EPDM Coatings
rvupgradestore.com Composet Products Custom Yacht Interiors

Author Topic: receptacles  (Read 1636 times)

John From Detroit

  • ---
  • Posts: 20355
  • ^My New Home^
    • Diabetics Forum
Re: receptacles
« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2017, 11:46:19 AM »
When you talk about "Licensed Eelectricians"

In another thread about a converter I ask the Original poster if he was sure he wired the 120 volt side properly.. You see. I once had Central Air installed in a house. and when we went to charge the system it popped uses fast as we could install them.

Alas the licensed electreciain had hooked the BLACK (hot) Wire to the GREEN (Ground) screw.


In many other threads some RVer with as 30 amp Rig hired a processional licensed electrician to wire up his TT-30 outlet.. WRONG and blew all the electronics in the RV.

Was loking for an electrical part. Stopped into an electrical supply....  An electrician there was about to wire a TT-30 Wrong.. Thankfully he found out the proper way FIRST. (From me).
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

malexander

  • ---
  • Posts: 444
Re: receptacles
« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2017, 08:18:05 PM »
I certainly enjoy reading the answers the self-proclaimed electricians give. It's usually pretty easy to tell what they've done in their life.
Most of the time, I just sit back and shake my head. :D
Marshall Alexander
2007 Fleetwood Bounder 38N DP, 2008 GL 1800 Goldwing, 2007 VTX 1300, Cessna 150 & 172, Rans S19 Venterra

SargeW

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 6674
  • Life is better on the road!
Re: receptacles
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2017, 08:53:30 PM »
My advice on this thread: LISTEN TO GARY!  Yes, I meant  to shout. You simply cannot compare RV wiring to residential wiring. A RV goes through a 2-8 hour long "earthquake" every time it moves. Houses on the other hand, rarely move. I I was born and raised in Ca for 50 years. We know how the ground moves in Ca. 

This is simply a matter of "thinking outside of the box".  RV manufactures have been using this technology for decades. Why? Because it works. Is there a better way? Maybe.  But for hundreds of thousands of RV's rolling around, this seems to be working pretty well.

If you want to upgrade your RV to steel boxes, receptacles, and housing codes, by all means go for it. If you are not that motivated, than don't lose sleep over it. Just take the RV out and enjoy the ride.
Marty--
2017 Tiffin Allegro Bus 40SP
Cummins ISL 450 HP/Powerglide chassis
Visit our new travel blog! http://www.mytripjournal.com/rvnchick2018
Support your local Police Officer, Fire Fighter and Military!

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3829
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: receptacles
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2017, 09:46:35 PM »
Marty, if you talk to the RV company bean counters, I bet you'd find that they use SCD's because they're lower cost overall than conventional residential boxes and devices. The time and labor savings alone is likely to be pretty substantial. That was the reason the manufactured housing (mobile home) folks used them right up until HUD changed the rules and they were required to meet standard residential building codes.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

malexander

  • ---
  • Posts: 444
Re: receptacles
« Reply #34 on: January 01, 2018, 06:49:52 AM »
Marty, if you talk to the RV company bean counters, I bet you'd find that they use SCD's because they're lower cost overall than conventional residential boxes and devices. The time and labor savings alone is likely to be pretty substantial. That was the reason the manufactured housing (mobile home) folks used them right up until HUD changed the rules and they were required to meet standard residential building codes.


I know for a fact Clayton Homes still uses them. I service/work on them. If I'm troubleshooting an electrical issue in one (of the homes), I change the recep out with a real box & recep, or switch, whichever the case may be.
Marshall Alexander
2007 Fleetwood Bounder 38N DP, 2008 GL 1800 Goldwing, 2007 VTX 1300, Cessna 150 & 172, Rans S19 Venterra

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3829
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: receptacles
« Reply #35 on: January 01, 2018, 08:11:18 AM »

I know for a fact Clayton Homes still uses them. I service/work on them. If I'm troubleshooting an electrical issue in one (of the homes), I change the recep out with a real box & recep, or switch, whichever the case may be.

That's interesting, Marshall. The newer units I've seen all had conventional residential wiring and devices. I was told it was required to meet the area building codes. I don't recall the manufacturers though.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 62296
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: receptacles
« Reply #36 on: January 01, 2018, 08:28:47 AM »
Quote
The newer units I've seen all had conventional residential wiring and devices. I was told it was required to meet the area building codes.

The manufactured [aka mobile] home national building codes have been substantially upgraded in the last 20 or so years, but I don't think that is part of it.  Besides,  SCD's are allowed in the NEC, which is incorporated in both the site and manufactured home codes as the residential electrical standard.  To the best of my knowledge, there is no difference in the national electrical codes for manufactured vs site built.  Or RVs, for that matter. However, some cities and most states put their own "English" on the national codes, so it's possible that change was required locally.  For example, Chicago has some unique electrical wrinkles, and South Florida has a higher wind resistance standard for both manufactured and site built homes.  If you are building for those markets, you have to meet the local code.

Most of the manufactured home code changes are for physical structure, primarily the roof, and energy efficiency (insulation, including thicker walls).  One of the side benefits of thicker exterior wall construction is that there is less motivation to use shallow outlets and that is one of the major benefits of SCDs.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 08:32:51 AM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Ken & Sheila

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 3668
  • Smokey 3
Re: receptacles
« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2018, 08:36:12 AM »
   However, some cities and most states put their own "English" on the national codes, so it's possible that change was required locally.  For example, Chicago has some unique electrical wrinkles, and South Florida has a higher wind resistance standard for both manufactured and site built homes. 

No SCDs in Chicago, but then there no Romex or plastic boxes. All metal conduit. This includes many of the suburbs that adopt Chicago's code.
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3829
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: receptacles
« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2018, 10:50:21 AM »
However, some cities and most states put their own "English" on the national codes, so it's possible that change was required locally.

When I got the permit to build our former mountaintop home years ago, the county code enforcement officer gave me a 100 or so page addendum to the NEC and state building codes. I don't recall if SCD's were mentioned, but at least 25 pages were related to NEC changes. All of the changes were more restrictive of course...
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

malexander

  • ---
  • Posts: 444
Re: receptacles
« Reply #39 on: January 01, 2018, 06:50:18 PM »
That's interesting, Marshall. The newer units I've seen all had conventional residential wiring and devices. I was told it was required to meet the area building codes. I don't recall the manufacturers though.


Clayton uses the SCDs, Solitaire and Fleetwood use "nail-up" boxes, Palm Harbor Homes uses the "old-work" cut-in boxes with real switches and receps. These are the ones I'm positive about. I just took a CEU for electrical contractor last month, I took my plumbing & mechanical contractor (master is some parts) in November.
Marshall Alexander
2007 Fleetwood Bounder 38N DP, 2008 GL 1800 Goldwing, 2007 VTX 1300, Cessna 150 & 172, Rans S19 Venterra

NY_Dutch

  • ---
  • Posts: 3829
  • Following the warm weather!
Re: receptacles
« Reply #40 on: January 01, 2018, 08:08:00 PM »
Thanks for the update, Marshall. If I was in the market for a manufactured home, one of the deal breakers would likely be SCD's.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

mellis

  • ---
  • Posts: 31
Re: receptacles
« Reply #41 on: January 08, 2018, 12:33:53 PM »
well i have done residential,,, commercial ,, and industrial,, but as we all know there is still more to see and learn all the time,,,  and yes i have never wired an RV,,,,  using a shallow box will not work with this device and  2 --12-2 wires in it ,,,  i think i will move on to  that device that they talked about that plugs into the recep that has the ports on it ,,,  the outer wall is to shallow to  put a full size box in there ,,,  so thanks for all the responces ,,,, done as of now  ,,,,

 

Hosted by Over The Network