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Author Topic: Winter in Wisconsin  (Read 347 times)

Winter in Wisconsin
« on: October 17, 2018, 07:11:51 PM »
Last week I winterized the water system in my Itasca Cambria 26A but I'm curious about my batteries.  I do have a battery disconnect switch to turn off the coach batteries, but I'm wondering if it's wiser for me to remove them entirely, and bring them in the house for winter.  I won't be using the RV and it will be stored in a semi-controlled indoor environment that is guaranteed to not dip below 40 degrees. 

Do you think I need to remove the batteries or will they survive for ~4 months as is?

Thanks!

michael2323jordan
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2007 Itasca Cambria 26A
81k miles
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darsben

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2018, 08:20:04 PM »
I would leave them in but disconnect the ground (negative) in case of parasitic drain
1990 Fleetwood Southwind on P30 chassis located in
Central NY in summer and beautiful Casa Grande AZ in winter

RVRAC

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2018, 11:57:19 PM »
Welcome to the Forum!

I would take them home with me.
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SpencerPJ

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2018, 07:05:36 AM »
I take mine out, but I also don't store outdoors.  I like to charge my battery once a month, in my garage where it stays. 

Under your circumstances, you'd probably be okay to leave in, make sure it is disconnected.  If you have a way to go there maybe every 30-45 days and charge overnight, that would be ideal.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2018, 08:27:22 AM »
To avoid shortening their useful life, the batteries need to be kept at full charge or nearly so all winter. If you can't keep a maintenance charger on them in storage, bring the batteries home and do it there.  4 months without any charging will result in dead batteries whether disconnected or not (self-discharge).
Gary
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Utclmjmpr

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2018, 09:00:08 AM »
 Don't forget the 1 -2 PERCENT of discharge DAILY that occurs with lead acid batteries.>>>Dan
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Hanr3

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2018, 09:18:18 PM »
I have three deep cycle batteries (two group 31's and a group 27) in my boat, and charge and disconnect them all winter. I store it outside under the lean-to of my shed, no heat. I used to bring them in the garage, but I'm getting too old to drag almost 250 pounds of batteries in/out of the boat.
I used to bring the riding mower battery in the garage, but I do the same as the boat now. Fully charged and disconnected.
I will do the same with the RV, fully charged and disconnected.
IF you can't bring the batteries in, then make sure they are charged and disconnected. They will be fine outside in the cold.

I used to bring them in the garage. I would line the batteries up in a row. Connect the charger to a different battery each day. It was my evening routine when I got home from work. Let the dogs out and rotate the charger to the next battery while they took care of business. I didn't find it made any difference. Leaving them sit for 3 months didn't have any negative effect on them. I drain them more in a weekend fishing trip then sitting for 3 months. On my 5th year with the mow battery and 2 of the boat batteries. The starting battery is 7 years old and will need replaced next year. Showing signs of not holding a charge as well as it used too.   
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Chakara

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2018, 09:38:05 PM »
  I live in NM - while we get cold - sub 0 is rare.  I use a good Progressive Dynamics converter so I just leave the rig plugged in.  Keeps them charged and de-sulficates every day keeping them happy.....

2018 Arctic Fox 27.5L
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darsben

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2018, 11:56:34 PM »
I think some of the posters misread the op's post.
He stores indoors with a minimum 40 degree temp.
My original answer stands
1990 Fleetwood Southwind on P30 chassis located in
Central NY in summer and beautiful Casa Grande AZ in winter

MikeFromMesa

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2018, 09:39:49 AM »
I think some of the posters misread the op's post.
He stores indoors with a minimum 40 degree temp.
My original answer stands

Please forgive my ignorance, but what is parasitic drain?

We live in southern Arizona so the lowest temperatures we ever see are about 40F, and we use the RV frequently during the winter anyway. Our problem is similar to that of the OP during the summer, but the opposite. Temperatures here get well over 110F in July and August and I don't really know what to do about storing the batteries in the heat. If poorly maintained batteries have a very short life span when the temperatures are really high.

Alfa38User

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2018, 09:47:59 AM »
Quote
Please forgive my ignorance, but what is parasitic drain?

Any battery drain that is constantly there. It could be the current needed to maintain the radio channel selections, the Propane detector, which is often connected directly to the battery and not run through a battery disconnect switch, etc. In fact, any load not disconnected when the unit is put into storage is considered a parasitic drain, usually quite small but always there. Batteries do self discharge normally adding to the problem. A battery maintainer or trickle charger and plugged in can help with is kind of problem.

Quote
...I don't really know what to do about storing the batteries in the heat.

You could always remove them to your garage where it is not so warm but that could become a real PITA if you use the RV a lot.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2018, 09:56:13 AM by Alfa38User »
Stu
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MikeFromMesa

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2018, 11:42:14 AM »
Any battery drain that is constantly there. It could be the current needed to maintain the radio channel selections, the Propane detector, which is often connected directly to the battery and not run through a battery disconnect switch, etc. In fact, any load not disconnected when the unit is put into storage is considered a parasitic drain, usually quite small but always there. Batteries do self discharge normally adding to the problem. A battery maintainer or trickle charger and plugged in can help with is kind of problem.

Ah, I see.

If I do not disconnect the house battery in my current RV the battery dies in about 2-3 weeks due to the drains you mention, but I did not know that this had a name.

You could always remove them to your garage where it is not so warm but that could become a real PITA if you use the RV a lot.

Perhaps, but the garage is also very, very hot in the summer. It is enclosed, so there is no direct sunlight, but the RV is stored in a covered area now, so it does not sit in the sunlight either. This is a change for me as the covered space only just came available about 6 weeks ago.

We use our RV mostly in the winter since it is impossible to sleep in it during the summer. It has an AC but the output is directly over the bed and trying to sleep with the AC on is like trying to sleep under a jet engine. Tried it once in Las Vegas and both my wife and I decided at 3 am that it was just a waste of time. On the other hand being on the road at 3:15 am meant that we made good time heading home.

darsben

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Re: Winter in Wisconsin
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2018, 03:57:33 PM »
When my motor home gets to Arizona this winter it will set until May.  I run my generator one hour a month and it seems to be enough.
1990 Fleetwood Southwind on P30 chassis located in
Central NY in summer and beautiful Casa Grande AZ in winter