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Author Topic: Camping in hell  (Read 2200 times)

SeilerBird

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #30 on: May 22, 2018, 02:14:14 AM »
ever thought about going somewhere its not 100 degrees colorado is pretty nice in july..
My thoughts exactly. Go to Yellowstone or Glacier NP.
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John From Detroit

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #31 on: May 22, 2018, 08:23:44 AM »
You said it never got ABOVE 90, I think you meant BELOW

But that said. Many air conditioners need to be cleaned, and by that I mean up on the roof, Remove oouter and on non-coleman units INNER covers (on cannon just the outer) and clean the condenser coils.  they get rather well logged so air can not pass through them.

And that may well fix it.

Watch for icing on the evaporator (Cold) coils as well. though this will reduce air flow if it happens. and happen it does

Clean any filters

Then use a thermometer in the out flow.. Start withthe room at least in the high 70's. turn to HIGH FAN and take a reading. Now turn to HIGH cool and take a reading or readings (if the temp drops keep reading till it bottoms out) and post the results.

I have twin 1500's one coleman one Advent air with a coleman fan (Makes it easier to clean, see above) and this blanged house is often 90+ even when it's much cooler out.
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gravesdiesel

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #32 on: May 22, 2018, 09:24:47 AM »
I've had seven RVs. Why?  Because the previous RVs lacked something we wanted or needed. It takes a while to get the RV you want.

So your next RV purchase, I guess within two years, will have two powerful working air conditioners. That will always be the first thing you look at when buying another RV. Oh and make sure the slideouts have covers. Very important for cooling purposes.

Now if you were a real woman you'd sit your sweety down and explain to him why you aren't going to cook this July. Be firm.....
Absolutely!  My current one has one 15,000 btu unit but my next one (a 35 foot fifth wheel toy hauler) will have one 15,000 and two 13,500 btu units.  I HATE being hot when relaxing or sleeping.
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Sunnedays

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #33 on: May 23, 2018, 07:50:13 PM »
I've had seven RVs. Why?  Because the previous RVs lacked something we wanted or needed. It takes a while to get the RV you want.

So your next RV purchase, I guess within two years, will have two powerful working air conditioners. That will always be the first thing you look at when buying another RV. Oh and make sure the slideouts have covers. Very important for cooling purposes.

Now if you were a real woman you'd sit your sweety down and explain to him why you aren't going to cook this July. Be firm.....

Holy smokes....7 RV's?!  Well, I suppose they're always putting something neat on the new ones - got to get us to buy them somehow.  We did discuss it some more; he's pretty stubborn so it took his HVAC buddy's advice to ring his bell.  Arg!  Some men are just too macho for their own good! 
It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak up and remove all doubt.

- Abraham Lincoln

Sunnedays

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #34 on: May 23, 2018, 07:54:57 PM »
From many years of camping in warm places with only one air conditioner it is my hard held opinion that one is just not enough.  I remember laying in a pool of sweat and trying unsuccessfully to get to sleep after a long day of off roading.

Yeah, I thought I wasn't effected by the cold until I spent a year in Natick and Framingham MA one January.

Oh my goodness, it's brutal!  I used to think I could handle anything, definitely not a complainer but wow, having an a/c - expecting it to work to keep my body from meltdown - and then sitting in a 90 degree tin-can - for anything more than 30 minutes was unbearable. 

As far as the cold, I'm not a huge fan of the super cold but I feel like it's more feasible than extreme heat...now I'm sure since I've said that, the hubs is going to want to take a trip someplace frigid just to test out my theory...
It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak up and remove all doubt.

- Abraham Lincoln

Sunnedays

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #35 on: May 23, 2018, 07:59:22 PM »
ever thought about going somewhere its not 100 degrees colorado is pretty nice in july..

Ha, I LIVE in Colorado.  Never need the a/c where we go and we live in the Foothills so never have to deal with the city heat BUT we also have a boat and the waters of Lake Powell are amazing: clear blue, clean - the rock formations are a sight to behold (and so is the HEAT).  Holy cow.  Can you believe the first time we went, 2 years ago, we TENT CAMPED.   :o Neverrrrrr again.
It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak up and remove all doubt.

- Abraham Lincoln

Sunnedays

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #36 on: May 23, 2018, 08:06:25 PM »
You said it never got ABOVE 90, I think you meant BELOW

But that said. Many air conditioners need to be cleaned, and by that I mean up on the roof, Remove oouter and on non-coleman units INNER covers (on cannon just the outer) and clean the condenser coils.  they get rather well logged so air can not pass through them.

And that may well fix it.

Watch for icing on the evaporator (Cold) coils as well. though this will reduce air flow if it happens. and happen it does

Clean any filters

Then use a thermometer in the out flow.. Start withthe room at least in the high 70's. turn to HIGH FAN and take a reading. Now turn to HIGH cool and take a reading or readings (if the temp drops keep reading till it bottoms out) and post the results.

I have twin 1500's one coleman one Advent air with a coleman fan (Makes it easier to clean, see above) and this blanged house is often 90+ even when it's much cooler out.

I did??!!  Well, I definitely meant below...I must have residual heat stroke too.  Ha. 

I've been so busy with work that I haven't made it to check it's cleanliness and/or test the temperature per the instructions all of you great guys have given me - but I will have time tomorrow after work and I'll be over there to get it done.  I'll post what I get, for sure.

We're definitely getting a portable a/c, and I've already worked out how I'm going to fit it in one of the small windows in the back, a black one to match the interior of our toy hauler AND after reading some other forum posts, I've decided to get some of that reflective foil bubble stuff and cut it nicely to fit my windows, I think instead of sticking velcro everywhere and ruining the walls, I'll get some of those 3M no-damage sticky things that you can put the hooks on, then I'll use elastic bands on the bubble stuff to hook them onto.  Did that make sense?  I'm bound and determined to beat the heat this time... 8)
It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak up and remove all doubt.

- Abraham Lincoln

Sunnedays

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #37 on: May 23, 2018, 08:07:54 PM »
Absolutely!  My current one has one 15,000 btu unit but my next one (a 35 foot fifth wheel toy hauler) will have one 15,000 and two 13,500 btu units.  I HATE being hot when relaxing or sleeping.

I don't think it's even possible to imagine relaxing or sleeping when it's 90 degrees inside  :( :o
It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak up and remove all doubt.

- Abraham Lincoln

Boonieman

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #38 on: May 23, 2018, 09:24:22 PM »
 FYI, for what itís worth I usually bring an extension cord when I think Iím gonna use the portable AC. Most campsite power pedestals have a separate 120 receptacle on them. I just run the cord to the AC from the pedestal. ( heavy duty extension cord) Maybe not necessary, but it does keep you from tripping a breaker on a circuit in your RV, depending on how your power load on receptacles inside the camper are configured.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2018, 09:26:21 PM by Boonieman »
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jims94vmx

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2018, 06:57:47 AM »
Also turn ac on early in the day.

Graycat

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2018, 10:36:09 AM »
ever thought about going somewhere its not 100 degrees colorado is pretty nice in july..

X2

Or you could go to Colorado and let Hubs take the kids and dogs to the lake.  Kudos to you for lasting the whole week last year.  I would have been outta there after the first hot night.
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Lynx0849

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2018, 12:32:50 PM »
My current toy hauler is a 14í vee nose utility trailer fit up with lights and shore power.
We pull out the bikes and set up a queen air bed. Plan is to get a real one in a couple of years.

We bought a 8k btu portable at lowes and made an output exaust fitting of clear plexi cut to fit in the opening of a sliding window. Used foam to seal it. It completly saved our vacation one summer. It ran the whole time.

Your idea of putting it in the garage is good. Keep the door open and put a fan in the doorway to stir up the air in the whole rig. I personally would not use lots of fans as each has a motor that gets hot when running.
The two units may make the difference.

Brokeass Boater

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2018, 11:35:45 PM »
Seems like a lot of cubic feet of air to turn over for one unit. Plus every time a door is opened add that recovery to the equation.  My houseboat that I had many years was 43', the cabin was around 27'x 12'. It had a single A/C unit over the salon. On the 100+ deg. days here in the delta, the only place that was cool was the salon. The bedroom at the stern didn't really get much cool air. But we had the option of jumping in the water to cool off. If its not enjoyable and something that is going to be every year, maybe think about adding a second A/C unit,,,gregg
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Foto-n-T

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #43 on: May 26, 2018, 07:50:59 AM »
There is one thing that you can do that will help, it won't solve the problem totally but it does help, park with your slides facing northeast.  When my wife was alive we'd spend a week in Lake Havasu in September and the temps were still well into the double digits.  The first time we did this our slides were pointed southwest and took full sunshine in the afternoon.  After a couple of days of getting baked I requested a different spot and basically turned the rig 180į only putting sun on the slides in the morning and it made a BIG difference.  Slides are not insulated like the rest of the unit with basically no floor or ceiling insulation.
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Stephen S.

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2018, 08:25:58 PM »
In addition to the bubble insulation on the windows, put some in the roof vents. Those let in a lot of heat too.

Basically insulating like you were going to camp in the winter. Insulation works both ways.

Something I've always wondered about was using pvc pipe and tarps to put an "umbrella" over the RV. An extra layer that the sunlight hits, and has airflow under it to reduce the total heat on the roof.
Stephen S.
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meternerd

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #45 on: June 07, 2018, 09:41:31 PM »
A previous post mentioned cold air vents open near the unit return air intakes.  If you do that, it will basically just recirculate the cold air back into the intake and the rest of the trailer will get no cool air at all.  Try closing off the cold air ducts near the unit's return air ducts so that the hot air from the rest of the trailer will be pulled through the cooling unit.  If you have 120 volts available, the portable AC units with a hose for the hot air exhaust will do a pretty good job of cooling....but, you have to have the electrical capacity to run 'em.  Otherwise, you'll just keep tripping breakers.  One other "trick" is to set up a sprinkler near the outside roof-top unit so that the evaporator will be cooled by water in addition to the ambient air.  It doesn't take much water to make a big difference.  Not sure if the park would object, though.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 09:46:04 PM by meternerd »

NY_Dutch

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Re: Camping in hell
« Reply #46 on: June 07, 2018, 10:10:13 PM »
A previous post mentioned cold air vents open near the unit return air intakes.  If you do that, it will basically just recirculate the cold air back into the intake and the rest of the trailer will get no cool air at all.  Try closing off the cold air ducts near the unit's return air ducts so that the hot air from the rest of the trailer will be pulled through the cooling unit.  If you have 120 volts available, the portable AC units with a hose for the hot air exhaust will do a pretty good job of cooling....but, you have to have the electrical capacity to run 'em.  Otherwise, you'll just keep tripping breakers.  One other "trick" is to set up a sprinkler near the outside roof-top unit so that the evaporator will be cooled by water in addition to the ambient air.  It doesn't take much water to make a big difference.  Not sure if the park would object, though.

Some A/C installations have a "rapid cool" register installed in the ceiling unit that's smaller than the air return register next to it. The air velocity from the smaller outlet is high enough that the larger return vent does not have enough suction to create a "short cycle" circulation pattern.
Dutch
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