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Author Topic: Rookie RV guy question.  (Read 1841 times)

Nomadjc

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Rookie RV guy question.
« on: February 24, 2018, 02:51:12 PM »
So, I've Been surfing around on this forum for the last couple of hours...trying to pick up some tips..And, i have to admit that I've learned a lot in the last couple of hours. 

My wife and I are in the process of buying our first class C motor home.  We've both camped off and on throughout our lives, but never as the proprietor of the venue.  I was sure there would be a list of necessities to bring along, but even looking and resources and library above did not see a list of stuff that you just can't live without...i mean there is the obvious pots and pans and RV friendly toilette paper not to mention camp chairs and BBQ grill.  Tools..cable TV cable for hookups...but...does anyone have the location or the time to provide a good comprehensive list of stuff that is absolutely necessary.  We're hunting and pecking around Amazon to just get some ideas, but that quickly gets overwhelming. 

How do I plan to camp?  Basically some weekend trips with the possibility of a couple of longer trips during the season.  We live in NJ and are contemplating going to Disney and staying there either later this year or early next year, but first, we want to christen our new rig with a few more local venues. 
Retired Army
Home base:  Central New Jersey
2017 Thor Chateau 31W Class C

Oldgator73

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2018, 04:04:31 PM »
My wife plans the meals in advance so shops accordingly. We normally keep the condiments in the trailer all the time along with coffee and filters. Popcorn too along with movies for the grandkids (they'll watch the same ones over and over) and books for us. I normally carry a tarp or two, tools (hammer, rubber mallet, channel locks, sidecutters, duct tape, bolt/amp meter, screw drivers, hatchet, axe and some kind of saw). Newspapers to help start a fire along with a big bottle of hand sanitizer, not only to sanitize hands but makes a good fire starter. Charcoal chimney. Shovel and leaf rake. Plastic bags. Gloves, both work and disposable. Beer and something to drink it out of since state and NP usually don't allow alcohol (I use a coffee cup). There's more but i would have to go to the driveway and check my trailer and it's raining.
Retired Air Force
2016 Winnie Drop
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HappyWanderer

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2018, 04:27:43 PM »
If you were to ask 10 people, you'd get 10 different lists.

When we first started out, we brought stuff from the house. Over time, we've acquired items that are used exclusively for the motorhome - dishes, cookware, small appliances, linen, etc.

The ongoing battle now is too much stuff! It's hard to go shopping without seeing something that would be great for the camper; we need to slow down and make sure it's something we really need and have room for. Occasionally, I'll pull everything out of the compartments and take a quick inventory. If I find things that we never use, they don't get put back.
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Larry N.

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2018, 05:09:36 PM »
You might go to our Library (above) and check out the "Newcomers need to know" section, which includes "Essential supplies for new RVers" and "Toolbox items" as well as a lot more. While Happy is right about "10 different people" these Library items can give you some ideas. Also, this has been discussed many times in the past, so if you do a search for "newcomers need" in the search box on the same line as the Library, not the "Search the entire forum" further up, then you'll get a lot of good info, too.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
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kdbgoat

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2018, 05:49:31 PM »
Everyone has their must have list, and they're all different. Start camping close to home, and make a list of things you must have and things nice to have. Make a run to Walmart to get stuff.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

2kGeorgieBoy

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2018, 06:35:46 PM »
Pack light, such as use paper plates instead of dishes, that type of thing. Try to get things that can "multitask". KEEP YOUR RECEIPTS!! You'll find that a lot of things you really thought you needed will never get used. On your first trips or actually on all trips, have a notebook that you can write down things you need to get and ideas of improvements or even repairs to do. Really think about things that you are considering buying...."Do we really need that? AND where will we store it?"

If you really want an introduction to RVing,  find and watch "The Long,Long Trailer" with Lucy and Desi. Also, be sure to watch RV with Robin Williams.
2000 Georgie Boy Maverick
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our toys:
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Gary, Jena, and Presley (our awesome yellow Lab).
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Stephen S.

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2018, 07:36:58 PM »
Notepad, pen or pencil.

Check a map or phone app for the nearest Walmart and Dollar General.

As you find yourself wanting something, write it down.

Do a shopping run when the list gets to half a page, or you need groceries.

--------------

If you try to get it all up front, you just end up with stuff you will never use taking up space in your cupboards.
Stephen S.
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'99 Winnebago Chalet
2002 VW Beetle
2018 Suzuki Burgman 400
Home town: Mableton, GA

Nomadjc

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2018, 07:42:35 PM »
Thank you all for your responses.  Oldgator, especially your response is helpful.  As you stated, wife is more the household side and i work on the automotive side.  I guess i need to make myself a decent camper toolbox.  The hatchet was something that I hadnít thought of or seen on other lists.  I can see where that would be helpful.

Also helpful, not to get everything up front as while the rig we bought has lots of storage, it is still VERY finite.  No need in having unneeded items. 

I did read the list in the library, and it was helpful, but just feels like some important stuff could be missing.  Having not been the camper owner, donít really know though. 
Retired Army
Home base:  Central New Jersey
2017 Thor Chateau 31W Class C

TrvlShell

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2018, 08:30:24 AM »
There was another post about this recently, and someone had responded with a few links to some sites/blogs that had "stuff to bring" checklists.  You might want to see if you can find the post.  I think it was just a few days ago or so, but it could have been in a different section (such as "General"), but I don't remember for sure.
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wincom6

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2018, 06:13:05 AM »
What to bring with you? This is an ongoing problem that you will never get ahead of.  Right now I'm a 1,000 miles from home and in need of a wood saw to do a temp fix to a  kitchen pullout counter.
U.S. Army Veteran
2008 Providence
2013 Chevy Equinox
Pittsburgh, PA
"Congressional term limits in my lifetime."

Oldgator73

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2018, 06:49:38 AM »
What to bring with you? This is an ongoing problem that you will never get ahead of.  Right now I'm a 1,000 miles from home and in need of a wood saw to do a temp fix to a  kitchen pullout counter.

There will always be that one off situation that you wished you had the tool to fix.
Retired Air Force
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2018, 07:28:16 AM »
I spent 8 years 24/7 in a Class C traveling.

Look for multi-use items and figure out WHERE you will store something before buying it. If you can't store it, then it's going to be in the way. Even if you plan to eat out all the time, plan room for some canned and boxed goods. You never know when you may get stuck and hungry.

If you plan to cook a lot, look for collapsible bowls and silicone items, they ride quietly and store easily.
My favorite cookware was chasing down the glass Visionware that works on stove top and in the microwave.

I found that Corelle dishes take up minimal room, ride quietly and are extremely difficult to break or chip, most of mine were bought 2nd hand so that I could end up with a nice assortment of sizes in plates and bowls without having to buy a set that came with stuff I didn't need.

Comfy mugs for hot liquids can also do double duty for cocktails, especially in camps that say no alcohol, pour it in your mug.

For the galley, I also assembled my own nesting pots and pans, colander, etc,  they don't seem to sell these as a set, but I was able to put together my own.

Silicone lids in assorted sizes are easy to store and ride quietly, you can toss out the noisy space hogging lids to the pots and pans. They also double duty as covers for other bowls or splatter shield in the microwave.

Figure out your garbage location! I found a space inside the cabinet to hold a round garbage can that can be fitted with  the endless supply of plastic shopping bags. I never had to buy garbage bags in 8 years and I hike to the dumpster in the camp daily or more to haul out the trash. If the park recycles, then I use a canvas shopping bag to hold those, then I have two things to carry, one is the recycles bag and other is the little trash bag. I didn't want to dedicate room for massive garbage, and the once or twice daily walk to the dump will do ya good.

Dirty clothes, most rigs don't offer up a space for these. I used a collapsible hamper that I kept in my shower stall. It was easy enough to remove it for showering, then put it back after the shower. I used a microfiber rag (or paper towel) to dry out the shower pan before storing it back in there.

Microfiber towels and cleaning cloths. These dry quickly.

As a female, I also enjoyed a jumbo towel sheet, the kind that you can wrap around your entire body from armpit to knee and tuck in. For public showers or coming out of your own shower, it does dual purpose as a temporary robe.

A big self draining patio mat, I used a 9x12 and learn to fold it properly in 3rds, then accordion style, so it will last years. If possible get one with a bag, easier to store. If you show up and your campsite is all dirt or sand or mud, the patio mat is awesome if you love the outdoors. Also on concrete it works well as then the camp chairs move easily. If you travel with a dog, mine loved the patio mat.

Since I was outdoors a lot, I traveled with a folding card table size, that folded in half again, this makes it easy to store and it was much more comfy to use than the picnic table. Since many camps came with a fire pit grill, I never traveled with a grill.

Don't buy identical outdoor chairs. Get 1-4 assorted different folding chairs if you love the outdoors.

I had a folding rocker, a folding lounge type chair with a high back, a folding directors chair, a collapsible chair that folded up tube length. It was nice to have the different choices of comfort. The zero gravity chairs take up a ton of room when folded up so think twice before buying that style.  The collapsible chair that folds up like a long tube with a baggy was handy to lug to the beach in my bicycle basket or to carry over if invited to visit somewhere like an outdoor  potluck. Instead of the space hogging zero gravity chair, consider a parachute style hammock. It takes up minuscule room when not in use and it's tons of fun when you are able to hang it up. I didn't travel with a frame, but my friend travels with a hammock frame that comes apart. I just used the adjustable tree straps and some rope. Some camps even came with hammock poles installed on the lot.

Take up bicycle riding, it's tons of fun and quite handy if you have a basket to carry things.

If your Class C has a ladder, then get the metal chair frame rack or 2 that hangs off the back ladder. I have used these to hold all sorts of things, especially when forced to pack up during the rain and stuff is soaking wet. Besides chairs, I've hauled leveling boards tied to them, a step ladder, a vertical bicycle and so on. Also travel with clothes pins and extra plastic coat hangers. You can hang up your towel or any wet clothes pinned to the clothes hanger then hang these off the chair rack hanging on the ladder in back. Triple duty item!

Convert to digital. I copied my CD's etc to MP3 files. I also had digital movies on a portable hard drive so if there was no TV reception and it was raining, I could watch a movie if I didn't feel like reading a book.

Many Class C's don't have shoe storage! In my case, I wear comfy Crocs for everything from hiking to biking to going out. A little soap and water makes them like new again. Try to figure out a multi-purpose shoe you can do everything in so you don't have a shoe storage problem. A compact waterproof windbreaker with hood is a must, takes up minimal room and keeps you dry when it rains.

Tools, I traveled with tools but I was fulltiming. For just camping, you need a small set, but only if you are handy. Things vibrate loose from driving and being able to put them back together is handy. I found that many repairs were from something working it's way loose.

I traveled with a Berkey water purifier, so that no matter where I camped, I had awesome tasting water for drinking and cooing. I never bought pre-packaged water. The Berkey takes up a lot less room than trying to pack away bottled water. Also the filters last years and are renewable with a bit of effort.

Everybody has their own ideas of what to take, these are just some ideas... based on my 8 years of Class C living.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

wackymac

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2018, 07:48:38 AM »
When we go on long trips (15 times across the U.S under our belt) the DW cooks stuff ahead of time i.e., soups, pork roast, etc., and portions them out in Ziploc bags and freezes them.  When we're on the road, it makes meals quick and easy in the microwave oven.  Plus, Walmarts are everywhere for needed purchases.
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2002 Toyota Tacoma Xtra Cab 2wd
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Rusty-11 year old red mackerel tabby with white, male, 24#,  leash trained.
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Oldgator73

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2018, 07:54:45 AM »
MissMermaid mentioned shoes. You will be amazed how many times you are in and out of the RV. She mentioned Crocs. Great idea, for all that are staying in your RV. Doesn't have to be Crocs but any slip on shoe that is easy to clean. If you wear shoes with laces you are less likely to take them off at the door, especially kids.
Retired Air Force
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier

jagnweiner

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2018, 08:18:29 AM »
Sounds like you've got a good plan already, camping locally at first to get a feel for things.  Just to give you an idea, though, I'll throw out the things we take with us.  Bear in mind that we have a Class A diesel with loads of storage underneath, so I don't have to be terribly selective.  Here's what comes to mind as I mentally walk around my RV and look in the compartments:

Outside storage (in no particular order):
-Tools:  I don't keep many tools in the RV all the time, other than a couple screwdrivers, crescent wrench, pliers and duct tape.  When we go on a trip, I just grab tools from my garage and stick them in.  Here's what I usually take:
--Basic tool box with box end wrenches, pliers, wire cutter/stripper, screwdrivers, vise grips, etc.
--Cordless drill with drill bit set and screw tips; I make sure it's fully charged and then don't bother taking the charger; no way I'm going to use it enough to run out of battery.
--Socket wrench set
--Hacksaw for PVC plumbing repair
--Multimeter
-An adequate number of folding lawn chairs
-Small charcoal grill and charcoal; I take "Matchlight" charcoal so I don't have to bother with lighter fluid, chimney, etc.
-Axe for splitting firewood into kindling
-Lighter for lighting charcoal or fire
-Extension cord
-Vinyl Tablecloth with clips to hold it to picnic table
-Small folding table
-Clothesline and clothespins
-Air compressor for adjusting air in tires (only on long trips); make sure tool box has a tire gauge
-Extra fuel filters and tools for changing, including a can of clean diesel fuel (it's a diesel thing, and you don't have to worry about it)

Inside:
-Plastic cups
-Coffee mugs
-Coffee maker
-Basic silverware
-Paper plates and plastic paper plate holders
-A couple plastic plates for warming things in the microwave
-A couple sharp knives for food prep
-Cutting board
-A couple small storage containers for leftovers; make sure they actually fit your fridge shelves
-Regular and slotted plastic serving spoons and spatulas
-Small colander for pasta
-Towels/dishcloths
-Dishsoap
-Dish drying mat
-Electric griddle for pancakes and bacon (often used outside)
-One frying pan and a pot or two
-Rubber drawer liner, both to line your drawers with and to stick between your pots and pans to keep from rattling while driving down the road
-Flashlights

Most of the things listed don't actually take up that much space.  I'm probably forgetting some things from the inside list, but that covers it pretty well.  If we're going somewhere with water, we also carry an inflatable kayak and associated gear (often used), as well as occasionally taking along fishing gear (rarely used).

Have fun and enjoy the journey!
-Scott
2000 Itasca Horizon 36LD

Nomadjc

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2018, 06:28:56 PM »
Wow Mermaid and Jagnweiner.  Those are some great tips.  I was able to extract a few things from each of your lists that hasnít been thought of by my wife and I.  With help from the forum users, we are slowly but surely coming up with our new list. We should be set when weíre ready to go.
Retired Army
Home base:  Central New Jersey
2017 Thor Chateau 31W Class C

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2018, 07:55:21 AM »
I would also buy things that "live" in the RV so when you are ready to go, there is less to pack and organize.

I had a friend who came to hate her RV because she refused to buy anything for it. After each trip she unloaded everything including the pots and dishes and canned goods, even the salt and pepper to store at home. Then when she went on a trip she spent days reloading the rig and forgetting things. She quit going on weekend trips because the work of loading and unloading was too much. Finally she sold the rig because it was too much work using her system which for some reason she refused to consider changing.

For instance, go ahead and duplicate your favorite toiletries and stash those in the RV including hair and tooth brushes. Stash your favorite spices and condiments.

I installed a horizontal compression post/rod and flanges close to the ceiling of my shower, measured to hold plastic clothes hangers without them banging into the walls. When I couldn't hang wet things outside to dry, I pinned them to the clothe hangers and hung them in the shower to air dry. On my first trip I went out hiking with the dog. About 2-3 miles from the rig, a sudden rain storm hit. We arrived back at the RV soaking wet. That is when I discovered the park had no laundry facilities to dry the dripping wet clothes and I had no where to hang them up. That hanging rod was a lifesaver for 8 years. I could even hang up my bath towel pinned to a hanger so it was dry out being folded up for the towel rack or storage.

If you plan to use the park facilities for showers etc., keep extra cloth shopping bags around so you can stash your toiletries, towel and clothes in the bag to go to and from the showers.

Stock up your toilet paper, dish soap, sponges, cleaning supplies and a stash of laundry soap.

Flashlights and portable lights. Many are made now that are rechargeable on USB. If your rig doesn't have USB ports install some in the 12 volt or 110 outlet.

I agree about shoe laces. I haven't worn any lace up shoes since I was a teenager. I love to slip off my shoes before going inside, or just inside the door.

A rubber broom with extension handle. Being able to shorten the handle for storage is handy.  Yes rubber.  I had to mail order mine because I couldn't find one in stores. Rubber brooms look funny, but they sweep carpet, vinyl, wet leaves, dry leaves, concrete, dirt etc. They work inside and out. It picks up human and pet hair. Mine has a brush and a squeegee. If you spill something you can corral it with the squeegee. The rubber broom cleans and washes up like new again.

Vacuum cleaner. Many rigs are built with carpet and no where to store the vacuum cleaner. While you may not plan to housekeep while vacationing, at some point you have to clean the rig to have fun. I traveled with a small powerful hand held HEPA filter vac with attachments. Giving the upholstery a good vac will add years to the life of it as well as the carpet.

I used a washable bath mat at my inside entrance. Easy to shake out daily and toss in wash as needed.

On a final note, pest control. You need a stash of mosquito repellent and wasp spray. You would be surprised how many times I opened up an electrical post to discover a wasp nest! Also a tiny bottle of Terro ant killer. About once a year ants invade the inside, and Terro will remove them in about 24 hours.

I also kept my rig stocked with passive pest control. I had rat and mouse poison stashed under drawers and in weird places. If either one got in my rig they would rip open the poison and die. I had a drawer under my fridge and I had pulled out the drawer and put some poision in a ziplock baggie under the drawer. More than once I found out my poision had been chewed open even though I never saw the rodent dead or alive.

In addition I had bug bait feeders hiding in weird places, so if a bug came inside, he ate the bait and died. I did this for 8 years and never had a bug problem but I did occasionally find a dead bug or a dying bug.

A fly swatter or two.

I guess you can tell I camped out in nature often and nature likes to come inside when you least expect it.

Buy some eternabond roof repair tape. if you tear open the roof through mishap you can patch it and get on with life. I happened to have some brand new roof tape when a big tree branch took a nose dive through my roof over the kitchen at 3 am. It only left a tiny funnel shaped hole, but it was raining inside my rig as a result!

At daybreak I was able to get help from rangers then scramble up there, clean the mess and attach the roof tape in layers, filling in the divot and then covering it all with a larger piece of tape. Then I called my insurance company to file a claim and told them I had mitigated damages to prevent further damage inside the RV. About an hour later another storm hit with horrific rains. I was so lucky to have the roof repaired in time. Not a drop came inside again.

At the time I was camping in a remote location on an island at a beach that takes a year to get a 2 week reservation and I was on day two. While the rangers offered to refund my money in view of the emergency, I was able to tape up the roof and stay the entire 2 weeks. The insurance adjuster drove all the way out there a few days later. He was amazed I was still happily camping, refusing to abandon my beloved spot.

For 8 years I kept a pad of paper and pen hanging on a clip on the wall so I could always find it. I would keep ongoing lists of shopping, repairs and wish list items.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

FunSteak

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2018, 08:38:35 AM »
Just a small addendum to DearMissMermaid's mention of a bath mat for the entryway.  We picked up 4 or 5 of these from Ikea: 
http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40211213/

They're really cheap at $8 each, and are invaluable to keep your floors clean, especially when it's wet/muddy outside.  We basically line the floor with them in front of kitchen area and also by the bed, in addition to one at the top of the entry stairs.  Keeps dirt off the floor, keeps feet warm and comfy, don't slide around (slightly tacky on the back) and are super easy to clean. 
JP & Karen
2017 Minnie Winnie 26a

jackiemac

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #18 on: February 27, 2018, 09:16:53 AM »
Just a small addendum to DearMissMermaid's mention of a bath mat for the entryway.  We picked up 4 or 5 of these from Ikea: 
http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40211213/

They're really cheap at $8 each, and are invaluable to keep your floors clean, especially when it's wet/muddy outside.  We basically line the floor with them in front of kitchen area and also by the bed, in addition to one at the top of the entry stairs.  Keeps dirt off the floor, keeps feet warm and comfy, don't slide around (slightly tacky on the back) and are super easy to clean.

Those are great, I have them in our house. When washed they come out of the machine almost dry!
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

2017 Heartland Sundance 288rls
2016 Dodge Ram 2500 6.4L Hemi

Travelling in US until 30th October 2018

martin2340

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2018, 12:01:16 PM »
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01JY9QAPQ/ref=asc_df_B01JY9QAPQ5386027/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B01JY9QAPQ&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167152358566&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7038091325071568300&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9007392&hvtargid=pla-312808058315
If you don't have a ladder this collapsible ladder weighs just 25lbs and extends 12.5'. It comes in very handy for cleaning off tree debris before packing to leave especially if you don't have slide toppers. I use it constantly throughout the season for checking my roof and general maintenance and waxing purposes.
Joe & Mari from Sanatoga PA
2010 F-150 Lariat 4X4 Heavy Duty Tow package(gone 7-17)
2017 F-250 Lariat 4X4 6.7 turbo diesel
2014 Sunset Trail 32rl
2002 Pearl White Road King Classic
Homebase: SE PA Sanatoga I can see the Limerick Power Plant from here

kportra

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2018, 01:12:38 PM »
One item I didn't see yet - a 5 gallon bucket.  We dump out dish water in it to save gray tank space, and then use it to douse the campfire in the evening.
2017 Heartland Prowler Lynx 18LX
2006 Dodge Ram 1500
Big Sky Country

kdbgoat

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2018, 01:27:26 PM »
Got my butt handed to me by folks on here for suggesting using gray water to put out campfire . ;) Just sayin'
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

Nomadjc

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2018, 05:55:15 AM »
Thanks again DearMissMermaid, again i was able to garner some great items for my new camper from your long list.  And Martin for the ladder suggestion, while my rig has a roof ladder built in, Probably not a terrible idea to have a handy ladder around such as the one you suggested. 
Retired Army
Home base:  Central New Jersey
2017 Thor Chateau 31W Class C

Oldgator73

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2018, 06:02:45 AM »
Got my butt handed to me by folks on here for suggesting using gray water to put out campfire . ;) Just sayin'

At least you didn't recycle your grey water back into your fresh water tank. People need to get a life. There's nothing wrong with draining grey water on the ground. Some people have their grey water drain into their flower and vegetable gardens at their stick and brick houses. And what do you think tent campers do with the water they wash dishes with? They throw it off into the bushes. That's where the best blackberries grow.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2018, 06:55:58 AM »
Quote
People need to get a life. There's nothing wrong with draining grey water on the ground. Some people have their grey water drain into their flower and vegetable gardens at their stick and brick houses. And what do you think tent campers do with the water they wash dishes with? They throw it off into the bushes. That's where the best blackberries grow.

AMEN!
Gary
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kdbgoat

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2018, 07:22:38 AM »
At least you didn't recycle your grey water back into your fresh water tank. People need to get a life. There's nothing wrong with draining grey water on the ground. Some people have their grey water drain into their flower and vegetable gardens at their stick and brick houses. And what do you think tent campers do with the water they wash dishes with? They throw it off into the bushes. That's where the best blackberries grow.

My washing machine waters that row of bushes on the east side of of my house.  ;) It is one of those next to worthless newer washing machines, so it doesn't use much water though.
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jagnweiner

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2018, 07:27:58 AM »
 But we digress . . . 
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Jim828

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2018, 08:17:45 AM »
I'll second the 5gal bucket. After I dump the grey and black tanks, I use the shower hose to fill the bucket and then dump in the toilet and the shower drain. This let's me know if I've put around 10 gallons in each tank for the ride home. As we know, the level monitors aren't real accurate. 10 gallons in each and some Dawn and the sloshing does a good job cleaning them.

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2018, 09:19:56 AM »
TO Nomadjc, THANK you for the kind words!  8)

Back to the lists...

I traveled with a 5 gallon bucket for awhile because it was gifted to me, but it was a pain in the tush to store away so I regifted it. In my case, it took up way too much room!

In it's place I bought a collapsible silicone rectangle dish tub. I carefully measured my sink before buying one, as they come in varying sizes and depths.

The one I chose didn't have a hole for hanging it up, and I planned to hang it collapsed in my shower between uses. So I drilled my own hole and that worked fine. I am a tree hugger, so yes, there were times when my gray water was carefully carried and donated to a nearby tree. Ditto for using it to douse a roaring fire before bedtime. Other times I used the collapsible dish tub to carry things around such as tidying up the outside before bedtime, I could use the opened dish pan to carry all my outdoor crap inside or to store in a basement locker and it was preloaded to take back outside in the morning. It was also handy to pop it open to use it for outside cleaning of the rig. It took up minimal space (collapsed) compared to a big 5 gallon bucket.

For instance after a ridiculous rain squall, my rig was left splattered with mud about 2-3 feet high all around it. Out came the dish pan and a rag, I had the outside tidied up and the mud removed rather quickly.

One item I found ridiculously useful was nite-ize wire ties. I had them in assorted sizes from 3-64 inches. I used them constantly for all manner of things. They are superior to bungee cords because they mold to whatever you need it for. Basically they work like a jumbo bread tie. They are metal flexible rods that  are covered in rubber or silicone and can be reused 1,000's of times. They are strong for tying up heavy things that will stay where you want them.

Here is link to look at what I am describing:
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=nite-ize+gear+tie&rh=i:aps,k:nite-ize+gear+tie&linkCode=ll2&tag=recreationalvehicles-20&linkId=56af6322f833888946fac750eeebcb82

For instance, I used one to keep the coffee carafe from leaving the coffee maker while bouncing down the road. Also I used one to attach the lid to the crock pot while cooking and driving.

If you like home cooked food, then you may want a crockpot. I often loaded up my crockpot in the morning before traveling. Then I placed it on a piece of rubber shelf liner in the sink, used a nite-ize wire tie to secure the lid to the handles. My crockpot was 200 watts, so I had a 250 watt inverter. One of those things that plugs into a cigarette outlet and has 110 sockets. Next I used a common extension cord to connect from the inverter to the crockpot.

As I drove down the highways and byways, my crockpot was riding in the kitchen sink, cooking up dinner. On the rare times (mostly in summer when it was 90 effing degrees) I would run the generator while driving and then I could just plug the crockpot into the regular outlet.

Which by the way, you may want to travel with an indoor and an outdoor electrical extension cords.

My outdoor extension cord was 50 feet long and heavy duty. Many electrical posts at RV camps have 110 hookups and so does the outside of my RV. Being able to run that long cord over to my picnic table or card table or where ever I wanted electricity was super handy. Matter of fact when camping I  would put my crockpot outside to cook so it wasn't hogging precious counter space inside. Even though sometimes I would be gone hiking or biking, no one ever stole my dinner. I tied the lid down too (with the nite-ize gear tie) to make it difficult for raccoons, but I think the heat from the pot scared them anyhow.

I had electrical adapters for my rig. For instance I was on 30 amp but I had a 30 to 50 amp adapter as occasionally I ended up in a hoity toity park that only had 50 amp service. When a manager would inquire do you need 30 amp or 50, I could say, either one will work for me! I also had a 30 amp adapter that stepped down to 110. One must be very frugal when using this but it comes in handy. I would visit friends that would offer to let me plug my rig in at their home, and the 50 foot cord plus the adapter, would typically allow me to reach their outside outlet. This is where it's worth the price to invest in a heavy duty outdoor extension cord.

Also I have camped in a park that only provided a 110 outlet and no water hookup, but thankfully I had my adapter so I had electricity inside, just had to be super careful how I used it.

Those nite-ize gear ties are terrific for keeping your cords or hoses coiled up when not in use. Also if I only needed 10 feet of the 50 foot outdoor cord, the gear tie could keep the other 40 feet out of the way. When I was hauling garbage on my bicycle that overflowed my basket, I used a gear tie to keep it from falling off the bicycle.

I had to pick up a huge mail-order package with my bicycle and I used a nite-ize gear tie to strap it to the bike and ride back to the RV.

Also, if you love the outdoors, then buy 3 yards of old fashioned oil cloth. Many parks provide a picnic table that is typically 6-8 feet long. That table top is also typically pretty worn or nasty or moldy. A table cloth will do wonders for it and make it enjoyable for use. I wasted loads of money on cheap vinyl table cloths that wore out quickly and were hard to clean between uses. Finally I bought oil cloth and that stuff lasts forever, cleans up on both sides like new and withstands the elements.

Because picnic tables come in varying thicknesses, I also traveled with some large spring loaded clamps. This keeps the table cloth from setting sail when the winds perk up. I had a bag of assorted spring loaded clamps and these were often pressed into service for all sorts of fun and foolishness.

I had company visiting one day who drove for hours to come visit arriving at high noon. We were sitting outside under the awning, but the strong sunshine was glaring and bothering them, they were on a drug that made their skin burn super easy yet he didn't want to go indoors. So I grabbed a flat bed sheet and some spring clamps, I was able to clamp the bed sheet to the awning to block the sun from burning him. It instantly made the area cooler too. When the wind perked up, I used clamps to hold the blowing end of the bed sheet to the picnic table and now we had an inverted V tent like effect. My friend was able to enjoy being outdoors without the bright sunshine bothering him.

So you might find a bag of spring loaded clamps in assorted sizes to come in super handy in enjoying camping even more.  ;D
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kportra

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Re: Rookie RV guy question.
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2018, 10:10:07 AM »
Thanks for sanity on the water in the campfire post.  I would think that most campers enjoy nature and take steps to reduce their impact anyway.  It's not like I'm taking a bunch of soapy or oily water and pouring it into a creek.  It's just the rinse water and we use enviro friendly products anyway.  I used to be a stickler for not using paper plates until I realized that I need kindling to get that fire going anyway - so double use.  It's called conservation when done correctly.

'nough said... :D
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