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Author Topic: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?  (Read 739 times)

cerd

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Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« on: February 20, 2020, 08:42:02 AM »
I wanted to add some radiant barrier to my RV to reduce heat when we are sitting in the sun. I am going to pull off the trim to reseal them anyways, but also pulling off some of the siding to fix some delamination. Pulling it off won't be much more work than peeling it back, so I don't mind he labor.

Would I be able to apply some foil radiant barrier under the siding? I was thinking that I would be able to use some adhesive to bond it to the luan and more adhesive on top of that to bond the siding to the barrier. Has anybody done this? I would assume that newer RVs have radiant barrier or aluminum siding already. I considered replacing the fiberglass siding with aluminum, but I don't think it would be worth the cost on our old MH.

Note: I am looking at the flat barrier like shown in the link, not the bubble type.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01J6J8322/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_hQPtEbTGBSVB1
1990 Chevy G30 Gulfstream Ultra Class C
350TBI

muskoka guy

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2020, 04:44:59 PM »
Seems like a lot of work to remove all the siding. You would only be able to do the two side walls. Surely you aren't going to remove the front and rear cap. Half the heat comes in from roof. This will not help that either. I cant see the point myself, but only you know whats best for you

Utclmjmpr

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2020, 06:05:25 PM »

 All the glass in an RV is the biggest problem.>>>Dan
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You can't fix stupid,, but you can numb it with a 2X4

cerd

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2020, 05:44:26 AM »
Seems like a lot of work to remove all the siding. You would only be able to do the two side walls. Surely you aren't going to remove the front and rear cap. Half the heat comes in from roof. This will not help that either. I cant see the point myself, but only you know whats best for you
Yeah, like I said, I am already pulling off the siding to fix some delamination, so it wouldn't be much extra work to add this stuff. The front cap is aluminum and I think that's enough, but the rear is the same flexible fiberglass as the sides, so I could also do that without too much trouble. The roof is aluminum as well, so I wouldn't need to do that either. If the roof ever develops another leak, I may replace the OSB with foil faced OSB anyways. For now, there is no need for the roof. 

All the glass in an RV is the biggest problem.>>>Dan
Yup, I am addressing that with some mirror tint. I only got one window done last year and it has helped quite a bit. I still have plenty left to do the other ones.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2020, 05:46:09 AM by cerd »
1990 Chevy G30 Gulfstream Ultra Class C
350TBI

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2020, 09:05:57 AM »
Why do you think that aluminum wouldn't benefit from a radiant barrier or better insulation?  I get that polished aluminum is more reflective, but painted or anodized aluminum absorbs heat like any other non-reflective surface. Once the surface heats up, it radiates heat in all directions.  The primary benefit of a colored metal surface is that it sheds heat as quickly as it gains it, so once the sun is off it the heat dissipates quickly rather than continuing to heat the interior.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

cerd

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2020, 10:03:49 AM »
Why do you think that aluminum wouldn't benefit from a radiant barrier or better insulation?  I get that polished aluminum is more reflective, but painted or anodized aluminum absorbs heat like any other non-reflective surface. Once the surface heats up, it radiates heat in all directions.  The primary benefit of a colored metal surface is that it sheds heat as quickly as it gains it, so once the sun is off it the heat dissipates quickly rather than continuing to heat the interior.
Most radiant barriers are based on a reflective foil and my roof is pretty much that way already. If I wanted to improve it any more than it is, I would need to either build up the roof for an air gap, or remove my ceiling inside to install it in there. I don't think there would be much additional benefit because I am not willing to remove all of my fixtures and cabinets in order to install it.
1990 Chevy G30 Gulfstream Ultra Class C
350TBI

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2020, 11:00:17 AM »
I was reacting to your earlier statement

Quote
...front cap is aluminum and I think that's enough

My point was that the aluminum sections have as much need for a barrier as anyplace else. If it's too much effort, as is the case for a roof, that's a different matter.
I did a lot of research on this subject before switching from a traditional shingle roof to a metal one on our stick &brick home (which also has aluminum siding, by the way).  Learned a lot!
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

cerd

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Re: Adding Radiant Barrier under RV Siding?
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2020, 11:37:50 AM »
I was reacting to your earlier statement

My point was that the aluminum sections have as much need for a barrier as anyplace else. If it's too much effort, as is the case for a roof, that's a different matter.
I did a lot of research on this subject before switching from a traditional shingle roof to a metal one on our stick &brick home (which also has aluminum siding, by the way).  Learned a lot!
I will not pull the front cap apart, but I am currently dealing with a leak in the front window, so I could put some on inside before I put the wall panels on. I am using FRP and rubber flashing so if the windows leak in the future, it will show instead of dripping inside the wall where it will go unnoticed for days, weeks, or years.
1990 Chevy G30 Gulfstream Ultra Class C
350TBI