Sponsored by Winnebago Industries

Author Topic: Prime Time?  (Read 281 times)

coy55boyrv

  • ---
  • Posts: 18
  • It's all about the journey...
Prime Time?
« on: September 13, 2019, 12:46:13 PM »
After going through the required plumbing repairs (replace kitchen sink and tub faucets, etc.) using city water pressure, I'm finally ready to test the water pump. I filled the tank, made sure the valves were open to eliminate air pockets, and turned on the pump. It made noise and vibrated (which I kind of expected) but didn't create any pressure. A small amount of water came out of the exterior shower, but I think it might be because of water left in the lines from the city water.

In the compartment where the water tank and pump live, there are 3 valves. I've figured out that one of them drains the water from the lines and another drains the tank. The third one is near the water pump and is connected to a clear flexible tube with a cap on the end. Is that used to prime the pump? If not, what's it for? Is there something else I'm missing?

edit by staff - changed message icon to topic solved
« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 07:34:37 AM by John Canfield »
I'd rather go for a ride and think about God than sit in a church and think about riding.

99 Winnebago Adventurer 32T
Ford chassis w/ 6.8L V10
My 'Toad' is a 5x10 enclosed w/ 2001 Goldwing

PJ Stough

  • ---
  • Posts: 1824
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2019, 12:51:33 PM »
I believe the clear is for drawing anti freeze into the system when winterizing.  There should be a valve to select to draw anti freeze, or to draw water from the fresh water tank.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2019, 12:54:57 PM by PJ Stough »
PJ Stough   Iowa
2005 Winnebago Voyage 38J

“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”--- Voltaire

SpencerPJ

  • ---
  • Posts: 1882
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2019, 01:09:05 PM »
I also believe the clear tube is to draw RV antifreeze for winterizing.  I would go around and close all faucets, including the outside one, open the cold, and suck on it.  (be careful)  Great way to prime the pump.  (I had an old Class C had to do that every spring).
2005 YukonXL
2012 Puma 21FS

Paul & Julie

PJ Stough

  • ---
  • Posts: 1824
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2019, 01:11:49 PM »
Does your RV have a valve for "tank fill"  and "city" where you attach the hose to fill the tank?
PJ Stough   Iowa
2005 Winnebago Voyage 38J

“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”--- Voltaire

coy55boyrv

  • ---
  • Posts: 18
  • It's all about the journey...
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2019, 01:38:57 PM »
A 'winterizing' valve makes sense. However, with the pump running I can change the valve to either position and get no vacuum at the tube nor do I get pressure in the line.

I would go around and close all faucets, including the outside one, open the cold, and suck on it.  (be careful)  Great way to prime the pump.
When you say 'open the cold', I'm not sure what you mean. (Sorry, new to RVing and still learning). Can you be more specific?

Does your RV have a valve for "tank fill"  and "city" where you attach the hose to fill the tank?
There is a 'city fill' port in the plumbing compartment (sewer, exterior shower, etc.). It pressurizes the water lines fine, but I couldn't find a way to fill the tank. There's a low pressure port located just above the tank compartment where I can insert a hose without a fitting on the end.
I'd rather go for a ride and think about God than sit in a church and think about riding.

99 Winnebago Adventurer 32T
Ford chassis w/ 6.8L V10
My 'Toad' is a 5x10 enclosed w/ 2001 Goldwing

SpencerPJ

  • ---
  • Posts: 1882
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2019, 02:27:11 PM »
A 'winterizing' valve makes sense. However, with the pump running I can change the valve to either position and get no vacuum at the tube nor do I get pressure in the line.
That to me indicates that the pump is not primed, or internals not wet that actual lubricates the internals of the pump, that allows the pumping action to work.  Think of a dried out 'o' ring.  It could easily leak, but once wet, it swells a tad and seals.

When you say 'open the cold', I'm not sure what you mean.
I was implying to open the cold on a faucet and suck on the faucet to help draw water through the pump and prime it.  You could also do this with the outside shower, remove head, turn on cold and suck a few times. (or a while)
2005 YukonXL
2012 Puma 21FS

Paul & Julie

muskoka guy

  • ---
  • Posts: 931
  • 2000 Coachmen Santara 370 isb cummins diesel
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2019, 09:26:09 PM »
I had a 2000 Adventurer. If you don't get the valves on the outside compartment set right, you will only get a trickle out of the tap. It should have a valve that says tank fill, and city water. It has to be on city water. Then turn on the pump. If you don't get it right, the pump will just continue to run and run, and never build pressure. You will know you have it right when the pump builds up pressure, then shuts off. Its been a few years since I sold the Winnebago, so Im going from memory here. I loved my Adventurer, but bought a diesel instead. Cheers.

Ernie n Tara

  • ---
  • Posts: 3849
  • Life is Good - Together
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2019, 08:01:15 AM »
That hole above the water inlet is probably to fill the water tank. It sounds as if you may have an empty tank.

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
2012 Jeep Rubicon - Dozer (orange - kinda)
2006 Jeep Wrangler

coy55boyrv

  • ---
  • Posts: 18
  • It's all about the journey...
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2019, 06:05:23 PM »
Well, I fixed it although I'm not really sure how. I verified the valves were all in the correct position. Next, I checked the output side of the water pump and it was OK. The only other thing I did was to add 20lbs. pressure to the accumulator. I went inside and opened all the water valves and turned on the pump. I immediately got a thin stream of water. I closed the kitchen faucet and then the bath sink and tub. By the time I got back to the kitchen and opened the valve again, it was a healthy stream.

Maybe when I disconnected the output side hose, it allowed water into the pump to prime it. I can't imagine the accumulator had anything to do with it, but I could be wrong. At this point, I'm just happy it works!
I'd rather go for a ride and think about God than sit in a church and think about riding.

99 Winnebago Adventurer 32T
Ford chassis w/ 6.8L V10
My 'Toad' is a 5x10 enclosed w/ 2001 Goldwing

John Canfield

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 13133
    • Jane and John's Internet Home
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2019, 07:14:58 AM »
The pump shouldn't take very long to prime assuming it has water available on the pump inlet and isn't sucking air; also the water tank needs to be vented. If that pump looks original, I would replace it just because.
--John
2005 Horizon 40AD, 2006 Jeep Rubicon Unlimited
Our Horizon projects
Our weather

SpencerPJ

  • ---
  • Posts: 1882
Re: Prime Time?
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2019, 07:15:27 AM »
Well, I fixed it although I'm not really sure how.  At this point, I'm just happy it works!

Shhhh, don't tell the wife that, just say 'I fixed it'.  Glad you are working.  :)) 
2005 YukonXL
2012 Puma 21FS

Paul & Julie