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Author Topic: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?  (Read 1167 times)

Northern Traveler

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Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« on: February 28, 2018, 01:18:33 AM »
My wife and I are new to this. Been looking around at used motorhomes. I found a 1989 Gulf Stream. 36000 miles, new roof and all new upholstery inside. Cupboards redone, new bed in the back and tires about 4 or 5 years old with about 500 miles on them. The generator has been recently serviced.Even the wallpaper is new. New batteries, all fluids have been change, tierod ends have been replaced and suspension gone through, has a all new blinds/curtains. It has a 460 Ford engine in it and is 36 feet long. I think I can get it for around 10000$ US. It has been stored indoors since the upgrades and roof were done. The roof interior work was done due to the previous owner incorrectly installing roof mounted solar panels. Also has upgraded sound system. We are looking to go on one long trip per year with it and otherwise use it at our seasonal camp site through the summer.

Should the age of this RV be a concern? I know you don't usually get much for 10000, but this doesn't look too bad.

Arch Hoagland

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2018, 01:36:06 AM »
Sounds like a deal to me. If it's in good shape and you like it go for it.

Assume you run into some problems and you have to put a couple thousand into repairs....so what. You got it for a pretty good price and anything much newer would set you back more than a couple grand.

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SeilerBird

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2018, 04:15:11 AM »
I am always suspicious when someone dumps thousands of dollars into an RV and then wants to sell it. Not logical to me.
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malexander

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2018, 04:24:30 AM »
I am always suspicious when someone dumps thousands of dollars into an RV and then wants to sell it. Not logical to me.


It happens with airplanes all the time, especially homebuilts. Life missions change.
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jackiemac

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2018, 05:21:52 AM »
I'm suspicious about the wallpaper, is it hiding water damage?  Just a thought.
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2018, 07:09:57 AM »
It certainly sounds nice, and well-loved besides.  That's a plus.  However, $10k is about all its worth no matter how well kept it may be.  The 1989 vintage was not a great time for vehicles of any sort and even less so for a medium-duty, gas-powered truck chassis.   There  will be definite mechanical drawbacks, e.g. mediocre engine performance, only a 3-speed transmission, horrible fuel economy (not that any Class A coach is good), and steering/suspension that was crappy even when new.  It's most suitable for short trips.
Gary
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Sun2Retire

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2018, 07:14:21 AM »
I'm suspicious about the wallpaper, is it hiding water damage?  Just a thought.


Ya, Id have to agree. Its fairly rare (I think) to find people putting wallpaper in RVs, usually theyre getting rid of it or painting it over. And the story about replacing the roof due to a bad solar install could be true, or it could be because the roof was leaking and rotted. I would pay a professional inspector to go over the rig very carefully, in particular looking for evidence of prior leaks.


This could be a nice unit that someone with good intentions put a lot of time and money in to, or a real headache. Just move slowly and get an inspection.
Scott
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DearMissMermaid

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2018, 07:17:24 AM »
I am always suspicious when someone dumps thousands of dollars into an RV and then wants to sell it. Not logical to me.

I don't think there is anything logical to owning/maintaining RV's (or sailboats!).  ;D

It seems to be pride of ownership. Some people want to maintain and upgrade their rig during their ownership, then when plans change, those upgrades etc. sell with the rig and one doesn't normally get their money back dollar for dollar.

I never knew when, how or why I would be selling my 94 Class C, but during my 8 years traveling in it, I kept repairing, maintaining  and upgrading it. For the time I had it, I seriously wanted to enjoy it and it was important to me to keep it well maintained with all systems working. Also I wanted it aesthetically appealing to my senses and lifestyle, so I probably spent money that others would have done without. For instance my rig came with a working functional kitchen faucet, but I hated it. At some point I had upgraded it to a beautiful faucet with extra options that was a joy to use and lovely to look at.  Someone else who rarely cooked may have seen this as wasted money in their eyes and never bothered to upgrade it.

Everyone has their own level of pride and ownership.

Recently I bought a 92 5th estate because I stumbled into a desperate deal on a rig that seriously appealed to me. Suddenly I was writing an advertisement to sell my 94 Class C.  As much as I wanted to keep her, I just couldn't justify trying to maintain two rigs and I wanted the cash to pour into my new love (the 5th wheel).

As I went through all my records and manuals to come up with an attractive list of equipment and enhancements, for the ad I was amazed at how much effort I had put into  maintaining and upgrading it. I wasn't just selling an old 94 rig, but I was selling a well maintained RV that had a lot of fun left in her for the next owner to enjoy. I decided NOT to focus on the year in the title of the advertisement.

I put "Reliable Class C in Excellent Condition" in hopes that lots of folks would at least go read my ad rather than skip over it because of the 94 year. Of course the ad disclosed the year, just that I chose not to include the year in the title of the ad.

In the past 8 years, I often joked about doing a $300 repair that will increase the final value by $20 but in my way of thinking, I got $280 of "fun time" in my rig by having things working right or upgraded options I enjoyed such as nice faucets or a heaven-on-earth bed.

Ironically when I finally put the ad up for sale, I warned myself that due to the fact it was a 94 with no slide outs, that it might take months and months to sell it. I was competing against much newer rigs, many with slideouts. I stuck my price way up high. It was not a sale of desperation, so I was prepared to wait it out. I could always lower the price, but it's hard to raise a price once the ad has published.

Incredibly, less than 36 hours after the ad went up, it sold to a new owner who was impressed with the overall condition.

I was amazed, as I had stripped out anything I could remove that could be used on the 5th wheel I had purchased yet all systems in the Class C were working when I sold it, save for one, the propane hot water had just recently died, but the electric hot water was working beautifully so I saw no need to repair the propane part just to sell the rig.

I was previously planning to replace the worn out flooring with new vinyl, but since I was now selling it, I simply cleaned the floor up then covered the rough spots with my throw rugs (which were spotlessly clean) same way I had been enjoying it. I figured the new owner could choose new carpet or vinyl to their liking or just leave it as is.

While making up the bed with sheets, quilt and pillows wasn't going to increase the sales price, it was going to show better to have a made up bed rather than a naked mattress.

There could be many reasons someone added new wallpaper to the rig (in the original post above) besides water damage. One being that glue can fail after a few decades or maybe there were holes or stains from dirt and grime. If wallpaper isn't periodically cleaned, then the dirt and grime can become permanent.

Perhaps the old wallpaper just wasn't aesthetically appealing. While moving out of my 94 rig, I removed all my wall baskets and many of my after market mirrors before selling my rig, so I had holes in the wallpaper but fortunately it was nice appealing original abstract paper that was still glued in place. Some holes I filled with bone colored calk that seemed to vanish into the abstract design and others I filled with matching screws which seemed to blend in as if the wall was simply screwed in place.

There was one small area of wall in the Class C  that was a problem to look at after I had removed some things, so I hung up a big working wall clock that came with my 5th wheel that I wouldn't miss as I didn't care for it anyhow. I carefully cleaned it up to look shiny new. Amazingly, the big wall clock looked beautiful as if it had always lived there. When the old battery died a day later, I replaced it with a new battery. It's hard to claim a rig is well maintained if one can't be bothered to pony up a new battery and reset the clock to the current time.  ::)

Another small area of wallpaper had a mysterious stain that just wouldn't budge. It had been there since I bought the rig and a wall basket I had removed had hid that weird stain for 8 years. I covered it up with an old used but working weather station that told time, temp, humidity, date etc.  The digital gadget looked impressive and it cleverly hid the small mysterious problem stain.

To the original poster... if the rig you are looking at appeals to you and seems to have a lot of bang for the buck, then go for it and enjoy!
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Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

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kdbgoat

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2018, 07:32:47 AM »
Didn't know you sold the Tioga. I figured you would still be using it for travel to and from your new homebase. Better change your sig. :)
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Northern Traveler

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2018, 11:24:16 AM »
So it turns out the current owner worked for a large coach building firm in the past. That is why he tackled the roof and interior. Kind of reliving his younger years I guess. As far as I can tell this will be the biggest bang for my buck. I have a relative going to look at it in a couple days. If all is well I will make an offer on it. I have no problem doing work on this thing, bottom line is that it's read to go and not a project. As for actuall road time I will be luck if I put on 4000 miles on in a year, so I am not too worried about not so efficient powertrain. I really can't see this unit deprecating much more in value, especially here in Canada. I am not afraid to walk away but I think I will give this old unit some real good consideration. Thanks everyone for your input. I do appreciate it. I will keep you guys updated!

jackiemac

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2018, 12:31:14 PM »
So it turns out the current owner worked for a large coach building firm in the past. That is why he tackled the roof and interior. Kind of reliving his younger years I guess. As far as I can tell this will be the biggest bang for my buck. I have a relative going to look at it in a couple days. If all is well I will make an offer on it. I have no problem doing work on this thing, bottom line is that it's read to go and not a project. As for actuall road time I will be luck if I put on 4000 miles on in a year, so I am not too worried about not so efficient powertrain. I really can't see this unit deprecating much more in value, especially here in Canada. I am not afraid to walk away but I think I will give this old unit some real good consideration. Thanks everyone for your input. I do appreciate it. I will keep you guys updated!
Sounds more promising, good luck, hope it works out! It will be fantastic getting out there in it.
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

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Charlie 5320

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2018, 09:35:35 PM »
Run Forrest RUN away from it. Power to weight ratio on those old coachs were terrible. You would be lucky to get 4 or 5 mpg with A carbed engine and a 3 speed trans. Mid 90s coachs were night and day superior, and shouldn't cost that much more. Don't settle for just any coach or you will be looking again in a short time.

Tires are more than half way aged out before you get started.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 09:37:42 PM by Charlie 5320 »
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Northern Traveler

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2018, 04:54:14 PM »
Run Forrest RUN away from it. Power to weight ratio on those old coachs were terrible. You would be lucky to get 4 or 5 mpg with A carbed engine and a 3 speed trans. Mid 90s coachs were night and day superior, and shouldn't cost that much more. Don't settle for just any coach or you will be looking again in a short time.

Tires are more than half way aged out before you get started.

Really? That bad? This one is actually fuel injected, only throttle  body injection though. I thought it might be hard on fuel only being a three speed. Was just going to put up with it for my one trip per year. No you are giving me second thoughts.

Molaker

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2018, 06:06:00 PM »
Really? That bad? This one is actually fuel injected, only throttle  body injection though. I thought it might be hard on fuel only being a three speed. Was just going to put up with it for my one trip per year. No you are giving me second thoughts.
At one trip a year, I would rent one instead of buying.

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DearMissMermaid

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2018, 07:09:35 PM »
The original poster said:

We are looking to go on one long trip per year with it and otherwise use it at our seasonal camp site through the summer.


The cost of renting an RV isn't cheap, certainly not a bargain. Many come with such bare bones you still have to load up a ton of stuff to make your vacation and the RV usable.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

Old_Crow

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2018, 06:07:51 AM »
First, let me say, I'm a restorer of old things.  I had a shop restoring old cars and trucks.  I restored and hot rodded old cars and trucks as a hobby, and I also restored and rode old motorcycles.
The first Class A I bought was an '89 Sportscoach.  It had 10k miles on it and was 23 years old when I bought it(for $5k).  In the 5 years I owned it, we drove it over 12000 miles(including our first 11 months of full timing).  Doesn't sound like a lot until you consider it'd been driven less than that in the previous 23 years.  The coach had been really well maintained by the owner's son.  Had new shocks, belts, hoses, tires and filters.  The only mechanical thing I ever did to it was oil changes and grease jobs.
Not to say there weren't problems.  I had to go through the furnace and clean and tighten all the blade type electrical connections to get the furnace to be dependable.  I upgraded the headlights, the shower head and the stereo and that's about it.  The insurance put a new roof on it after a branch fell on it in a storm, and a couple of years later, it was hooked up to my shop which was struck by lightning.  That  took out the roof air and the fridge...which Progressive happily replaced for me.
After living full time in it for almost a year, we decided to upgrade to something with a slide.  I sold it in one day...for $2500 more than I paid for it.
All that to say, don't be scared off of a good deal by all these guys that wouldn't keep a coach over 5 years on a bet.  If you like it, and it's in as good shape as you say, you can't really get hurt for that money.  Look it over real good and then pull the trigger if you still like it. 
Lots of us out here on a shoestring, and we're having the same fun and the guys in the Prevosts.
Wally Crow
Retired 30 year ASE Master Auto Tech
Y2K Bounder 36S F53
'03 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2018, 09:49:26 AM »
Solid advice from Old Crow, but you have to be willing to work with (and on) older stuff and keep your expectations in line with the limitations of 1989 RV tech.

Throttle body is a big improvement over a carb and I diodn't realize that the motorhome version of the Ford 460 had that in 1989. That's good news.  Is the chassis a Ford F53 or a John Deer with a Ford engine?  I had a '96 460 (with Banks package) that ran and powered decently, but the E4OD transmission was woefully inadequate except at cruising speed in top gear. That tranny pretty much lived in 2nd gear otherwise!  The E4OD came out in 1989, but I think an '89 F53 chassis is more likely to have the predecessor Ford C6 3-speed transmission. That would be a significant difference in my mind.

Most first time motorhome buyers are disappointed (should I say appalled?) at the acceleration, braking and handling of a motorhome, even the newer models.  Older ones were notably poorer than those built since around 1999, so those feelings get exacerbated the older you go.  The chassis available in the late 80's thru mid 90's were undersized for RVs much over 30 feet and 15,000 lbs of gross weight. Wheels and brakes were small (typically 16" wheels), chassis rigidity lacking, the engines relatively weak, and the car-type transmissions were largely inadequate. Did people own and drive them? Sure - I had had one myself and so did many others. But compared to any  car of the last 20 years, or any more recent motorhome, they ride and handle poorly.
Gary
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Summers: Black Mountain, NC
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Northern Traveler

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2018, 10:16:12 AM »
keep the great advice coming! I really appreciate it. This unit is on a John Deer chassis, and actually has a large slide out and even a new king size residential mattress. I wouldn't expect a slide out on anything this old. (Special order?) I kind of think it actually might be a 1990 model, not that it matters much. I have someone going to look at it tomorrow, it's a 13 hour drive away from me. I can make a decision from there. I will keep you guys posted. Thanks again you are all helpful and awesome!

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2018, 02:48:05 AM »

Lots of us out here on a shoestring, and we're having the same fun as the guys in the Prevosts.

So true!
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2018, 03:39:53 AM »
keep the great advice coming! I really appreciate it. This unit is on a John Deer chassis, and actually has a large slide out and even a new king size residential mattress. I wouldn't expect a slide out on anything this old. (Special order?) I kind of think it actually might be a 1990 model, not that it matters much. I have someone going to look at it tomorrow, it's a 13 hour drive away from me. I can make a decision from there. I will keep you guys posted. Thanks again you are all helpful and awesome!

WHOA!

Have you seen this rig in person yourself?

I surely don't recommend buying sight unseen!  :o

About a year or so ago, I was helping a friend (who refuses to do internet)  shop for a used small RV. Then they relocated to their summer home, 1500 miles away. I continued to shop for them and found a rig near their summer home on Craigslist that looked great in the pics and seemed like a decent bargain. When they went to look at it, turns out the pics were much nicer than the rig's condition when they viewed it in person, and the final sales price was just way too high given the condition. that was evident in person but not reflected in the pics. The pictures just didn't show glaring problems that were evident in person.

Amazingly I found another RV that just had their name written all over it, and I pushed them once again to at least go look because it seemed to me that the rig would move quickly with the options and price advertised.  I told them hey, it could be worse than the pics, but might be better, it's hard to tell without looking in person.

The price on this one was a bit more and I had told them they maybe they needed to consider a bit more money, in view of the desired options and condition they were willing to accept even though they were handy and expecting to do some work on whatever they finally purchased. I knew my friend for well over 25 years and was very familiar with their unique lifestyle, which is why I thought the rig I had found would would be perfect for them, their purpose and planned use for the rig.

Well, this time he went to look and turns out the RV looked far nicer than the crummy pictures. The pictures supplied in the ad just didn't do the rig justice.

As a few problems were discovered, the seller worked hard to rectify some of them and volunteered to lower the sales price in view of others. My friend loved the layout and overall condition, then made a great deal with them and called me to say, you were right, the layout, size and options were perfect for me and the final price paid was a bargain.

But he bought it AFTER seeing it in person.

On a flip note, years ago, a friend (one of my former sailing students) excitedly called me because they had found the perfect sailboat and was going to buy it sight unseen because he  found dealing with the owner by phone to be a breeze. I urged him NOT to buy it until he could see it in person.

I was living aboard my own sailboat in the Caribbean (one I had rebuilt to like new condition) and I taught beginner sailing for those that were interested in pursuing the possibility of sailing and living aboard. I also caught rain water and used a solar panel to power my lack of utility bills. Given that wind, rain and sunshine is free and the islands at that time offered up beautiful anchorages that weren't over run with pricey marinas, it was an attractive lifestyle for those wishing to travel without having the heavy fuel, water and marina expense if they learned how to live efficiently and of course knew how to sail. In those days fresh water was frightening expensive and not even available to boats in many pristine idyllic beach anchorages. (In years to come, that type of frugal lifestyle became nearly impossible as anchorages were over built with marinas and a pricey mooring ball system.)

Somehow over the phone the owner convinced him to wire the money, sight unseen. When he finally went to pick up the sailboat, it was serious buyer's remorse. While it was a beautiful sailboat, it was a sleek racing boat and what my friend wanted was a roomier live-aboard cruising sailboat. The race boat just didn't have the room and comforts for his large frame. It was designed for speed, not for day to day living. When he tried to resell it, he took a serious beating as sadly in his enthusiasm of chasing the dream, sight unseen, he had grossly overpaid for the purchase. It also took him over a year of constantly reducing the price, until it finally sold.

So don't let your dream get in the way of common sense.

You really need to see the RV in person for yourself before buying it.

http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2018, 08:56:08 AM »
I checked the NADA RV Guide and cannot find any indication that Gulfstream built any motorhome with slides in 1989 or 1990. Nor were slides a "special order" option at the time. Heck, trailers were just beginning to use slides and Gulfstream trailers didn't have them either. The first reference to a slide in a Gulfstream coach is in 1996.  I'm wondering if that slide is an aftermarket modification - there were a few companies doing that for awhile in the early 2000's.

If $10k is your budget, this sounds like it is as good as you are likely to find.  However, MissMermaid gave sage advice: go look at it and drive it, then make up your mind.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 09:01:22 AM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
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johnaye

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2018, 01:42:03 PM »
I checked the NADA RV Guide and cannot find any indication that Gulfstream built any motorhome with slides in 1989 or 1990. Nor were slides a "special order" option at the time. Heck, trailers were just beginning to use slides and Gulfstream trailers didn't have them either. The first reference to a slide in a Gulfstream coach is in 1996.  I'm wondering if that slide is an aftermarket modification - there were a few companies doing that for awhile in the early 2000's.

If $10k is your budget, this sounds like it is as good as you are likely to find.  However, MissMermaid gave sage advice: go look at it and drive it, then make up your mind.


A couple of years ago I found a DP on Craig's List that sounded like a great deal.  I asked for pictures and a bunch were sent.  However, I think the pictures were from different motorhomes.  When I asked to see it the seller got pushey and wanted me to "escrow" the money with ebay.  Long story short, it was a scam.  Look before you buy.  Start the engine and work all the systems. 

Stay safe.
John and Becky
2004 Alfa See Ya DP
2008 Honda CRV

Experience comes from mistakes.  I have a lot of experience

Northern Traveler

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2018, 05:13:33 PM »
Thanks again everyone. It's pretty tough to deal on anything living in a remote location like I do. That is why I am having someone look it over for me. This is a relative who is more knowledgeable than I am when it comes to RVs. Looks like he will be going next weekend to look as poor weather has effected both his  and the seller's travel plans. . I won't be sending any money, there are tons of scams out there. I am still on the fence about owning something this old. Just going to have to wait and see how this plays out. I have no problem walking away from this deal, as Camping season does not start until the 3rd week of May up here and we still own our old pull behind trailer.

DearMissMermaid

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2018, 06:41:27 AM »
There are companies that add after market slide outs. I so loved my Class C that had no slide outs that I checked into adding a big one.

The biggest problem for me at the time, was traveling to their factory, then moving out of the rig for 3 weeks with a dog while they completed the work. The motels in the area had hefty surcharges for a dog in tow plus trying to find one with a kitchenette. I was also factoring in the bang for the buck because  once I did that, I was committing myself to living in the Class C several more years to justify the costs. I was also going to lose some storage area and because of my numerous big windows, I was tight on storage as it was.

I still would NOT buy sight unseen.  While someone else may find the rig usable, it's different when you finally walk inside, sit down, lay down and test out the layout and feel for it.

Seems like you would do better to take your existing trailer on a vacation near where lots of rigs are up for sale. then you can look over a lot of different situations.

While searching for my new used rig recently, I discovered one guy was sending me pics from a different rig, even a year newer,  but claiming his rig "was just like the pics'. I couldn't get him to go take inside pics of the rig he was selling! I began to wonder if he really had title to sell the rig he was advertising since he couldn't be bothered with taking inside pics. Also when I asked about the stuff scattered outside, did it come with the rig and so on, it did not  yet he claimed his family had formerly lived in the RV while building a house. So why was this stuff scattered all around the outside of the rig but didn't come with it? It looked very lived in from the outside so maybe those pics were old too?

At some point he claimed the rig was sold and the ad vanished. I don't know if he was a scammer or if someone finally showed up to look it over and actually bought it. He seemed unable to answer any of my questions about it so I couldn't figure out how he and his family had lived in it for 6 months and knew nothing about it.

Then again, I recently met a lady in my current RV park who bought a 5th wheel, moved into it, then a few months later, bought a park model and now she is selling the 5th wheel. She tells me she knows nothing about the 5th wheel either. Her ad is one of those two sentence types. Not sure how she plans to sell a rig for $10,000 with only two sentences in the ad, but I do see this kind of foolishness often.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

kdbgoat

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Re: Old but refurbished. Should I pull the trigger?
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2018, 06:52:59 AM »
It's amazing how people can mess up in the details. I have an acquaintance that has a Georgie Boy motorhome. He bought for next to nothing and has refurbished to suit them. (knew what he was getting into from the start, this wasn't his first rodeo.) When he tells someone what kind of motorhome they have it's a Georgiaboy. That's how he spells it on paper too.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

 

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