the dish arm, it seems very shaky like there is nothing under where it is attached. Does anyone have any experience with the older Fleetwood models?
1998 Fleetwood Southwind Storm
Chevy 454
2018 Kia Soul in tow.
"Liam lV" hearing service dog as co-pilot

"People will forget the things you say or do but they will always remember the way you make them feel"

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Older Fleetwood roof construction?
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2017, 07:18:44 PM »
I don't have the details (call Fleetwood and ask), but basically it is a rather thin luan plywood skin over wood or metal cross members, then covered with a membrane (almost surely EPDM rubber on a vintage Storm).  It's not very rigid and you can probably apply a fair amount of leverage with the satellite arm.

The dish is probably just screwed into the luan plywood.  Even though the wind speeds are high during travel, things on the roof rarely come loose unless you actually hit something (tree limbs or overhead wires!). The forces are almost entire sideways (shear), not lifting or pulling.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

wijames2002

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  • Posts: 168
  • "The cure for all problems is sun and saltwater"
Re: Older Fleetwood roof construction?
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2017, 08:25:39 AM »
I don't have the details (call Fleetwood and ask), but basically it is a rather thin luan plywood skin over wood or metal cross members, then covered with a membrane (almost surely EPDM rubber on a vintage Storm).  It's not very rigid and you can probably apply a fair amount of leverage with the satellite arm.

The dish is probably just screwed into the luan plywood.  Even though the wind speeds are high during travel, things on the roof rarely come loose unless you actually hit something (tree limbs or overhead wires!). The forces are almost entire sideways (shear), not lifting or pulling.

Thanks, Thats what I thought it might be.
1998 Fleetwood Southwind Storm
Chevy 454
2018 Kia Soul in tow.
"Liam lV" hearing service dog as co-pilot

"People will forget the things you say or do but they will always remember the way you make them feel"