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Author Topic: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)  (Read 193 times)

ArizonaNavion

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2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« on: December 06, 2018, 05:43:08 PM »
I crawled underneath my 2019 Winnebago Navion last week (2,082 miles) to familiarize myself with its systems/tanks. Minutes earlier, I had turned on the 2 LP tank safety switches (inside/outside) to facilitate gas flow. While below the rig, I discovered a solenoid device on the vapor valve. This LP valve leads from the tank to the interior mechanicals (stove/furnace). This solenoid on the LP tank underneath the rig was HOT to the touch. I estimate 130F to 150F. About the temperature of black pavement on a hot summer day. Couldn't keep my fingers on it due to the heat for more than 5 to 8 seconds. The solenoid is about the size of a gaming die and silver in color. I believe that I have the "6849" model by Manchester LP tanks. Have read through all Navion/View owner's manuals and could find no reference to this issue. I found some scant references to hot LP tank solenoids in marine/boating forums online and also called the Winnebago product line 1-800-537-1885. Winnebago rep Chris was helpful and confirmed that these solenoids do warm up when in the on position. However, I thought that I would crowdsource the experience of other RV owners because something that is nearly glowing hot within a centimeter of the exterior of an LP tank seems like a dangerous scenario. The solenoid goes cold when at least 1 of the 2 LP switches is turned off. Thank you in advance. Interested to know if others have experienced the same. Photo attached of solenoid on tank.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 11:42:19 PM by ArizonaNavion »
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Alfa38User

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2018, 08:26:01 AM »
Welcome

The part number 6849 appears to be the tank itself according to this web site:

http://www.mantank.com/products/rv-propane-containers-accessories/

What did Winnie say it was for?? It might be considerable cooler should propane be flowing through it.
Stu
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"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2018, 08:35:30 AM »
Apparently you have a remote shut-off for the LP tank. That's not part of the Manchester tank - it is a Winnie-installed item.

Your estimate of the temperature may be a little high. If you can keep your finger on it for 5-8 seconds without suffering a 3rd degree burn, the temperature is no more than about 130.   I'd still be concerned, though. A solenoid shouldn't be more than warm, i.e. around 95-100 F.

As was mentioned, it should cool down some if propane is actually flowing through it, but that's not really important because most of the time there will be no flow.
Gary
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John Canfield

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2018, 08:47:26 AM »
Welcome to the forum! That is a continuous duty solenoid which will remain operated while you have the gas switch in the on position. When you get the tank filled, that valve must be off and nobody can remain inside during filling.

I suggest you buy one of those non-contact thermometers ("IR gun") and check the temperature that way. If it still seems high to you, call Manchester or your local LP gas supplier and chat with a tech.

BTW, a good use for the IR gun is to check tire temperatures when you stop for a break. I check sidewall temperatures and tread temperatures - they should all be fairly close (within maybe 10-20*). If one tire is significantly hotter than the others, then that's a warning something's wrong with the tire. I pull a trailer with my Jeep on it and I check wheel bearing temperatures in addition to tire temps.
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penman39

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2018, 07:08:13 PM »

BTW, a good use for the IR gun is to check tire temperatures when you stop for a break. I check sidewall temperatures and tread temperatures - they should all be fairly close (within maybe 10-20*). If one tire is significantly hotter than the others, then that's a warning something's wrong with the tire. I pull a trailer with my Jeep on it and I check wheel bearing temperatures in addition to tire temps.

Good idea John! Instead of watching the fuel pump at the station climb to the $100 region, grab an IR gun and shoot the crap out of all your wheels and tires. It'll bring peace of mind and leave you free to mentally add your fuel costs for the trip.  ;D
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 05:48:52 PM by penman39 »
Carl
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QZ

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2018, 10:03:06 AM »
I'd be wondering what the amp draw is. Especially when dry camping. I've worked with a lot of continuous duty solenoids and contactors years back but don't remember them being real hot.

If you use an intermittent duty solenoid such as those used for starting then not only might they get very hot but they burn out soon. Continuous duty usually have an initial high amp draw as they pull in then they settle to a much lower draw when the plunger has seated.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 10:06:36 AM by QZ »

FunSteak

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Re: 2019 Navion LP Tank Solenoid Too Hot To Touch? Normal? (PHOTO)
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2018, 08:11:09 AM »
I'd be wondering what the amp draw is. Especially when dry camping. I've worked with a lot of continuous duty solenoids and contactors years back but don't remember them being real hot.

If you use an intermittent duty solenoid such as those used for starting then not only might they get very hot but they burn out soon. Continuous duty usually have an initial high amp draw as they pull in then they settle to a much lower draw when the plunger has seated.

IIRC, when looking at models with this solenoid, I seem to recall a constant draw of around 1A.  I could be wrong, but I remember thinking I wasn't too keen on that draw for boodocking.
JP & Karen
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