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Author Topic: Going full time. What tools should I take?  (Read 575 times)

gregbart

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Going full time. What tools should I take?
« on: December 12, 2017, 10:37:06 PM »
Hi All,
  My wife and I are going full time in May.  We are really, really, looking forward to it.  We plan on doing a lot of campground hosting to help keep the cost down.  Plus, we are still in our early 50's and can't see ourselves not having a daily routine.  In fact, we are volunteering for the whole summer (May-September) in the Oregon State Park system.   
  Currently, I own a fairly successful handyman service.  I will be closing the business pretty soon and will be selling most of the tools. work trailers, etc., before we leave. 
   My question is.... what tools should I plan on bringing with us?  I have multiple sets of pneumatic and cordless tools along with all the hand tools.  I really hate to sell my tools now, for a dime on the dollar, only to re-buy them in a couple of months.   I'm thinking some PEX repair stuff, basic hand tools, multi-meter, and a few cordless tools. Am I missing anything?  Or, should I just take the absolute minimum and just buy what I may need?
   To be honest, I'm having troubles imagining not having my full complement of tools.  I really don't care about all the other downsizing, but my tools... that hurts.

Thanks,
Greg

Tom

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 11:50:14 PM »
Quote from: gregbart
I really don't care about all the other downsizing, but my tools... that hurts.

That's how I felt when we "sold everything" and moved the family 6,000 miles across the Atlantic. Arrived in California, and bought my first Sears Craftsman screwdrivers for $0.99 each.

This subject has come up a number of times in the past. Click the Search button above and search on "tools" (without the quotes) to find some of those prior discussions.
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Memtb

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2017, 07:15:11 AM »
    Tools are just a small part of the things I couldn’t part with,to go full time. I guess when I “check-out”, they’ll need a “track hoe” to dig the hole, for me and the my stuff  ;D
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 07:16:53 AM by Memtb »
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kdbgoat

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2017, 07:58:40 AM »
A good example to follow is Bill's (Heuy Pilot) set up. ;D
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SeilerBird

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 08:11:18 AM »
I am a retired electrician and it thrilled me to death to get rid of all my tools. I am retired and the last thing I want to see is a frigging tool. Space and weight are way too valuable to a full timer to waste it bringing stuff you may never need. Take nothing and buy it as you need it.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2017, 08:32:51 AM »
Quote
I'm thinking some PEX repair stuff, basic hand tools, multi-meter, and a few cordless tools. Am I missing anything?

Your list is a good one for everybody.  For the rest, it depends largely on what you are comfortable doing yourself. I do woodworking as a hobby, so brought along a few clamps, glue, a small saw and wood finishing tools to make cabinet repairs.   Those who are accomplished auto mechanics probably want some more robust wrenches and a good sized jack in case they need to do a roadside suspension repair.

A couple of random but related thoughts:
1. If you have the ratchet driver with you, you can always buy whatever size sockets are needed for a particular job
2. Many RV parks have strict limitations on what repairs are allowed - they don't want the mess and the risk that you will disable the rig and not be able to move out.
3. There aren't many routine things that you need a power tool for on an RV
4. Plumbing supplies are readily available and you don't need much in the way of tools with push-fit and Flare-it Pex connectors. About the only extra tool is a Pex cutting plier.
Gary
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SargeW

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2017, 09:24:35 AM »
With your skills Greg, I would try to take as much as you feel comfortable carrying, just not doubles. I too try to have a selection of tools to handle whatever may come up. You didn't say what kind of RV and how big it is, as that can define what you carry with you.   A few things I found necessary:

1) A self contained socket set to handle minor vehicle repairs. Mine is in a plastic carry case. Decent quality, 3 size ratchets.
2) Battery operated tools, drill/ratchet set. Corded Jig Saw (change blades and cut anything). Multi purpose tool. Dremmel tool, corded (multi bit set in carry case).  An Inspection camera in a case. (Harbor Freight, not too expensive). Used this many time to see whats hidden in a tight spot. Battery operated leaf blower (use this a lot!).
3) A folding mechanics creeper. Scooting under the car or RV is way easier with one.
4) 3 ton bottle jack in case I want to do a rotation on the Jeep wheels.
5) Basic electric trouble shooting tools.  Volt meter ect.
6) Some storage trays for spare parts. Screws, nuts, bolts, wire connectors ect.
7) Plumbing repair stuff.
8) A place to put some fluids you may need or acquire.  Silicone, glue, lubes.

This may be excessive for some folks, but I have saved myself thousands of dollars through the years doing my own trouble shooting and repairs of things that are bound to go wrong. 

My battery operated tools I went with Home Depot's brand, Ridgid. This is do to their lifetime replacement policy on batteries and most battery operated tools. Other manufacturers now do a similar guarantee.

Here is a few pics to give you an idea. I am also driving a 40' Allegro Bus, so I have plenty of storage. Your ability to carry stuff will depend on your space.  There is also a need to carry the camp set up stuff. Chairs, maybe a rug, BBQ, table ect.  And the last bit of advice, be organized so you can find all the stuff you carry!

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TonyDtorch

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Re: Going full time. What tools should I take?
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2017, 02:04:10 PM »
Chances are If you overthink it you'll end up carrying around a whole bunch of extra weight that you will seldom use other than to loan it out to other people.

As a Retired shop owner....I sold all my Snap-on and Milwaukee stuff,  and I now have a bucket of the essential hand tools that it would take to repair a some of the typical RV stuff and a Home Depot battery drill/tool set.

  If I ever need an inch pound torque wrench or 17m/m deep swivel-socket... I will just buy a cheap one at Harbor Freight and throw it in the dumpster when the job is finished.

However, what I've found is... When people that worked with tools retire...they sell all their cool tools to the other guys that retire,     so there's usually this friendly retired guy in a huge motorhome that carries around a full garage with rollaways/welders etc...and he's just a couple spaces down from you.

 Are you retired or not... ;)
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 02:44:46 PM by TonyDtorch »

 

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