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Author Topic: New to RVing. Might be permanent  (Read 2298 times)

zeeter

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New to RVing. Might be permanent
« on: February 28, 2018, 11:33:37 AM »
In my industry it is appearing that I will likely be moving from place to place every year or so as a consultant. Thus, rather than getting an apartment every year I've been thinking of getting a travel trailer or a 5th wheel.

What I've read thus far in my research:
5th wheels are more expensive
5th wheels are easier to tow
5th wheels can be larger since five or six feet extend over the bed of the truck
Travel trailers are lighter and thus better on gas (though some say the ease of towing a 5W makes up for this)
Travel trailers are more susceptible to crosswinds
Travel trailers are less expensive

Obviously I am leaning towards a 5th wheel. They look sturdier and appear to provide ample living space as compared to a TT. I'll be living in this full time and don't want to be more cramped than necessary.

I had a million questions I wanted to ask, but am finding the information has already been asked. I have a Chevy Colorado, so that is not going to pull a 5W, but it may pull a properly weighted TT. May have to upgrade to a 2500 as I'm reading that even a 1500 may not be powerful enough.

Anyway, what should I be looking out for that I haven't thought of yet? I have experience towing a boat. Not to say the two are equal; just that I'm not a novice to towing.

Tom

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2018, 11:38:38 AM »
Welcome to The RV Forum. Glad to hear you're finding answers to some of your questions. A fifthwheel sounds like a good option for you, given the long stays between moves and the fact that you'll be fulltiming. As you've found, the truck need to be capable of towing the fifthwheel, and our towing experts can help with that choice.
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

donn

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2018, 01:24:39 PM »
TTs tend to be oriented more to weekenders.  There is absolutely nothing you will be happy with that you could tow with your Colorado.  1500s and 2500s are really limited also.  So plan upgrading to a 3500SRW at minimum.  Duallies are far better for towing large fivers.  A fifth wheel drops approx 20% of its total weight directly over the rear axle.  Thus the need for more truck.  Fivers can be as,light as a similar sized TT, so whoever told you that fivers suffer fuel economy is simply uninformed.  My Cummins powered dually pulling my 13,500 pound fiver returns a constant 10.5-11.5 MPG towing.  My brother had a Ford Ecoboost pulling a 17 foot Jayco thay did not get that good.  A properly matched combination will return decentmfuel economy. 
Personally I think you really need to go to some dealers and look.  Look past the glitz and glitter and play house in ones you like for a half hour or so.  Pretend your using the toilet, take a shower, make a meal, how about the bed and closet space.  You will learn really fast what works and does not work for you.  Once you have your wants nailed down, then you can consider a tow vehicle.

Larry N.

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2018, 01:57:24 PM »
Quote
My Cummins powered dually pulling my 13,500 pound fiver returns a constant 10.5-11.5 MPG towing.  My brother had a Ford Ecoboost pulling a 17 foot Jayco thay did not get that good.

You're comparing diesel (Cummins dually) with a gas-burner (Ecoboost) -- apples and oranges -- so of course the diesel does better, even with extra weight and drag.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

donn

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2018, 02:58:46 PM »
You're comparing diesel (Cummins dually) with a gas-burner (Ecoboost) -- apples and oranges -- so of course the diesel does better, even with extra weight and drag.

Actually not quite true.  If that were even remotely correct my same truck should be getting 30MPG empty, hile my brothers Ford would only get 20.  Weight and wind resistance are directly related to fuel economy.  I tow probably three times as much weight as he does.  Diesels have way more low end grunt, in other words way more pulling power.  For a full timet the OP really needs to figure out what he wants, then decide on enough truck so he does not need to rebuy it in a couple years when he decides on a bigger trailer.

ArdraF

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2018, 03:23:25 PM »
I wonder what type of weather Zeeter will encounter when he moves from job site to job site.  Assuming there will be a lot of variation he needs to be very careful about getting enough insulation for decent heating and cooling.  Most trailers, whether TT or 5er, are not intended for fulltime living and, thus, are inadequate for extreme weather variations.  Some will be better than others.  There are people who have talked on the RV Forum about living year round in places like the Dakotas (cold at below zero temperatures) and the southwestern deserts (hot at 115 degrees).  He should peruse some of those posts to see what he's dealing with, perhaps even before going shopping.

ArdraF
ArdraF
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zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2018, 04:22:43 PM »
Are we saying a 2500 might not be enough? Remember that I'm only going point to point; not traveling around constantly. That is, I'm in Maryland, so if I get a job in New Mexico then I'm driving it to New Mexico and leaving it there. Then in a year maybe I move it up to Denver. Then San Francisco. Etc...

I also need the TV to be reasonably fuel efficient for driving to work and back. With a truck I don't expect to get good mileage, but logic tells me the 3500 will be significantly heavier and use up more fuel. It might be better MPG than the 2500 when towing because the engine doesn't have to work as hard, but when not towing is what I'm thinking about.

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2018, 04:30:19 PM »
Actually not quite true.  If that were even remotely correct my same truck should be getting 30MPG empty, hile my brothers Ford would only get 20.  Weight and wind resistance are directly related to fuel economy.  I tow probably three times as much weight as he does.  Diesels have way more low end grunt, in other words way more pulling power.  For a full timet the OP really needs to figure out what he wants, then decide on enough truck so he does not need to rebuy it in a couple years when he decides on a bigger trailer.

Ok I re-read this. Remember that I'm not going to be a full timer in the sense of full-time RVing. I'm going to set up someplace for a year and stay there. That much I've done the research on. Jobs in NM and Denver have RV parks that offer monthly fees and allow you to stay for extended periods. I assume I'll need to move it periodically to dump sewage or whatnot, but outside of that it is staying on site.

BTW, NM parks are about half the price of the Denver area parks.

donn

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2018, 04:46:38 PM »
Whether you move it twice or every week you need a vehicle with sufficient capacity to safely tow it.  A 3500 will get exactly the same fuel economy as a 2500 with the same drive train.  The difference is load carrying capacity.  You really need to go shopping and see what you find that you think you can be comfortable in.  Believe me there is no RV made that will survive with you warm at zero degrees.  Like I said TTs tend to be more weekend rigs.  Some, very few fifth wheels are suitable as full time rigs. Fewer still will have somewhat adequate insulation.  And those will be very heavy.  Thus demanding a heavy duty truck.  Many of the full time fivers with decent insulation will requore a 3500 dually at a minimum. 
As an alternative, allbeit bothersome alternative is buy a small car and hire someone to move it for you.  Of course that is going to cost you around $1.50 a mile at current rates plus fuel surcharges.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 04:48:50 PM by donn »

Larry N.

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2018, 06:54:40 PM »

Quote
Remember that I'm not going to be a full timer in the sense of full-time RVing.

Just so you understand the common terms, a full timer is one who lives full time in an RV -- it doesn't have to mean a lot of travel. Many sit still for months at a time. A few don't move it for years, but they're still RVers, in the sense that they live in it full time. Enough of my quibbling, but donn's points about insulation/cold weather are very well taken -- Denver certainly gets occasional very cold weather (I've seen -25 F for almost two weeks, a couple of times, though that's not common). And even New Mexico especially northern NM, gets quite cold at times, too. I was stuck (with my motorhome) in Elephant Butte, NM for a couple of days one year, waiting for the roads to reopen (closed from blizzards). One night it was down to -4 F, and the next was down to -6 F.

So frozen water lines and a cold living space will sometimes be a problem for you, even there.

And back to towing: Maryland to Albuquerque is close to 2,000 miles, so at donn's quoted price for hiring the tow that would be about $3,000. Albuquerque to Denver is about 450 miles, or about $675. So it would definitely be cheaper for you to hire a tow and buy a small car or SUV (or even keep your Chevy Colorado) than to buy a sufficiently capable truck and use it for your day-to-day vehicle too.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

Arch Hoagland

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2018, 03:00:07 AM »
I'd like to suggest renting an RV for a week or so if you've never used one.

Then start going to RV shows and dealers every chance you get. Walk through about 100 RV's and you will get a feel for what you like and DON'T like.

Remember you can't have your cake and eat it too. Buy a diesel truck and be confident you can pull whatever RV you purchase regardless of fuel mileage.

I get 7 mpg, you'll do a lot better.   
2004 Monaco La Palma 36 DBD
W22, 8.1 gas,  Allison 1000 Transmission
7.1 MPG over 90,000 miles

2000 Lexus RX300, 4020lb
U.S. Gear Braking System

OutdoorFT

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2018, 04:23:00 AM »
Welcome.
Seems liek you got a bunch of good answers. I get about 10-11 mpg with my F350 6.2L gas engine. Not bad for half city, half highway...or a monster truck.
Future Fulltimer

2011 F350 Lariat CCLB SRW
No RV yet!!

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2018, 07:56:25 AM »
Based on responses here, I think I'll get a small used travel trailer instead and see how I manage. Something like a 16-18 footer. One that I can tow with the Colorado. It's likely that I'll get it out there wherever I'm going to be rather than hauling it across the country.

If I manage ok I'll go ahead and make the investment into a larger truck and probably a 5th wheel with more amenities.

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2018, 09:44:11 AM »
Just so you understand the common terms, a full timer is one who lives full time in an RV -- it doesn't have to mean a lot of travel. Many sit still for months at a time. A few don't move it for years, but they're still RVers, in the sense that they live in it full time. Enough of my quibbling, but donn's points about insulation/cold weather are very well taken -- Denver certainly gets occasional very cold weather (I've seen -25 F for almost two weeks, a couple of times, though that's not common). And even New Mexico especially northern NM, gets quite cold at times, too. I was stuck (with my motorhome) in Elephant Butte, NM for a couple of days one year, waiting for the roads to reopen (closed from blizzards). One night it was down to -4 F, and the next was down to -6 F.


The context of what I was saying was that I would not be towing the RV on a regular basis. You're right - I will be full time RVing. I just wanted to put it into perspective that I'm not sure I need a huge truck for moving the RV once or twice a year. Yes, ideally a 3500 would be better, but they run $60K. Even a used with <60K miles costs around $40K. If I can manage with a 2500 then I'd rather do that. If the 3500 is more of a convenience than a necessity then the 2500 is the way to go.

donn

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2018, 09:54:03 AM »
3500 is more necessity than anything else.  Would you  rebuild a motor with only a screwdriver and a pair of plyers?  Certainally not.  You would have the tools necessary to do the job.  Same for towing.  You need the proper tool for the job.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2018, 10:03:02 AM »
The truck needs to be highly capable, and that means more than just engine power.   Especially for a 5W, which places a lot of weight on the truck suspension, typically 20-25% of the loaded trailer weight. The truck needs to be able to carry that weight as well as pulling the trailer. A travel trailer puts a lighter cargo load on the truck, around 10-12% of the loaded trailer weight.  You also want a relatively firm suspension on the truck, and most half ton and mid-size trucks are equipped with a car-like suspension because they mostly get sold to people who use them in lieu of a car.

You need to go look at a lot of trailers and figure out how much living space & amenities you need. Few people find a 16-18 ft trailer acceptable for more than a long weekend, but wants & needs vary widely. For full time living quarters, most people require a comfortable bed, plenty of bedroom storage for clothing and enough space to dress, make the bed, etc.  Equally important is a decent size toilet area & shower. Then comes an adequate galley with a decent size fridge, a comfortable recliner or sofa (your preference), maybe a good sized tv if tv is part of your life, etc. Also, do you do laundry at home now, or use laundromats (DIY or full-service)?   Smaller trailers, whether TT or 5W, rarely provide much of those facilities.

Once you have narrowed down the size trailer you will need for comfortable living, you can determine how much truck is needed. It will probably be a 2500 or 3500, but if your wants & needs are modest you might get by with an F150/1500 that is suitably equipped for towing.
Gary
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Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2018, 11:08:08 AM »
Which is why I'm going to get something lighter to start out with before putting out for the expense of a 5W and a 2500 or 3500.

jackiemac

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2018, 11:33:23 AM »
Hi and welcome to the forum.  Note that it is possible to rent travel trailers in some areas anx this mighg be a worthwhile exercise for you.

We have a TT and live in it for 6 months while we travel. I doubt i would want to be in it somewhere very cold. I have been in a few fifth wheels and they are more roomy but I'm unsure about their  performance in the cold, although lots of folk use them even in colder climates so some must be good (as are some trailers).

Good luck on your search and come back and let us know how you get on.
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

2017 Heartland Sundance 288rls
2016 Dodge Ram 2500 6.4L Hemi

Travelling in US until 30th October 2018

ArdraF

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2018, 06:17:22 PM »
Regarding places you will park this RV, most campgrounds and/or RV parks have at least some full hookup sites which means you'll have electricity (30 amp, 50 amp, or both), water, and sewer.  Sewer is important for long-term stays so you don't have to move all the time just to dump your tanks.  Sometimes CATV is included if it's a woodsy or remote location where either satellite TV or over-the-air TV is not available.  Some places we commonly call trailer parks also might work if they have sites for transient RVers (some do and some don't, you have to ask).

I think you're beginning to experience what many new-to-RVing people experience - sticker shock.  A lot of people think RVing is cheap, but it's not.  As you're learning, it's not just the cost of the RV but also finding a tow vehicle that is adequate for the task or tasks.  Once you actually get the rig and start living in it there will be other costs such as propane for heating in the winter or electricity for cooling in the summer.  Both can be costly and more than a new RVer expects.  The people who have been commenting on your posts are trying to help you avoid costly mistakes because we've seen a lot of them here.  In addition to RV shows and reading lots of ads, peruse a lot of topics hear having to do with meeting your needs, such as cold/hot weather camping.  Good luck in finding what fits your needs!

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Lou Schneider

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2018, 07:27:12 PM »
If you're only going to be moving once a year or so, consider hiring a commercial transporter to move the trailer from job to job.  There are several companies that move new RVs from the factories to dealers all around the country and most of the time their drivers will welcome a second load before deadheading back to the factory.

Google RV transporters to get an idea of what's available.

This would avoid the cost of buying a large truck for a once a year move and having to drive it around all of the time.

DearMissMermaid

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2018, 08:02:08 PM »
I second that emotion...  ::)

If you are only moving it once a year or so on a job, then forget towing it and hire a mover. They are surprisingly affordable.

Craigslist is full of licensed insured one and then there is U-ship where dozens will bid to have your business. Rates are reasonable. I just went through all this moving my 5th wheel because I found out my bicycle wasn't going to be much help moving it.  :o

So you could easily buy a used 5th wheel and pay to have it moved to where you want to live and work. If the campground offers extended stays then there is a 99% chance they will have full hookups which means you won't be moving it to dump the tanks. You can settle in and relax after work. Some RV parks will give you a hefty discount if you can pay for 6 or 12 months at once. Most do not advertise this at all, so be sure to ask about an annual rate.

Even though I used a mover to relocate my 5th wheel I still bought collision, comprehensive and road side service on my rig. The roadside service was only $16 for the year, and basically that meant if the tire went flat or blew, I could have a truck come out and change it on their nickle not mine.

Start used, cause they are far cheaper than new and you can learn your way around.

Visit loads of used dealers and check out some craigslist ads, the more rigs you see, the more you get a feel for what appeals to you and what doesn't. Get a floorplan that suits your lifestyle. Imagine what you will be doing in it. If the weather is somewhat nice where you will be you can use some of that basement storage for outside chairs etc. I spend loads of time outside. Some even come with outside TV's or hookups for one. Typically they hide behind a basement door.

Since you will be living in it, you may want one with extra features such as a washer/dryer. If it doesn't come with an electric heater fireplace, you might be able to add one, freestanding or built-in. The prior owner of mine had built in a fireplace heater into a corner cabinet that was just storage. It's fun ambiance for sure as I can run it with or without the heat option. Matter of fact mine heats the entire RV until it drops below 40F, give or take,  then I need to supplement with propane furnace, but not for long.

The benefit being you will have electric heat as well as the propane furnace they typically come with. Some 5th wheels come with two AC units, so if it's super hot, you can turn on the spare.

Oddly enough my 1992 5th wheel came with an 18 inch dishwasher as an original option. So I feel very spoiled as people keep saying "What? You have a dishwasher too?"

Good luck and maybe think about the transporter/mover as an option and just keep enjoying your current vehicle.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

WILDEBILL308

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2018, 09:19:40 PM »
Are we saying a 2500 might not be enough? Remember that I'm only going point to point; not traveling around constantly. That is, I'm in Maryland, so if I get a job in New Mexico then I'm driving it to New Mexico and leaving it there. Then in a year maybe I move it up to Denver. Then San Francisco. Etc...

I also need the TV to be reasonably fuel efficient for driving to work and back. With a truck I don't expect to get good mileage, but logic tells me the 3500 will be significantly heavier and use up more fuel. It might be better MPG than the 2500 when towing because the engine doesn't have to work as hard, but when not towing is what I'm thinking about.
Heare is a thought if you are only gong to move once a year or less just pay to have it moved.

Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2018, 07:26:17 AM »
You know what's kind of been bugging me? All of the RVs I've looked at have dishwashers. I'd think that of all the necessary features in an RV, a dishwasher would be the least of my worries since it is literally right next to the sink. I'd much rather have a small oven. If I wanted something that was going to take up a ton of water and power it would be a washer/dryer combo.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2018, 08:48:01 AM »
Quote
You know what's kind of been bugging me? All of the RVs I've looked at have dishwashers.


Hard to say without knowing what you have been looking at.  Larger, luxury-class rigs often include dishwashers, but they surely are not common in travel trailers or even the majority of 5W's. And from what I see, any rig that has a dishwasher also has a washer/dryer.

Most newer RVs have a convection/microwave rather than a gas oven. RV gas ovens are small and notorious for poor heat control and uneven baking.

** I just looked thru a variety of Forest River travel trailer models and did not see a single dishwasher, even optional. Both gas ovens and convection-microwave ovens were common, though.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/TravelTrailers.aspx
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2018, 09:21:58 AM »


Hard to say without knowing what you have been looking at.  Larger, luxury-class rigs often include dishwashers, but they surely are not common in travel trailers or even the majority of 5W's. And from what I see, any rig that has a dishwasher also has a washer/dryer.

Most newer RVs have a convection/microwave rather than a gas oven. RV gas ovens are small and notorious for poor heat control and uneven baking.

** I just looked thru a variety of Forest River travel trailer models and did not see a single dishwasher, even optional. Both gas ovens and convection-microwave ovens were common, though.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/TravelTrailers.aspx

Annoyingly, now that I'm looking specifically for one with a DW I can't find one. They were on almost every trailer/5W I looked at yesterday.

DearMissMermaid

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2018, 04:15:35 AM »
My dishwasher is not a full size household type, it's only 18 inches wide. It happens to be water efficient. I wasn't looking for a dishwasher either, but I must admit, since I love to cook from scratch and sometimes entertain friends, I often do amass a pile of bowls, dishes, pans and utensils in quick order. It has been oodles of fun to let the dishwasher do the grunt work for me.

I haven't owned a dishwasher in 31 years, so this was kind of funny and newfangled to me.

I could see a drawer type dishwasher being a bit more space friendly and efficient on an RV. Mine is the 2 rack type but it's 18 inches across.

I use the dishwasher to load up other things beside dishes for a thorough super hot cleaning. I also use the "cool" option for drying, to be thrifty with energy use.

Ironically in 1992 this 5th wheel came standard with a big ice maker or the option for the dishwasher rather than the big ice maker (in the same spot). So the original bill of sale from 92 which came with the rig, shows the dishwasher was the chosen option. Me personally thinks an icemaker is a waste of space. I can and do make ice in trays, them dump them in a storage bin in the freezer for future use. That takes up minimal room compared to the big ice maker that the kitchen was designed to accommodate.

About that gas oven. I love mine and use it often, especially when it's chilly outside, as the extra heat from baking is a welcome addition inside, in spite of having to use the exhaust fan. BUT... I use mine with the addition of an oven thermometer. That way I can adjust the dial to the correct temperature I desire.

While a microwave oven with a convection built in is handy indeed, I like having my gas oven too. I often use the microwave for steaming fresh veggies because they come out with beautiful color and more nutrients intact. Something else can be baking in the oven while steaming in the microwave (in my way of thinking).

Back to the gas oven...
It seems engineering overlooked calibrating  the oven dial correctly.  :o
So buy an oven thermometer and enjoy baking! It will help you "re calibrate" the oven knob.

Also, for some strange reason, in my 1994 Class C, the oven was assembled wrong and didn't work right, matter of fact it was a virgin, having never been used. When I first used it the results were dismal, then I realized it was assembled wrong!

Once I assembled it correctly, it worked fine. I wonder how many stoves were sent out with the oven put together wrong?  :-\

However, Magic Chef, has a huge broiler in the bottom and a small oven at the top. Had they made the broiler a lot smaller (in height) the broiler would still be functional (and quicker) and the oven would be larger. I can say that because years ago, I installed an RV stove on my sailboat and it had the smaller broiler and larger oven, so large that I could fit a small turkey in it whole. The shorter broiler worked fine and was very quick. I could make toast in under a minute, but in my Magic Chef, making toast is a pain in the tush and takes a long time so I gave up on toast. The oven actually works better at making toast, but it takes as long as the broiler does.

Maybe Magic Chef thought we needed that huge tall broiler for steaks that are 4 inches thick???  ::)

At some point an engineer (or factory?) decided to make the broiler larger and the oven smaller. This confounds me and seems nonsensical.

In the 1992 5th wheel I just bought, the oven came with a light! I was so excited until I couldn't get it to work. When Gary sent me a link to go buy and try a 12 volt bulb instead of a 110 bulb... TAH DAH!

Thanks Gary, the 12 volt bulb works and I now have a working oven light!

So, that begs to wonder... WHY did Magic Chef drop the oven light option?

It's heaven on earth now to turn on the light and look/check  the item baking then quickly close the door and keep the heat inside, not outside. Before I was trying to use a flashlight, but having the bulb builtin, is much nicer.

« Last Edit: March 03, 2018, 04:30:57 AM by DearMissMermaid »
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a 1992 Holiday Rambler Imperial 36' 5th Estate, formerly 8 years 24/7 in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

Old_Crow

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #26 on: March 03, 2018, 09:37:49 AM »
You know on a lot of ovens, you can remove the knob and use the set screw behind it to calibrate the oven temp, right?  I learned that right here on rvforum.
Wally Crow
Retired 30 year ASE Master Auto Tech
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johnaye

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2018, 01:32:34 PM »
Have you considered another option.  Buy a motorhome and tow a car.
John and Becky
2004 Alfa See Ya DP
2008 Honda CRV

Experience comes from mistakes.  I have a lot of experience

RedandSilver

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2018, 02:24:28 PM »
Have you considered another option.  Buy a motorhome and tow a car.

You beat me to the punch as I was going to suggest the same thing.

A used Class A DP will could/will be the same amount as a new truck and a 5th wheel.
And if you have a vehicle to tow now all you would have to do is buy 1 used Class A instead of 2 vehicles.

But what ever you do don't buy a 16-18ft TT to try it out unless you like wasting money as you will be upgrading that in short order.
Full timing for a year at a time will require some storage space which will be very little in a TT of almost any size IMO.

But you came here for advice so I would suggest you at least look into the suggestions posted here.  If you decide against them fine.
If you never look into them you may miss the perfect unit for you - buy one and be done vs. many units over time.

Good luck with what ever you decide on and PLEASE report back when you do get something so other can learn from you too.
2002 Rexhall Rose Air  Cummins 8.3  350hp
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Larry N.

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #29 on: March 03, 2018, 05:03:02 PM »
Have you considered another option.  Buy a motorhome and tow a car.

I don't think you really want a motorhome to sit for a year without being moved. A 5th wheel is a much better choice for this application.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

jackiemac

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #30 on: March 04, 2018, 12:16:51 PM »
Annoyingly, now that I'm looking specifically for one with a DW I can't find one. They were on almost every trailer/5W I looked at yesterday.
For a minute there I thought they were selling them  with a free wife 🤣
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steveblonde

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #31 on: March 04, 2018, 09:42:17 PM »
I don't think you really want a motorhome to sit for a year without being moved. A 5th wheel is a much better choice for this application.

Biggest issue in this case is now you have 2 chassis, engines etc , but the op is also looking at larger units with dishwashers so the Canyon has to go and a new or newer 3500 is in order, a few priorities need to be made first
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WILDEBILL308

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2018, 09:29:57 AM »
For a minute there I thought they were selling them  with a free wife 🤣
Please, free wife, Like any major purchase it isn't the initial cost it is the maintence that will hurt you.
Some are much better than others. ;) ;D
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

johnaye

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #33 on: March 06, 2018, 06:51:54 PM »
I don't think you really want a motorhome to sit for a year without being moved. A 5th wheel is a much better choice for this application.
We are full time in a DP and I am still working.  We will be taking three trips this year, including the one to get the annual service done.  Every month we run the engine at a high idle for 30 minutes and run the generator with a load for 15 minutes.  No problem so far.
John and Becky
2004 Alfa See Ya DP
2008 Honda CRV

Experience comes from mistakes.  I have a lot of experience

Larry N.

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #34 on: March 06, 2018, 08:28:40 PM »
We are full time in a DP and I am still working.  We will be taking three trips this year, including the one to get the annual service done.  Every month we run the engine at a high idle for 30 minutes and run the generator with a load for 15 minutes.  No problem so far.

My comment was a relative to the recommendation of a motorhome for the OP, not a reference to what you do.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

DearMissMermaid

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #35 on: March 07, 2018, 05:11:29 AM »
You know on a lot of ovens, you can remove the knob and use the set screw behind it to calibrate the oven temp, right?  I learned that right here on rvforum.

Do you have a pic of that? I removed my Magic Chef oven knob and I don't see a set screw.

There is a tiny nut in the 7pm position.

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Old_Crow

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  • Former Phantom Fixer
Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #36 on: March 07, 2018, 06:58:47 PM »
I tried taking a pic, but it wouldn't come out well enough to see anything.  The screw is about an inch down inside the shaft after you remove the knob.  There might be a blob of silicone or something blocking the view of it.  All you'll see is a slot for a tiny common screwdriver.
Wally Crow
Retired 30 year ASE Master Auto Tech
Y2K Bounder 36S F53
'03 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #37 on: March 08, 2018, 05:50:59 PM »
Biggest issue in this case is now you have 2 chassis, engines etc , but the op is also looking at larger units with dishwashers so the Canyon has to go and a new or newer 3500 is in order, a few priorities need to be made first

I'm not looking for a dishwasher. I just noticed that a lot of them appeared to have them. Though now that I've said that I can't find one, so maybe my eyes were playing tricks on me.

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2018, 05:51:36 PM »
For a minute there I thought they were selling them  with a free wife 🤣

That would certainly incentivize my purchase for me :)

zeeter

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2018, 05:55:16 PM »
Again, though, it's looking like if I do anything it is going to be small. If I hate it then it won't cost as much to get out of it. Plus I'd lose a lot on my Colorado if I had to trade it in. More than I'd lose reselling the small RV.

currinh

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2018, 09:39:55 PM »
Based on responses here, I think I'll get a small used travel trailer instead and see how I manage. Something like a 16-18 footer. One that I can tow with the Colorado. It's likely that I'll get it out there wherever I'm going to be rather than hauling it across the country.

If I manage ok I'll go ahead and make the investment into a larger truck and probably a 5th wheel with more amenities.

Reading though the responses you've received, I'm certainly out of step with the majority. I think getting a small trailer is a reasonable option. Assuming you're traveling alone it is certainly doable. 16-18 may be a little small but again doable. I've seen may construction workers moving around for jobs with "smaller" trailers, most with "larger" pickups. I've lived long term is two smaller trailers, 3 years in an old 22'? Airstream and 7 years an old 24' Traveleze. Worked well when I was single. My wife and I are now spending the winter in Arizona, with two large dogs, in a 19' Escape trailer. This is a personal decision, no one can tell you if you'd be happy or not in a "small" trailer. You may not know yourself till you've done it. But a trial with a small trailer would tell you if using an RV is feasible, as well as guide you to the best size for you.

If you are moving around for jobs, and spending a year each location, cold weather may be a challenge. I've spent several years in marginally cold weather (lows around zero). If this is your case I'd suggest a few things. Skirting helps a lot with cold weather, it prevents cold air from blowing and circulating under the RV. What you can do is determined by the RV/trailer park you're in. Some require metal siding. Hay bales would work but I suspect frowned upon, and rodents. I've seen vinyl fabric snap on skirting useful if moving frequently. Skirting will also help keep tanks from freezing, but can still be a problem. Some minimal heat underneath would prevent damage.I set up my long term cold weather trailers as park models, no holding or fresh water tank.  Also, you can put heat-tape on thefresh water and sewer hose. This all depends on the weather you encounter.

If I were moving that often for jobs, I would consider an RV. Much more comfortable than setting up an apartment that frequently. I also think, easier to arrange for RV sites than dealing with apartment leases. So I think you're on the right path.

There is a great deal of knowledge on this forum. Most here have BIG rigs. Listen to them and learn, but don't take their suggestions as defacto fact for you. And please keep us updated with what you end up doing.

Thanks.

Hugh
Hugh
Klamath Falls, OR
2011 Escape '19
2018 RAM 2500 diesel
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WILDEBILL308

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #41 on: March 09, 2018, 11:00:13 AM »
We are full time in a DP and I am still working.  We will be taking three trips this year, including the one to get the annual service done.  Every month we run the engine at a high idle for 30 minutes and run the generator with a load for 15 minutes.  No problem so far.

A much better practice would be to take it out for a drive for about 50 miles every month. This will warm up the transmission and all the seals. You riley don't get it warm enough just idling. Driving also helps the tires as it works the compound to bring more anti aging compounds to the surface.
I would run the generator for at least an hour. When shutting it down let it idle with out load to cool it down before shutting it off. 15 min is not riley enough to warm the windings to drive out excess moisture. Did you know Onan now recommends 2 hours exercise each month. ;)
Bill 
 
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Utclmjmpr

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Re: New to RVing. Might be permanent
« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2018, 04:17:16 PM »
 You are also killing the turbo by idling unnecessarily,,it will coke up and destroy the center turbine bearing.>>>Dan
« Last Edit: March 22, 2018, 04:19:50 PM by Utclmjmpr »
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