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Author Topic: RV panel electrical question  (Read 620 times)

Boonieman

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RV panel electrical question
« on: December 17, 2017, 06:46:56 PM »
We had a pole barn built last year and I installed an RV panel like you would find at a typical RV campground, it has a 30 amp, a 50 amp, and a 120v GFCI receptacle that were pre-wired on the panel. Each receptacle has its own breaker/breakers for each receptacle. We we considering having some friends down to camp this coming year. Can we plug both units into this panel at the same time, one of us using the 50 amp and the other using the 30 amps receptacles? The RV panel is being supplied from a 200 amp main panel inside the building via 80 amp double-pole breakers with a 50 foot run of #4 wire. I think it will be ok, but I wanted to hear if from folks with a lot more experience than me. Thanks!
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 06:48:39 PM by Boonieman »
2016 Chevrolet Dually/Duramax
2011 Fuzion 322
2016 Harley Trike
3 cherished dogs, Moo, Molly, Mia the one eyed pup 😊
Originally from South Dakota, currently reside in Kentucky

HueyPilotVN

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2017, 06:52:22 PM »
I think that you should be good to go.
Bill Waugh
40' Country Coach DP
2 Jeep Commanders
Mustang Bracket Race Car
Retired from the road to Lake Havasu after 35 years on the road

JackL

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2017, 07:04:05 PM »
Yes.
Asa matter of fact, I was in a RV store last week browsing and noticed a 50 amp plug that split to two 50 amp receptacles.
 it was advertised for motor homes that go to the auto races and wanted to park side by side or close to each other using one 50 amp supply.
 it is different from what you wanted to do, but could be an alternative way.

jack l

Boonieman

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2017, 07:07:00 PM »
Thanks fellas! Appreciate the replies. 🤙
2016 Chevrolet Dually/Duramax
2011 Fuzion 322
2016 Harley Trike
3 cherished dogs, Moo, Molly, Mia the one eyed pup 😊
Originally from South Dakota, currently reside in Kentucky

AStravelers

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2017, 12:00:47 PM »
We had a pole barn built last year and I installed an RV panel like you would find at a typical RV campground, it has a 30 amp, a 50 amp, and a 120v GFCI receptacle that were pre-wired on the panel. Each receptacle has its own breaker/breakers for each receptacle. We we considering having some friends down to camp this coming year. Can we plug both units into this panel at the same time, one of us using the 50 amp and the other using the 30 amps receptacles? The RV panel is being supplied from a 200 amp main panel inside the building via 80 amp double-pole breakers with a 50 foot run of #4 wire. I think it will be ok, but I wanted to hear if from folks with a lot more experience than me. Thanks!
You should be OK. 

Bottom line:
--  A 50 amp RV is really 50 amps on each hot leg (L1 & L2)
--  A 50 30 amp RV is only 30 amps on one hot leg. 

So if the 50amp RV maxed out the 50 amps on the same hot leg as the 30 amp RV, you could be pulling 80 amps the same amount as the CB in the main panel. 

As to the ability of the #4 wire to safely carry the 80amp for 50', check it with this wire size calculator: http://carpc.kyferez.com/Tools/ElectronicsCalculator.php?frame=/Tools/electronics/calcWireVDrop.html

edited by Ken
« Last Edit: December 19, 2017, 03:07:40 PM by Ken & Sheila »
Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado 4X4

http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2017, 08:26:22 PM »
Quote
A 50 amp RV is only 30 amps on one hot leg.
I believe he intended to say "A 30 amp RV is only 30 amps on one hot leg".
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

AStravelers

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2017, 03:05:51 PM »
You should be OK. 

Bottom line:
--  A 50 amp RV is really 50 amps on each hot leg (L1 & L2)
--  A 50 amp RV is only 30 amps on one hot leg. 

So if the 50amp RV maxed out the 50 amps on the same hot leg as the 30 amp RV, you could be pulling 80 amps the same amount as the CB in the main panel. 

As to the ability of the #4 wire to safely carry the 80amp for 50', check it with this wire size calculator: http://carpc.kyferez.com/Tools/ElectronicsCalculator.php?frame=/Tools/electronics/calcWireVDrop.html
OOPS!!!!  Yep that should have been "A 30 amp RV is only 30 amps on one hot leg. 

I would correct my posting, but the modify button is missing, so I can't correct my error.
Al & Sharon
2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R
2009 Chevy Colorado 4X4

http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/

John From Detroit

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2017, 05:13:38 PM »
Al.. If you got awards for Typo's.. I'd be the KING....

Seriously.. The modify button only hangs around for a short time. and Typos happen
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

Ken & Sheila

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2017, 06:29:07 PM »
I edited the original post to change to 50 to 30.

ken
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
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mralex

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2017, 08:49:48 PM »
According to NEC, (National Electrical Code),  #4 THHN is suitable for 95 amps,  #4 THWN is suitable for 85 amps and #4 THW is suitable for 70 amps.   THHN insulation is 90 degrees C, THWN is 75 degrees C and THW is 60 degrees C.  So insulation type is important but 99.99 percent of the wire theses days for these applications is THHN.  I don't think your going to see a significant voltage drop in just 50 feet either, if any, even if under a 60 percent load.   Happy Camping in the barn though, that's where mine is right now.
2014 Jayco Greyhawk 29MV, Van's RV9A, Cessna 150, Cessna 172 Skyhawk, '08 GL1800 Goldwing, '07 VTX 1300C, '06 VLX 600 Shadow, '15 F150, '16 Honda Pilot (toad)

Boonieman

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Re: RV panel electrical question
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 09:02:11 AM »
Mine is #4 THHN. Thanks for all the responses!! In retrospect, I should have asked these questions before I did the install. I did research it some, but at the time I wasn’t thinking of having two campers plugged in at the same time.
2016 Chevrolet Dually/Duramax
2011 Fuzion 322
2016 Harley Trike
3 cherished dogs, Moo, Molly, Mia the one eyed pup 😊
Originally from South Dakota, currently reside in Kentucky