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Author Topic: RV travel alone  (Read 5009 times)

lacey954

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RV travel alone
« on: November 16, 2019, 02:00:26 PM »
Hi I intend to purchase a 30 ft airstream and was needing some input from single travelers. Pros Cons necessary equiptment. I am a retired female  have no RV experience so would appreciate any suggestions

Utclmjmpr

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2019, 02:25:52 PM »
 Is there a reason for the Airstream in particular??  Trailer or motorhome??  one is a lot more work than the other, and could sour you on the lifestyle..>>>Dan

( Welcome to the forum)
« Last Edit: November 16, 2019, 02:31:26 PM by Utclmjmpr »
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Lou Schneider

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2019, 02:30:08 PM »
Welcome to The RV Forum!

Equipment for a single RVer is really no different that what a couple needs.  It really depends on what kind or RVing you want to do.  Will you be going from one RV park to another where you have full hookups, do you want to get off the beaten path and boondock, or some combination of the two?

There are several ways to get up to speed.   Hanging out on Forums like this is one way.   Escapees offers their RV Boot Camp several times a year.  It's three days of instruction designed to get you up to speed on what to look for and how to safely operate an RV.  You don't need an RV to attend, just stay in a nearby motel.

Then there are groups for RVing singles.  I like the WINs (Wandering Individuals Network) at https://rvsingles.org/.  They organize informal circuits that travel around the country, stopping and exploring the local area for several days before moving on.  They're very good at finding free or low cost places to stay and you can join or leave the circuit at any time.

Joining a group like this is a good way to meet other single RVers and share their expertise about what works for them or doesn't.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2019, 02:42:37 PM by Lou Schneider »

SpencerPJ

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2019, 02:35:28 PM »
Welcome to the Forum. A 30' Airstream is going to require a well equipped 3/4 ton truck, Diesel would be best; and be a handful for a first time RVr.  That's a tall order for first time, even myself who is seasoned pulling trailers and boats, it's a lot to do by yourself. I admire your passion.  Have you ever driven or backed up a trailer?  I'm not saying you can't, I'm saying that it will be a heck of a learning curve.  A 30-35' Class A would be ideal for you, pulling a small car.  There are other single ladies in this Forum, hopefully they chime in with their experiences. 
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2012 Puma 21BH TT
Paul & Julie



"Never argue with stupid people. They bring you down to their level and beat you with experience" - Mark Twain

lacey954

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2019, 04:00:22 PM »
thanks for all your comments I like the look of the airstream as it will be my permanent home. I have always driven a truck was thinking of upgrading to a 250 that what I have been advised to do Did trailer a small boat years ago lol but I know this will be different will be doing both boondocking and parks so there seems to be alot of extras I will need figured I would spend a few months just driving and parking until I am comfortable will certainly look into the other forum that you mentioned

Oldgator73

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2019, 05:30:10 PM »
Is there a reason for the Airstream in particular??  Trailer or motorhome??  one is a lot more work than the other, and could sour you on the lifestyle..>>>Dan

( Welcome to the forum)

If you are saying a TT or 5th wheel is a lot more work than a MH I will have to respectfully disagree. We fulltimed in a 5th wheel and could get set up in less than 30 minutes. We now have a small TT and can get set up in mere minutes. If you are referring to on the road ease it is a moot point since she is traveling solo. Purchase what you like and learn to live with it.
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier
1952 Wife
Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

Utclmjmpr

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2019, 06:42:42 PM »

 Comparing your 30 minutes ,or even half that, to my 10 seconds isn't a fair race... And we haven't started on the labor involved...
    >>>Dan
Vary rare American Tradition 38TT/330 turbo Cummins
Last year Jeep liberty 4 down
72 VW Baja 4 down
Cedar City, Utah
USAF vet. 59-63
FMCA F312919
 
You can't fix stupid,, but you CAN numb it with a 2X4

Oldgator73

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2019, 06:49:33 PM »
Comparing your 30 minutes ,or even half that, to my 10 seconds isn't a fair race... And we haven't started on the labor involved...
    >>>Dan

10 seconds? Really?
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
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Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

WILDEBILL308

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2019, 07:22:36 PM »
thanks for all your comments I like the look of the airstream as it will be my permanent home. I have always driven a truck was thinking of upgrading to a 250 that what I have been advised to do Did trailer a small boat years ago lol but I know this will be different will be doing both boondocking and parks so there seems to be alot of extras I will need figured I would spend a few months just driving and parking until I am comfortable will certainly look into the other forum that you mentioned
First of all welcome to the forum and congratulations on your choice to join the RV lifestyle. I know some of it will look to be overwhelming and somewhat intimidating to start with. Don't let it get you down. You said you have been looking at You Tube. Have you looked at this channel?https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw5WYtMXQ799GErKpvR_5Rw
They have live and travel in an airstream and have many tips and suggestions about life in a airstream.
If you are upgrading your truck I would go diesel at least a 250 HD.
What is the timeline you are looking at? What part of the country do you live in now?
Just a tease, https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/used-rvs-for-sale/travel-trailer
Let me know if you have any questions.
Bill
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Utclmjmpr

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2019, 08:39:35 PM »

 Would I lie to you???  >>>D
Vary rare American Tradition 38TT/330 turbo Cummins
Last year Jeep liberty 4 down
72 VW Baja 4 down
Cedar City, Utah
USAF vet. 59-63
FMCA F312919
 
You can't fix stupid,, but you CAN numb it with a 2X4

Oldgator73

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2019, 08:55:32 PM »
Would I lie to you???  >>>D

Evidently.
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier
1952 Wife
Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

JudyJB

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2019, 09:23:22 PM »
That is a big trailer, but if you are full-timing, you might find storage to be a problem as trailers do not have the "basement" storage that motorhomes or 5th wheels have.  I met a lady a couple of weeks ago that loved her airstream but found the storage to be a serious problem.

A motorhome is a lot easier for a single person to handle than a trailer, but good luck to you.

I've been traveling alone in a 32' motorhome for over 7 years, by the way.  Never had any problems with security or feeling lonely. 
Full-timing for over eight years and 145,000 miles in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2019, 08:47:34 AM »
Debating whether set-up is 10 minutes or 25 minutes is of small merit - it's not a race. A single lady may appreciate the physical labor difference, but even that can be minimal if the trailer has a powered leveling system.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

lacey954

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2019, 09:19:02 AM »
Im comitted to the classic airstream dont want to tow any car I will have enough to do ans as far as storage I am downsizing big time it might be a problem as JudyJB has suggested but now not so much the newer classics have a leveling system power jack etc. so some of the set up should go smoothly with plenty of practice I watch loloho on you tube I think they are very informative but I will look at your suggestions Wild Bill thank you

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2019, 09:51:19 AM »
A 30 ft Airstream Classic weighs in at about 10,000 lbs when loaded, so definitely in the 3/4 ton (F250/2500) truck arena. Or a SRW (single rear wheel) F350/3500.  I strongly recommend a diesel as well.  The truck should have a tow rating in the 12,000+ range and an OCCC (payload) somewhere north of 2200 lbs. (Most diesel 250/2500 should easily meet those specs).   A quality weight distributing hitch is wise as well, e.g. an Equal-I-Zer, E2 Fastway, Reese Straitline or similar.

I personally feel a hydraulic leveler system and electric tongue jack are well worth the price and they can be readily added to a new or used trailer if needed.   If you expect to camp off-grid (no shore power hook-up) at all, you will probably want an inverter and additional batteries., and maybe some solar too.  If you expect to always use campsites that have at least minimal power available, I'd skip the inverter, at least initially.


For fulltime living the trailer should have a 50A shore-power electrical system. You can get by on 30A, but it's smarter & easier to avoid the hassle form the git-go.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Oldgator73

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2019, 09:55:24 AM »
Im comitted to the classic airstream dont want to tow any car I will have enough to do ans as far as storage I am downsizing big time it might be a problem as JudyJB has suggested but now not so much the newer classics have a leveling system power jack etc. so some of the set up should go smoothly with plenty of practice I watch loloho on you tube I think they are very informative but I will look at your suggestions Wild Bill thank you

I think you will do fine with setup. It really doesnít matter how long it takes you, however, the setup for the Airstream shouldnít be that big a deal. Unhook, level, jacks down, power, water, sewer and then adult drink time. Have fun!
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier
1952 Wife
Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

LarsMac

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2019, 12:25:03 PM »
If you have some experience with pulling a trailer, already, you'll be fine, there. It takes some practice to get started, but the principals don't really change that much because of length of the trailer.

If you don't have trailer experience, rent a Uhaul for a day or two, and practice in a parking lot to get a feel for the basics.

And you can find driver training courses that will get you all you need to know.

2000 Itasca Sundancer 430V - Ford V-10
Towing 2007 Saturn Vue with Blue Ox bar and Even Brake

ďAll I ever needed was a wheel in my hand and four on the road.Ē -- Apologies, or Thanks, to Jack Kerouac

Isaac-1

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2019, 02:57:25 PM »
Let me address another side to solo travel, I am married, but about 1/3 of my travel is solo travel, being on my own for typically 1-2 weeks.  For example my recent 25 day trip where my wife was along for the first 12 days, and my college age son joined me for the last 3 days. 

I find that my daily routine in the RV is different when I travel solo vs with my wife or son, for one thing I find there are a lot of seating positions i don't use when travelling solo.  My coach has 7 possible seating positions (3 captains chairs, 2 dining table chairs, and a 2 position J sofa with integrated recliner).  When travelling solo I find I never use the captains chairs except for the drivers seat while driving, only ever use the rear dining table chair, and one end of the sofa.  In comparison when my wife and I are together the seating positions are a lot more dynamic depending on what is going on, and I will toggle back and forth between which dining table seat I am using depending on what else is going on (facing forward vs aft).  Much the same can be said about other routines which vary depending on occupancy, for example when travelling solo I can easily go a week between needing to dump the tanks without doing active water conservation, vs 3-4 days when my wife is there.  As such if I am only spending 1 or 2 nights at a location I will be much more inclined to dry camp, or not bother hooking up water and sewer, making setup much quicker, that 10 seconds or so someone mentioned above having a motorhome with levelling jacks.  Though honestly it is often more like 2-3 minutes, pull in, spend 15 seconds levelling, another 30-45 seconds closing off the curtains, plus about a minute to walk outside, and plug in the electric cord.
2002 Safari Trek 2830

lacey954

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2019, 10:01:18 AM »
My issue with traveling solo is not where Im going to sit in the trailer lol is is a back up camera necessary, when I buy the truck what does everyone think of the pro ride hitch from what I understand there isnt much sway with these I am not a helpless female being a nurse for 30 yrs has made me pretty good at putting stuff together but I want as few problems as possible I dont want to have to worry about much of anything except putting out the chair and starting the blender.

WILDEBILL308

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2019, 10:26:41 AM »
My issue with traveling solo is not where Im going to sit in the trailer lol is is a back up camera necessary, when I buy the truck what does everyone think of the pro ride hitch from what I understand there isnt much sway with these I am not a helpless female being a nurse for 30 yrs has made me pretty good at putting stuff together but I want as few problems as possible I dont want to have to worry about much of anything except putting out the chair and starting the blender.
I think you are headed in the right direction. "is a backup camera necessary" I am going to say yes. You can get a wireless one for the trailer and some of the ones that come on the new trucks are realey good.
True you could get buy without one but maneuvering the trailer and hooking up would be much harder without one. Remember when backing in to a spot. if you have any concerns STOP get out and go look. Look UP to be aware of low wires, tree limbs.
Bill 
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

LarsMac

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2019, 10:34:41 AM »
I don't know that a back-up camera is "necessary" - I got along for years without one.
But now that I have one, It certainly makes life a lot easier.
I highly recommend getting one.

2000 Itasca Sundancer 430V - Ford V-10
Towing 2007 Saturn Vue with Blue Ox bar and Even Brake

ďAll I ever needed was a wheel in my hand and four on the road.Ē -- Apologies, or Thanks, to Jack Kerouac

lacey954

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2019, 11:37:51 AM »
Thank you for your input Issac and wild Bill I do watch loloho the site you suggested and the couple are very informative I live in ft lauderdale area and have been to ft myers to airstream dealers so pretty much know what I want just truck add ons Im indecisive about Will be buying a truck after first of year I know all you guys love your diesel trucks but Im not sure about that Too many energy sources,gas for generator propane  solar batteries deisel for truck I dont know if I want all that. I do understand mileage is better and climbing mts etc but Im not convinced for me

muskoka guy

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2019, 01:05:49 PM »
A generator is one thing you haven't touched on. If you plan on doing any boondocking, you will need a generator. Most travel trailers do not come with a generator. Most class Cs and As do come with one. Not many 5th wheel trailers have them, but almost all fifth wheel toy haulers do have them. Maybe you don't plan on doing any Off grid camping, Walmart overnights, or boondocking in general. If you do, you will have to deal with a generator big enough to run air conditioners, as well as hauling fuel cans. This can be a problem for a single person. You could buy two smaller generators that will run together the make enough electricity. Maybe you are only staying at rv parks, I don't know. If I were full timing , I would not consider a travel trailer, or any other rv that did not have an on board generator. I wouldn't consider traveling in an rv without an onboard generator. I owned several travel trailers, and hauled around a 3500 watt generator and gas. Its much easier to just push the button, and have power to run air conditioners, or a microwave. Good luck in whatever you choose.

Lou Schneider

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2019, 02:18:39 PM »
Will be buying a truck after first of year I know all you guys love your diesel trucks but Im not sure about that Too many energy sources,gas for generator propane  solar batteries deisel for truck I dont know if I want all that. I do understand mileage is better and climbing mts etc but Im not convinced for me

I wouldn't recommend getting a diesel unless your RV is so large there's no alternative.

I tow a 29 ft. Sunnybrook trailer with a Ford Powerstroke Diesel pickup, and the truth is the gas V-10 engine would tow it just as well.  The trick is not to get a truck that is just barely able to handle your trailer, but to get more truck than you need.  No one has ever complained about having too much truck.

Find the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) for the trailer you're interested in, then choose a truck and engine combination that gives you at least a 20% cushion above that.  For example, if your trailer has a 8000 lb. GVWR choose a truck that can tow a 10,000 lb. trailer. Not loading the truck to it's rated maximum gives you more power, better braking and handling and a more pleasant towing experience.

Ford's Towing Guide https://www.fleet.ford.com/towing-guides/ is a good place to start.  Similar towing guides are available from Chevrolet, Ram, etc. but Ford's is the most comprehensive.

Why would you want a gas engine instead of a diesel?  As others have noted, modern gas engines like the Ford V-10 can last for 150,000  or 200,000 miles or more, about as long as the medium duty diesels you'll find in a pickup truck.  You just have to downshift and let it rev up when you need extra power to climb a hill, etc.  Ford's new V-8 engine that will replace the V-10 in 2020 promises diesel-like low end power and I'm looking forward to see if it will be a suitable replacement for my current truck.

Modern diesels aren't the simple, reliable engines of old - they're loaded down with expensive high maintenance emission control equipment like DPF filters, exhaust gas recirculation, etc..

Everything about a diesel is more expensive.  They cost more up front.  You have to buy DEF fluid for the exhaust filters and do regular filter maintenance.  Even something as simple as an oil and filter change costs more - diesels hold 2-3 times more oil than gas engines and their oil and fuel filters are more expensive.

Finally, diesel fuel is messy and smelly.  It doesn't evaporate like gasoline when it's spilled and it will get tracked into your truck or RV.  Unless you wear rubber gloves, it's smell will linger on your hands for quite a while after fueling.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 02:48:52 PM by Lou Schneider »

WILDEBILL308

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #24 on: November 18, 2019, 03:33:34 PM »
Thank you for your input Issac and wild Bill I do watch loloho the site you suggested and the couple are very informative I live in ft lauderdale area and have been to ft myers to airstream dealers so pretty much know what I want just truck add ons Im indecisive about Will be buying a truck after first of year I know all you guys love your diesel trucks but Im not sure about that Too many energy sources,gas for generator propane  solar batteries deisel for truck I dont know if I want all that. I do understand mileage is better and climbing mts etc but Im not convinced for me
The reason "you guys love your diesel trucks" is they allow you to tow with a greater margin of safety and milage. They also have better resale. Oneouther benifit of driving a diesel towing a trailer is you can use the truck lanes to get diesel. I have found it much much easier than most gas pumps.
 "Too many energy sources,gas for generator propane  solar batteries diesel for truck I don't know if I want all that" You are entering a transition to a new life style. You are going to find many things that you will have to adjust to and learn different skills and abilities. You might as well start with the best tools and equipment for the job.
I can help you with questions about your outher energy sources.
Why not reach out to loloho they may be able to answer questions you have about towing a airstream.
Bill
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Larry N.

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #25 on: November 18, 2019, 03:41:11 PM »
Quote
Ford's new V-8 engine that will replace the V-10 in 2020 promises diesel-like low end power and I'm looking forward to see if it will be a suitable replacement for my current truck.
Sounds interesting. The old gasoline engines that big trucks used many years ago were long stroke and low RPM engines in the same general category as diesels tend to be, which is a lot of what gives the diesels the hi torque at low RPM, so if they have a new low RPM V-8, perhaps it'll work out that way. Of course the diesels still get better mileage, but power/torque can be close to the same with either.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

Isaac-1

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #26 on: November 18, 2019, 03:58:47 PM »
One other advantage of diesels is that being turbo charged they don't loose performance with altitude nearly as much as typical gasoline engines do.

Take for example my 8.1L in my motorhome, at sea level it makes 340HP, but rough calculations say NA gasoline engines loose 3% per thousand feet of elevation, so it will be down to 255HP going over an 8,300 ft pass.

By comparison a turbo diesel engine will loose only 1 to 1.5% per thousand feet of altitude, so 1/3 to 1/2 the HP loss of a gas engine, with newer turbo designs perhaps being even lower..
2002 Safari Trek 2830

Lou Schneider

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #27 on: November 18, 2019, 04:24:36 PM »
Of course the diesels still get better mileage, but power/torque can be close to the same with either.
Diesel fuel has 18% more BTUs per gallon, so a gas engine getting 10 MPG vs. a diesel getting 12 MPG are equally efficient.

Cost per mile is not as much of a factor now that ultra low sulfur diesel fuel costs the same or even more than gasoline in many places.

And with oil and filter changes costing twice as much for diesel vs. gas engines the difference in operating cost is further narrowed.
 
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 04:27:04 PM by Lou Schneider »

Lynx0849

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #28 on: November 19, 2019, 06:09:04 PM »
Diesel fuel has 18% more BTUs per gallon, so a gas engine getting 10 MPG vs. a diesel getting 12 MPG are equally efficient.

Cost per mile is not as much of a factor now that ultra low sulfur diesel fuel costs the same or even more than gasoline in many places.

And with oil and filter changes costing twice as much for diesel vs. gas engines the difference in operating cost is further narrowed.

While there are more maintenance items on a diesel, the intervals are longer.
I put in DEF about every 3000 miles. Oil & filter every 15000 miles and fuel filters at 10000 miles.
Cost per mile not so different.

My fuel mileage with my 1 ton diesel is so much better than my old V8 gasser (1/2 ton).
Rob & Deryl, Nettle & Tigger
Clyde, a 2015 RAM 3500 Cummins Longhorn SRW w/ARE cap
14í V nose utility trailer as mini toy hauler (for now)
A Grand Design 337RLS in the near future. 😁
N1ICB (Nursing 1 Ice Cold Beer)
N1SPA (up to my neck in hot water, as always)

Debra17

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Re: RV travel alone
« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2019, 12:41:45 PM »
Lacey, welcome to the forum!  I am a solo full timer since June 2017. I have a small Northwood Nash 17k travel trailer. One reason I wanted a smaller trailer is because I planned to disperse camp most of the time. I had never owned a RV before and never towed a travel trailer. I didnít find it that difficult to get the hang of it just go slow and get out and look as much as you need to. My truck came with a backup camera. However about a year ago it quit working. I found that I was so used to backing up to the trailer to hitch up that I donít really need it. So I havenít spent the $500 or so it would cost to replace. My trailer is 22í overall length. I donít think a 30í would be any more difficult, Iím sure you can do it !!

There are several Facebook groups for women RVers. You might check them out as well, they offer a lot of info and encouragement.
Debra & Misty, the cat
2017 Northwood Nash 17K
2015 Ford F250 Lariat
http://www.debsrvtravels.com
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