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Author Topic: RV travel alone  (Read 4875 times)

lacey954

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  • Posts: 7
Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #30 on: November 30, 2019, 01:27:20 PM »
Thanks for the comments Debra, I was just wondering how it was for single people (men or women) traveling alone Im sure I will need alot of practice before I attmpt to go to an actual rv park I like the concept of boondocking very much so I think that wil be the road I take until I feel confident but your right after having a lead foot all my life my big adjustment will be staying in the far right lane and taking my time.  Im looking forward to the journey!

SpencerPJ

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  • Posts: 2801
Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2019, 05:53:20 PM »
I also would suggest (as I would to my daughters or sisters), have some type of personal protection.  Even if you get some bear spray, something, anything.  Personally, I suggest a firearm and training.  Not to start that issue on this forum, but boondocking, animals or creepers.  Just be safe  :))  Usually never ever a problem, but society, well we all watch the news.
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WILDEBILL308

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  • Posts: 2983
Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #32 on: November 30, 2019, 07:02:59 PM »
Thanks for the comments Debra, I was just wondering how it was for single people (men or women) traveling alone Im sure I will need alot of practice before I attmpt to go to an actual rv park I like the concept of boondocking very much so I think that wil be the road I take until I feel confident but your right after having a lead foot all my life my big adjustment will be staying in the far right lane and taking my time.  Im looking forward to the journey!

I agree with Debra. just go slow and think before you do anything. Most problems happen when people get distracted and arn't thinking.
 How soon do you plan to get started? If you going to try boondocking I would do it at a full hookup campground. All you have to do is turn off the power disconnect everything and see how long you can go. You can learn how long your batteries last, water and holding tanks. It is a lot easier when you run out of power or water to be able to go outside and correct the problem without having to hook up and drive someplace.
 If you have somewhere you can stay in the driveway that will work two.
Have a tablet and a pen so you can make notes when you come across something you need write it down.When you are done work the list. It is a real pain to be at a remote site and you forgot the corkscrew. ;)
Bill
   
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
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Old_Crow

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  • Phormer Phantom Phixer
Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #33 on: December 03, 2019, 06:33:53 AM »
Have a tablet and a pen so you can make notes when you come across something you need write it down.When you are done work the list. It is a real pain to be at a remote site and you forgot the corkscrew. ;)
Bill
 

Laugh if you want, but the two years we hosted at the Grand Canyon, the corkscrew was the 2nd most borrowed item we carried.  Top item was "some way to start a fire".
Wally Crow
Retired 30+ year ASE Master Auto Tech
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fourtrax57

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  • Posts: 5
Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #34 on: December 03, 2019, 11:18:16 AM »
One thing to consider if upgrading trucks. I had a very heavy duty FRONT bumper installed on the 3/4 ton pickup. The reason was to have a class 3 hitch
on the front. This enables me to manuever the trailer into tight places if I am alone. Positioning a trailer in a tight spot (for ANY reason) is easy when you can see everything over the front of the truck. It's not a big deal to unhook from regular towing and rehook to the front hitch WHEN NECESSARY to be able to see. Manuevering the trailer is much easier when you can see it directly out the windshield. This is only necessary for some places where camp sites are smaller or perhaps parking it in a storage (or any) tight spot.

Something to consider anyway. Plus a good heavy duty front bumper / grill guard keeps deer & other critters out of the radiator.

RANCH HAND is one brand:

 https://bumpersuperstore.com/c-702679-superduty-bumpers.html