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Author Topic: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains  (Read 3776 times)

Walkingplow

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Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« on: June 18, 2007, 09:10:02 PM »
Anyone interested in visiting Banff National Park and surrounding area should check out www.rocky-mountain-tour-guide.com

rvfan001

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2007, 08:59:50 AM »
A friend was recently in the Calgary area and recommened Banff to me.

I am looking to head that way so thank you soooo much for the link above.  :)
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2007, 12:13:53 PM »
If you  have never been to Jasper & Banff, start making plans now. The scenery and the wildlife are incomparable. Just remember that Jasper/Banff is Canada's equivalent of Yellowstone - everybody flocks there in the summer and it will be crowded. If possible, visit before or after school is out.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Torchbearer

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2007, 04:50:39 PM »
My wife and I are headed to Banff at the end of February.  We are going to Lake Louise.  We will not be rving but we will be driving.  I was wondering what type of weather conditions I will be facing.  I am a southern boy and have very little experience on ice.  Will this trip be to dangerous to attempt?

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2007, 10:44:51 PM »
Quote
I am a southern boy and have very little experience on ice.
Are you kidding? You are going to freeze your [name a favorite body part] off!  :'(

Seriously, it starts to snow in that area in late September. That's when the below freezing nights start too. By February it is winter wonderland.

But the highways are big and well maintained. Just lay low if when the weather is bad and wait for the roads to be cleared and sanded/salted. I hate to see Southerners on packed snow and ice, though. Their lack of snow experience is usually readily evident and telling folks to be careful is rarely sufficient.  Accelerate slowly, brake gently, turn into a skid to regain steering control, do not assume a black road surface is safe (could well be pure ice), bridges really do ice before roads, so you can lose control driving onto a bridge...  Prayer may be of some help at times too.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Jim Godward

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2007, 12:42:11 AM »
I'll add a few more to what Gary said.

On snow and ice, don't use the cruise control , do not lift your foot off the gas quickly or tromp on it either, use a gentle touch on the steering wheel.

Also be sure you have blankets, warm clothes and some food and water in case you get stranded, a shovel is good too as well as chains for at least the drive wheels.  All weather tires are good.

Some where I have a book on winter driving in Montana and if I can find it I will extract more as it will be applicable.  Be aware of temoeratures around Zero that time of year are the normal.  We currently have daytime temperatures in the 20 to low 30s and night time temperatures from -12 to +10 or so and we are over 400 miles south of Lake Louise!!

Montana Winter survival book, http://www.mdt.mt.gov/publications/docs/brochures/winter_maint/winter_survival.pdf
Jim
Jim & Pat Godward
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Len and Jo

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Re: Banff, Alberta Rocky Mountains
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2007, 10:07:17 AM »
We go to Michigan's UP most every winter to x-country ski and snowshoe.  We ALWAYS take a 'survival' pack with us in the trunk.  Some of its contents are: large snow shovel (one trip we dug/helped 3 cars out of snow banks while just going between Marquette and Munising one day in bad weather), tow strap w come-a-long, jug of salt/sand mix, heavy work gloves and stocking hats, matches, candles......   Mountain area....I would add tire chains (some areas REQUIRED), sleeping bags, extra food (couple boxes of food bars would have long shelf life, not freeze and provide calories), first aid kit, flashlight and good detailed local maps.  Have cell phone (and or CB) and make sure someone knows your trip and daily plans. Leaving the lodge for a day trip, tell people your plans.   If you have everything you probably will not need it.  If you don't then you will need it. 

Our personal worst trip from hell was driving from Seney to Marquette at night in a white out.  The trip from Detroit to Seney was great.  The roads were dry and clear.  Then we came into winds and snow off of Lake Superior.  We drove the 75 miles at 10-20 mph depending on the snow.  I focused on the road in front for tail lights (could see tail lights maybe 25-75 feet in front and road for 0-25 feet in the snow) and my wife watched the shoulder and guided me by saying it I was getting to close to the snow bank or drifting to far out into the road. Prayed that no one stopped on the road.   No place to pull off (not that could be seen at least).  The roads up there are well plowed in the winter but during snow storms with heavy winds you are on your own.
Len & Jo
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We 'B' RVing   Berkley, Michigan
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