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Author Topic: Fishing Reels  (Read 2235 times)

djw2112

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Fishing Reels
« on: February 20, 2019, 09:56:34 PM »
Can anyone explain to me what the hype is for expensive reels?   I dont understand what a $200 reel does that my $25 reel does not do.
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Arch Hoagland

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2019, 10:37:54 PM »
It catches more suckers, as in...you are a sucker for buying it!!!
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djw2112

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2019, 10:57:31 PM »
It catches more suckers, as in...you are a sucker for buying it!!!

Thats what i figured lol
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Tom

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2019, 11:22:29 PM »
What kind of reel?
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djw2112

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2019, 11:25:56 PM »
What kind of reel?

I dont like open reals but this was an open real.   I do mostly trout or bass fishing.
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Broke Boater

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2019, 01:12:42 AM »
There are huge differences in reels. Starting with is it made from plastic, graphite, stamp steel, cast aluminum to cnc machined billet housing, SS gears or brass, drag ratings, there are a lot of differences. I get what you are saying since you mention Trout. But even in that category of fish, light drag, small line capacity there internals that can be better then others. My Fly reel I use for Stripers was 450. but a Fly reel costing 150. would be just fine since a Fly reel basically just hold line. On the other hand, I have Saltwater reels that sell between 500.00 and 600.00 and this is where you can't go cheap. I have some small spinners for stream Trout fishing, I think I paid around 30. for them. But we do very little stream fishing, plus trout are in very clean freshwater vs saltwater and are pretty easy on gear so the reels will last awhile. If we are at a lake, we always have a boat to fish from and those reels are a little bigger and more money since they take a little more abuse depending how we are fishing. Downriggers, trolling with junk ( flashers ) all put pressure on the reels, so buying better equipment makes sense. Also how many days a year a guy fishes, my casting reels for Stripers take a beating since its non stop casting all day several days a year and a 40.00 casting reel will fail much sooner then a 160.00 casting reel. Buy nice,,cry once, really is appropriate here. I'm not sure what reels you are comparing, but a small spinner costing 25.00 was not built cover the list of species of that same size reel costing 200.00 and there lays the difference,,,gregg
« Last Edit: February 21, 2019, 01:15:56 AM by Broke Boater »
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Wizard46

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2019, 08:20:44 AM »
If it's pretty, the right color and cheap enough, go for it. Probably catch just as many fish anyway.
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Gizmo100

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2019, 09:52:19 AM »
There are huge differences in reels. Starting with is it made from plastic, graphite, stamp steel, cast aluminum to cnc machined billet housing, SS gears or brass, drag ratings, there are a lot of differences. I get what you are saying since you mention Trout. But even in that category of fish, light drag, small line capacity there internals that can be better then others. My Fly reel I use for Stripers was 450. but a Fly reel costing 150. would be just fine since a Fly reel basically just hold line. On the other hand, I have Saltwater reels that sell between 500.00 and 600.00 and this is where you can't go cheap. I have some small spinners for stream Trout fishing, I think I paid around 30. for them. But we do very little stream fishing, plus trout are in very clean freshwater vs saltwater and are pretty easy on gear so the reels will last awhile. If we are at a lake, we always have a boat to fish from and those reels are a little bigger and more money since they take a little more abuse depending how we are fishing. Downriggers, trolling with junk ( flashers ) all put pressure on the reels, so buying better equipment makes sense. Also how many days a year a guy fishes, my casting reels for Stripers take a beating since its non stop casting all day several days a year and a 40.00 casting reel will fail much sooner then a 160.00 casting reel. Buy nice,,cry once, really is appropriate here. I'm not sure what reels you are comparing, but a small spinner costing 25.00 was not built cover the list of species of that same size reel costing 200.00 and there lays the difference,,,gregg

Everything he said X's 2

I've done a lot of bass fishing and the cheap reels just don't hold up.
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Tom

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2019, 11:09:58 AM »
It's tough to disagree with Broke Boater, but FWIW here's my story/perspective:


I've fished for over 60 years. Started out fishing for trout with gear that my Dad made - pole was a bamboo stick with eyelets screwed into it, and the reel was made from an empty cotton reel and a piece from an erector kit (aka Mechano kit as they were called in the UK), and a bent pin for a hook. Got my first "real" fishing pole (fiberglass spinning rod) as a gift from my sister for my 12th birthday, and my first fly fishing rod (split cane) as a gift from my parents for my 14th birthday (I still have that rod in 'new' condition and the original bag).

Over the years, I've bought and still own mainly inexpensive and some expensive gear for a variety of types of fishing, both salt water and fresh water. There are cases where you get what you pay for e.g. my bait casting reels were relatively expensive, but function far better than my cheaper ones (e.g. easier to cast and limit overruns). OTOH I have inexpensive spinning and bait casting rods and open face spinning reels that function just fine.

Although I've fly-fished for many years, I didn't buy an expensive fly rod and accompanying fly reel until a few years ago. Each time I use this outfit, I wonder if it's really worth the money I paid for it, and often defer to my inexpensive alternatives.

I believe my inexpensive gear still functions well because of the way I look after my stuff, although accidents do occasionally happen.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 01:15:23 PM by Tom »
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Roy M

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2019, 12:51:56 PM »
I don't buy expensive gear, I don't fish enough to justify it, but have had reason to cuss a cheap reel more than once. The lock didn't hold, the bail wouldn't stay open or the spool came off in the middle of a retrieve. I try to find a the middle of the road, I would rather be fishing than fighting with my gear.

old_toys

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2019, 08:56:33 PM »
no doubt some of the more expensive reels have better components internally and some have sucker factor involved.
I still have and use three Mitchel 300 reels I got in 1962
I fly fish streams and bought my first fly outfit in 1968. the reel cost $3.24 after tax and i'm still using that today. it just holds my line.

Hanr3

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2019, 09:19:42 PM »
As with most things, you get what you pay for. buying a cheap reel is fine if your fishing a couple times a year. Eventually it will wear out or break. If that cheap reel lasted 5 years or better, buy another cheap reel. If it didn't make it thru the season, time to pony up some more money.

I just finished cleaning and lubricating all my reels. I'll put new line on them within a week or two. My first Crappie tournament is the middle of March. I prefer Shimano reels, typically the Sahara, Sedona series. I have some for 4-6 pound line, and some for 6-8 pound line. I use them for fresh water fish, mostly Crappie, Walleye, Small Mouth, and Northern Pike. Price range $50-$80. I do have some $10 Shimano's that I use for spider rigging. Well 8 of them as of today. They are mostly line holders and are attached to poles anywhere in length from 10' to 16'.

Cheap is a relative term. No way I would spend $500 on a reel, but I'm not deep sea fishing for monster fish either.   
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djw2112

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2019, 04:30:16 PM »
what about brand name, if i am going to spend $80 on a real, does brand name really matter?

I also have to think about the fact that if i get more expensive equipment, that means i also invite thieves to steal them, but who is going to steal a walmart reel lol   

And if thingsget stolen, does insurance pay for the equipment.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2019, 04:37:45 PM by djw2112 »
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Oldgator73

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2019, 05:01:08 PM »
Cane pole with a hook, sinker and bobber. Iíve caught a lot of fish on cane poles.
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Broke Boater

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2019, 06:47:41 PM »
Penn, Shimano, Okuma have reels in the 80.00-100.00 range,,,gregg
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Arch Hoagland

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2019, 06:51:03 PM »
Is Mitchell still making openface reels? I still have mine from the 50's.
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old_toys

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2019, 06:59:12 PM »
looks like you can still buy a Mitchell reel but I doubt it is the original manufacturer.
I had two of those reduced volume spools for my Mitchell reels that I put in an old tackle box with a wide rubber band around the mono that was wound on it. when I removed them from that old tackle box last year the rubber bands had eaten into the spool plastic and ruined both.

Tom

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2019, 09:46:20 PM »
Quote from: djw2112
what about brand name, if i am going to spend $80 on a real, does brand name really matter?


That might depend on the kind of reel do you plan to purchase, i.e. for what purpose.

My Shimano baitcasting reels, used locally for tossing bass lures, each cost me over $200. I also have cheaper ones made by other companies, and they lack the controls that help prevent overruns and horrible bird's nests. Good "thumb control" can help a lot, but the Shimano reels are so much easier to use.

Not all Shimano reels are expensive, and I have several of their open-faced spinning reels that I believe I bought at Walmart, along with Abu Garcia reels.

I have found that fly reels purchased at Walmart for around $30 work quite adequately for my needs (as someone said, they essentially just hold line). I also have a couple of more expensive fly reels by Orvis/Batenkill, but for my needs aren't really worth the extra $$.

Saltwater &/or big game fishing takes a bigger toll on your equipment. Cheap reels don't last long in this environment, whereas a couple of my Penn reels work fine after 50+ years.

We could repeat this discussion for rods/poles  ;D
Quote
I also have to think about the fact that if i get more expensive equipment, that means i also invite thieves to steal them
I doubt that someone determined to break into our RV or our S&B home will discriminate between brands of fishing reel that they steal  ;)
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djw2112

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2019, 07:47:32 AM »
Tom i was thinking right out of the boat not in the RV.    You are correct about poles and rods too
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Tom

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2019, 10:18:53 AM »
Quote from: djw2112
Tom i was thinking right out of the boat not in the RV.


I suspect that anything left unattended and visible in an open boat would be fair game. But I understand that, anyone knowing what they're looking at might be tempted to grab expensive gear before WalMart gear. Personally, I hate when someone can't leave others' property alone, but realize that might be a naiive comment.
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Broke Boater

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2019, 01:08:54 PM »
Penn, Shimano, Okuma have reels in the 80.00-100.00 range,,,gregg
I should of added in a spinner.  You'll have to call your own fouls here as far as price point. Go to a outdoor shop that has a large selection and put your hands on a couple different ones and come back with a narrowed down list for people to chime in on. Otherwise you'll just get their favorite brand choice without any comparable counter brands and experiences ,,,gregg
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J32952

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2019, 01:41:09 PM »
Depends on what & where & how often you fish.  My small (2500-4000) Saltwater spinning reels all cost over $200, but I have $30 reels for grandkids & guests (disposable). Drags, gears, frame material all contribute to performance when needed.  Trolling offshore reels take a lot of abuse, yet cheap old Penns hold up...and some of the newer ones donít last a season!   Take them apart, replace a few bearings, and difference becomes clear.    Idk about fly reels, have a very expensive one (a gift) and 3 cheap..they just hold line in my limited view.
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Deano2002

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Re: Fishing Reels
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2019, 06:45:29 PM »
we are planning to go to gulf shores the first week of April and I have always wanted to fish in the ocean. Most all my gear was for grandchildren and some myself, I'm not much of a fisherman but, want to be more. I have an 8' medium pole thats never been used and just ordered Penn Pursuit II Spinning 5000 Fishing Reel from amazon by some peoples recommendations and, reviews are good. For me it should do all I want and who knows if I will ever use it again
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