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Author Topic: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides  (Read 539 times)

GeorgetownRyan

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Hi.
I'm Ryan from Georgetown Ontario. My wife, kids, dog, and I  bought a 14" (box) 1972 Glendale in Sept. We have gutted it, with goals to rebuild it over the winter.

I just found this forum and hope for some advise for my kitchen.

1) Kitchen countertops. I plan to build my own with laminate. With weight in mind, what thickness of plywood should I use? I would typically default to 3/4" but that seems unnecessary. Thoughts?
2) Drawer slides - It seems the RV world likes the single center RV slide over the matching side slides. Besides weight, is there any reason why?

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2017, 10:03:53 AM »
The countertops need to be rigid enough to span whatever the unsupported area is without flexing too much.  3/4" is good for most any size, but a smaller RV probably has modest counter space and you could probably make do with less. Plus, you can always install extra cross-bracing to eliminate flex. However, for the same reason the weight difference is very small, so I'd probably use the 3/4" and not worry about it.

Drawer slides: Higher line models use dual (side) slides. The single center slide is cheaper in both material and installation time.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2017, 10:05:31 AM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
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Ken & Sheila

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2017, 10:21:25 AM »
Today most mid to lower priced kitchen cabinets are made of 1/2" particleboard - some are even 3/8". For a trailer I would use 1/2" plywood, not particle board, for the cabinets and the countertop. Get a good grade of plywood that has more plys than the standard construction plywood. Be careful because a lot of "1/2" plywood is now actually 7/16".
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2017, 02:17:31 PM »
Ken is right, but I figured you had already decided to use plywood over particle board (MDF). A much better choice, in my opinion.

The actual size of any finished plywood is less than the nominal size, as a result of sanding/smoothing one or both sides.  Thus 3/4" plywood is usually 23/32", 1/2" is 15/32", and 1/4 is 7/32".   That also helps the manufacturer get a few more pieces out of each tree.  ::)   More sanding, e.g. an A or B grade finish, may result in even thinner sheets. Always measure if the dimension is critical.
Gary
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Drifterrider

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2018, 08:43:24 AM »
Have you considered butcher block counter tops like the ones from Ikea? 

kdbgoat

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2018, 05:57:41 AM »
Another thing to consider is overall weight. To save some weight where you don't need a lot of strength, maybe consider an open frame construction with a paneling cover. Even when using an open frame, a decent amount of strength can be built in.
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Punomatic

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Re: Kitchen build 1972 Glendale advice, counter tops and drawer slides
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2018, 09:20:27 AM »
Another thing to consider is overall weight. To save some weight where you don't need a lot of strength, maybe consider an open frame construction with a paneling cover. Even when using an open frame, a decent amount of strength can be built in.
I agree. When I had a TC, I added a shelf system in the area where the drop down bed was over the dinette. I used open frame construction, which kept the shelves quite light. It's not that hard to do open frame construction, but it takes a little more time.
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Wegocampin

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