rvupgradestore.com Composet Products Fridge Defend
RV Life Magazine RV Park Reviews RV Trip Wizard

Author Topic: Looking to move up to Class A  (Read 2780 times)

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 70004
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2020, 10:36:12 AM »
Good advice from A Traveler.   Too many buyers get immersed in the tech stuff or worry about engine specs, but that stuff is more of a tie-breaker than a primary consideration.  My shorthand advice is to think like you are buying a house rather than a vehicle.  The house stuff has to be first and foremost, while the vehicle stuff merely needs to be adequate.  Some of the vehicle-related stuff my yield some extra satisfaction to the driver and is therefore a plus in the buy decision, but none of them are totally insufficient.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2020, 09:29:24 AM »
Well I have continued my search for a Class A, albeit virtually. I haven't seen one in person since the 2008 Monaco Camelot 36 a few weeks ago. It is a little above the top of my price range right now at $89K. Some of the most interesting possibilities are:

A 2006 40ft Monaco Camelot with a rear office configuration @ $70K.
A couple 36-38 foot Holiday Ramblers in my price range
A couple 38 ft Fleetwood Bounders (2007 & 2008) one with a rear bath and a 1/2 bath
A 2004 Monaco Diplomat 36PDQ with many owner upgrades including 960Watts of tilting solar panels, well set up for boondocking for $60K
A 2006 Fleetwood Discovery 35ft, 35K miles, one owner and stored indoors for $50K (Looks extremely well kept in pics)

I like the floor plans of the Fleetwood Bounder and the size and price of the Fleetwood Discovery. Any thoughts on any of these? I hope to be able to do some in person looking in a week or two. They vary in distance from me between 100 and 300 miles.

WILDEBILL308

  • ---
  • Posts: 2911
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2020, 01:33:34 PM »
Nice, good price but a little far away. Thanks. I'll keep looking as I am not in a big hurry.

scottydl

  • Admin assist
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 8175
  • Central IL
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2020, 03:06:25 PM »
When the economy has trouble, the value of your investments may go down temporarily, but so will the price of toys (including RV's). So I wouldn't get too hung up on that, since those factors ought to even out.

I'll keep looking as I am not in a big hurry.

And that will definitely serve you best, in terms of finding the right rig and right price for you.
Scott, wife, 3 boys... and the dog
- 2008 Forest River Wildwood 32BHDS
- 1995 Chevrolet Suburban C2500 tow vehicle
- 1994 Thor Residency motorhome... owned 2007-2012

WILDEBILL308

  • ---
  • Posts: 2911
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #35 on: March 28, 2020, 06:48:59 PM »
Nice, good price but a little far away. Thanks. I'll keep looking as I am not in a big hurry.
To find the best coach you may need to rethink how far you are willing to travel.
Bill
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #36 on: April 27, 2020, 02:08:43 PM »
Since we have been "sheltering in place" for the past 6 weeks, I have had plenty of time to look at RV ads, but little opportunity to actually look at any in person. That should change in May. I have list of 20+ possibles, with a half dozen or so that I would plan to see. As my wife and I looked at endless photos and floor plans we identified some things that we seem to both be attracted to. It appears that 90% of class A's of a given year half similar floor plans with only minor, but sometimes appealing differences. The things we rate high are: rear bathrooms, W/D's located somewhere other than bedroom, generous night stand surfaces (not interested in king bed as it appears to impact the space too much), side radiator (not many have), Sani-con, TV located somewhere convenient in the living area other than overhead (or plan would allow me to modify), large kitchen countertop or side bar for coffee maker/toaster, tile, vinyl or wood floor in lieu of carpet, reasonably new tires, an oven. I know it is unlikely to have all our wishes met, but it is a target. I am trying to limit our search for higher end models in the 2004-2008 range.

Some questions about some specific things we have seen:

1. We have seen a few National Pacificas (2005-2008) that had a great layout and decent prices. What about the general quality of these units?

2. We have been impressed by a few of the Winnebago Vectra's we have seen. They appear to be quality well designed coaches. Any negatives on these?

3. How important is a side radiator?

4. How about mileage? Too low? Too high? How does a person only put 19,000 miles on a 15 year old coach? Any concerns with ones over 100K I should be aware of?

We are presently considering Winnebago Vectras, Monaco Camelots, National Pacificas, Fleetwood Revolutions, Itasca Meridians, all 40 footers. We have seen a few 36-38 footers we like including a really nice Country Coach, but it was sold before we could see it. We should be getting out and doing some serious looking in May and June. Would like to get something by July.

sluggermike

  • ---
  • Posts: 531
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #37 on: April 27, 2020, 04:24:00 PM »
A couple years ago we made a round trip to Maine from California in out 32' motor home.  We were gone four months.  We took a lot of clothes and so we didn't have to use the laundromat more than a couple times.  I've heard RV washer dryers are not that good.  A couple things to consider is if you get an RV over 32' you may not be allowed in some state parks.  I would also think twice about getting a gasser over a diesel pusher.  You will get a little more gas mileage in a DP, but the maintenance is lot more expensive.  If you don't believe me check out how much to just change the oil.  I just spoke to a neighbor who has a fleet of diesel panel truck.  He complained about the up keep and told me he was switching over to gas.  It's just my two cents worth.  Good luck.

Lynx0849

  • ---
  • Posts: 394
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #38 on: April 27, 2020, 05:12:00 PM »
Well, about oil changes. Yes, my diesel takes twice as much oil than my old V8 but I only change it 1/3 as often so, actually less expensive in that way.

To the OP, where are you located?
I remember a member here in AZ with a country coach for sale.
Rob & Deryl, Nettle, Tigger & Mai
Clyde, a 2015 RAM 3500 Cummins Longhorn SRW w/ARE cap
14 V nose utility trailer as mini toy hauler (for now)
N1ICB (Nursing 1 Ice Cold Beer)

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #39 on: April 27, 2020, 05:21:41 PM »
I am in Cumming, GA just a bit north of Atlanta. I haven't been looking that far afield yet, but who knows for the right unit. I did buy a car from someone in Tucson one time and had it shipped to me.

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #40 on: April 27, 2020, 05:22:22 PM »
But this would be a fly and drive.


Larry N.

  • ---
  • Posts: 6695
  • Westminster, CO
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #41 on: April 27, 2020, 06:39:53 PM »
Quote
I've heard RV washer dryers are not that good.
You'll get a lot of disagreement from many folks that have them. A number of folks here have the combination units and like them. We have separate stackables and love them -- they're just as good as the ones at home, except a tad smaller.

Quote
A couple things to consider is if you get an RV over 32' you may not be allowed in some state parks.
There may be a little of that, but we've had a 34', a 45' and a 38' unit, and though the two shorter ones were a tad more maneuverable, we rarely had a problem find a place for the 45' unit either. And too short is very limiting on living space (especially in inclement weather) and in storage space (especially interior storage space).

Quote
I would also think twice about getting a gasser over a diesel pusher.
Although maintenance can be a bit higher, you also (with a gasser) give up air suspension (yes, it makes a big difference), a quieter cockpit, possible Aqua Hot (a big deal to us) and some/many other amenities, depending on the specific coach.

So if cost is your PRIMARY consideration, you probably should stick with low end gassers or even go to a small travel trailer, but otherwise need to consider all the factors that are important to YOU and balance the trade-offs that matter to YOU, keeping in mind that not everyone has the same outlook about what matters the most.

And comparing a panel truck to a DP is like night and day. In a pickup I've always done gas, but my priorities in a motorhome are different than in a pickup, PLUS most of us in a motorhome are not trying to make a profit in a business.  Add in that the longer the trip, the more we appreciate the difference in a DP.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 06:41:31 PM by Larry N. »
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #42 on: April 27, 2020, 08:56:47 PM »
1. We have seen a few National Pacificas (2005-2008) that had a great layout and decent prices. What about the general quality of these units?

I am not sure, but I think National had some fiberglass problems in those years, not their fault I think their supplier had some issues.

2. We have been impressed by a few of the Winnebago Vectra's we have seen. They appear to be quality well designed coaches. Any negatives on these?

Winnebago is hard to beat for the long term factory support, things like access to wiring diagrams, etc.  Some Winnebagos of the era had issues around the front windshields leaking and rusting out, also roof separations along the side walls in some models.  Both usually relate to lack of preventive maintenance, not really design defects, though perhaps shortcomings.  Inspect carefully.

3. How important is a side radiator?

Ask a diesel pusher guy, I opted smaller gas coach, in order to get into places with smaller campgrounds.

4. How about mileage? Too low? Too high? How does a person only put 19,000 miles on a 15 year old coach? Any concerns with ones over 100K I should be aware of?

On average most motorhomes get about 5,000 - 6,000 miles of use long term, anything much out of the window would be cause for concern, 19,000 miles on a 15 year old motorhome likely means it spent years sitting in storage, not getting ongoing preventive maintenance, which might catch up with you, dry rotted rubber parts, bearing going out, etc.  All too often people buy RV's and don't get to use them, sometimes they get sick, and don't sell with hopes they will get better one day, all too often they don't


Ike

p.s. why the Sanicon?  do you need it to dump at home or something?  I bought one of the external Sani-Con tank buddies (portable Sanicon in a plastic tool box) (price was right, used, but still new in box) about 3 years ago, and have yet to actually use the thing.
2002 Safari Trek 2830

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 70004
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #43 on: April 28, 2020, 10:11:13 AM »
Quote
1. We have seen a few National Pacificas (2005-2008) that had a great layout and decent prices. What about the general quality of these units?
A decent quality coach but not in the same ballpark as the Vectra & Camelot. Close to Discovery and Diplomat, though. I would lean toward the upper tier models because you get a lot of bang for the buck in an older high end rig. The price difference at that age is small but the features and inherent quality are still substantial. And the higher end models seem more likely to have been well-maintained.

Quote
2. We have been impressed by a few of the Winnebago Vectra's we have seen. They appear to be quality well designed coaches. Any negatives on these?
Generally a solidly built mid-to-upper range coach. In the years you seem to be considering, rusting around the windshield frame was a common Winnebago problem. Perhaps a Winnie Vectra or Itasca Horizon owner  could comment more.

Quote
3. How important is a side radiator?
It makes engine maintenance a bunch easier, so a fairly big deal if you plan much DIY service.  Otherwise, mostly of concern only if you need to have a radiator replaced or some major engine mechanical work.

Quote
4. How about mileage? Too low? Too high? How does a person only put 19,000 miles on a 15 year old coach? Any concerns with ones over 100K I should be aware of?
The state of maintenance is of more concern than mileage (within reason, of course).   Many RVs don't get used all that much, so low mileage is not rare.  6000 miles/year is typical even for frequent RV users and 3000 or less typical of weekend/vacation travelers.
A chassis with 100k miles on it likely has had or will soon need replacements for things like starter, alternator, a/c compressor, coolant water pump, fuel lift pump, front end suspension & steering, etc.  Despite the vaunted diesel longevity, those things wear out at about the same rate as they do in a car.
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

WILDEBILL308

  • ---
  • Posts: 2911
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #44 on: April 28, 2020, 12:16:22 PM »
Well you missed that Bounder.
I love this idea you need a little cramped coach with no storage just so you can get into some State and National parks. ;D So what happens when you pull up and they have no spaces available? Now you are still in a little cramped coach. What about when you go to outher places. So why do you feel the need to pay nearly as much to dry camp in some National park as to would pay for full hookups at a campground outside the park? I have been in every state in the lower 48 and 3 Canadian Provinces in a 38 foot diesel pusher and have never not been able to find a place to stay/camp.
Bill
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #45 on: April 28, 2020, 01:29:19 PM »
On a counter point, while I have only visited 15 state in my current 28 ft coach, I have been to several campgrounds where I barely fit, or only fit because I could fit into one of the remaining smaller spaces.  Ask yourself when a 100 site campground has five 40 ft sites, ten 35 ft sites, eighty-five 30 ft sites, and a hundred 25 ft sites, can you really count it as being able to accommodate almost any size motorhome?  Now sure there may be a commercial campground 10-20 miles down the road that can fit that 45 ft diesel pusher, ...

As to another argument about upkeep of higher end coaches, it is human nature to be more inclined to spend $50,000+ on a garage for a $800,000 motorhome, than for an $80,000 one.

Ike

p.s. see example photo, this was an any port in a storm situation, or in this case sudden dense fog that lasted for 2 days, note the 5th wheel 2 sites down with the truck parked cross wise to fit.  Any closer to the road and I would worry about being hit by someone's mirror, any further back and I would have a tree limb inside the coach. (picture taken on day 2 after the fog had lifted some)
« Last Edit: April 28, 2020, 01:31:05 PM by Isaac-1 »
2002 Safari Trek 2830

WILDEBILL308

  • ---
  • Posts: 2911
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #46 on: April 28, 2020, 02:10:47 PM »
True Ike you can find small campgrounds but if you look you can find a place to stay. You may not get in if you just show up without a reservation.
My new to me coach (see sig) I am still being overly protective. It is 7 feet longer. It may  make some places tighter but I am pretty shure I will still find many places to park it. The fun thing is after you travel for a while you can develop a list of campgrounds that you like.
"As to another argument about upkeep of higher end coaches, it is human nature to be more inclined to spend $50,000+ on a garage for a $800,000 motorhome, than for an $80,000 one." Really not that good of an argument as if you can buy the $800,000 RV the garage is cheap. ;)
Bill
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #47 on: April 28, 2020, 02:35:17 PM »
Perhaps, but the argument still holds, and also tend to apply to that routine scheduled preventive maintenance, as it seems most of those people with $800,000 coaches stored in $150,000+ climate controlled garages, tend to also blindly keep up with preventive maintenance items, or rather they take it into the shop once I year to get the oil changed, and everything else that needs to be done, and don't question the $4,000 service invoice.  Either that or they park it in the garage and forget about it for a decade, in which case at least the paint is still in good shape.

Another argument for previously garage kept motorhomes, is there is a somewhat lower chance of extensive water damage, sure leaks can happen while traveling, and some of those will be causing hidden damage, but odds of a major leak going un-noticed for a prolonged period of time while in storage is much less.
2002 Safari Trek 2830

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #48 on: April 30, 2020, 09:44:16 AM »
Thanks Gary for the information. It will help as I wade through the units in my price range.

As far as size goes, we are considering anything between 36 and 40 feet. Layout and slides often make up the 4 foot difference between the units. Underside storage would seem to take the biggest hit in a 4 foot shorter model. We believe we can find what we want for between $55K and $70K. We expect to get $15-$20K for our travel trailer sometime this year. Of course we may be able to trade if we buy from a dealer. Probably won't allow anywhere near worth. But it makes it easy.

Regardless of size, I am most interested in getting a quality mfg. coach and one well cared for with up to date maintenance. Just looking at the pictures, it is amazing to see how dirty people allow there underside bays to get. I see engine compartments you could eat off of and others that look like they have spent their life on a dirt road. Things like that tell me a lot about the care given by the owner.

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 70004
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #49 on: April 30, 2020, 11:35:20 AM »
Quote
Of course we may be able to trade if we buy from a dealer. Probably won't allow anywhere near worth.

What it is worth to a dealer is strictly the wholesale value, so probably much less than what you would like it to be.  The dealer will add to it whatever discount he is willing to offer and thus make it look higher, but don't be fooled.   It's not more than wholesale because you would have received the same discount on a no-trade deal.  Wholesale on an RV is around 60% of the retail value, but retail can vary with season, region, local brand or type preferences, etc.
If you can swing it, now would be a good time to buy a no-trade deal and keep your old RV to sell privately when the economy recovers somewhat,
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #50 on: April 30, 2020, 12:22:05 PM »
Also don't confuse clean due to someone spending $750 to a detailer that cleaned the RV inside and out, and blasted the engine with a steam cleaner, with one that was well maintained all its life.  This goes for dealers too, sales presentation is important, let me give an example, using 2 used RV dealers in east Texas.

PPL in Houston, very big mostly consignment dealer,  RV's are brought in, put on the lot with no discernible maintenance, I spent an afternoon there killing time while I was in Houston on other business a couple of years ago.  RV's a packed in shoulder to shoulder on the lot, with no power to any of them, so close together it is hard to get an exterior overview, with so many of the motorhomes having damaged and wobbly entry steps, and loose grab handles I took to stepping past the bottom step, and not using the grab handle in order to avoid a potential fall.  Inside it was no better, some had torn fabric on the seating, and other easy to address blemishes.  Cleanup, what there might have been appeared to be that someone went through with a trash bag and threw out everything that was not fastened down, and thats it.


Contrast this to Motorhomes of Texas (in Nacogdoches about 140 miles north of Houston), where most if not all RV's are plugged into power, with their air conditioners running, lights on, etc. (MOT specializes in used mid to upper end motorhomes), many of them spaced 15-20 feet apart so easy to walk around.  As to the interiors, of the few I saw while dropping in there, all were spotless, and well staged.  Fake bowl of fruit on the counter top, throw pillows on the sofa, silk robe draped across the bed, this is not to say they were all in perfect shape, just that someone had taken a little time on presentation, even the bathroom fixtures were spotless.  I wish I knew how they managed to get all the hard water stains off the glass shower surrounds,...
2002 Safari Trek 2830

WILDEBILL308

  • ---
  • Posts: 2911
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #51 on: April 30, 2020, 03:03:10 PM »
Isaac-1, I haven't been to the PPL site in Houston so I can't comment on that location. However I do have some hands on experience dealing with the lot in Cleburne Texas. Go look at the Bounder that the OP missed. Yes you can pay them to clean up the outside and inside of your rig. Yes many people don't do this. The outherpart you didn't know about or didn't mention is that when you buy a RV they go completely through it and fix anything not working.
I have been to MOT many times. Yes they spend more on cleaning and staging That cost money. Let's compare a couple of couches. I chose these because they are basically the same coach.
 https://www.motorhomesoftexas.com/Pre-owned-Inventory-2008-Newmar-Motorhome-Mountain-Aire-4528-Mountain-Aire-8468470?ref=list
Someplace you didn't mention and  I have hands on experiance with is National Indore RV Centers.
https://www.nirvc.com/Sales/Inventory/3191A
Ok I was drawn to these coaches because I bought a 2008 Newmar Mountain Aire 2023 From NIRVC just before all the current mess started. ;D
  GT928   should check out these sites as I did see a couple nice CC  and he might find a nice Fortravel.
The best way to know if a RV is a good buy is to have it checked out by a certified inspector. He works for you.

Bill


« Last Edit: April 30, 2020, 03:07:15 PM by WILDEBILL308 »
2008 Newmar Mountain Aire
450 HP ISM Cummins
Allison 4000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #52 on: April 30, 2020, 04:38:16 PM »
I have not personally been to an NIRVC location, but by all accounts they are a good dealership, though one can note a difference in level of staging between your two examples, note the water spots on the shower door, the lack of the small touches, like plates on the table, and soap dispensers in the bathroom.   As to price difference without a lot more information it is hard to read too much into it, by that I mean how negotiable is the price as each dealer, are the coaches generally in the same condition, which as you say you really need an independent inspection to ascertain,...

Note my mention of MOT should in no way be seen as an endorsement of them, just an observation of how much staging and cleaning can go towards perception of overall condition, the key word there being perception.

Imagine having 2 identical 2005 Nicebrand model XYZ coaches, one being sold at PPL, left to sit as it was brought in except for a quick clean out and shoehorned into a space on the lot with no power, the other being staged at MOT, with power connected and air conditioner running on a hot summer day, viewed back to back on the same day in either order, even at a higher price I suspect many people would feel the one at MOT was superior.

p.s. I also have to give it to MOT vs PPL on the overall customer experience

For PPL I had went by to shop in the parts store, I needed a new toilet for my coach and wanted compare models in person vs blindly ordering online, while there I had time to kill that day so spent a few hours walking the lot.  Before being allowed on the lot I had to go to a reception desk, fill out a contact information form (I still get flyers from them in the mail about once a week, and promo emails even more often), then a salesman escorted me to the door to the fenced RV lot, and said go look, my name is Jason)

For MOT I was there to look at one specific coach for a fellow forum member to give them an impartial casual 15 minute walk through 3rd party view (I was driving by within a mile of MOT anyway, so it was not out of my way, so it made a nice break after 120 or so miles of driving).  At MOT there was no form to fill out, the reception area was maybe a bit nicer, the receptionist asked if they could help, I told them what I was up to, she paged the salesman that the forum member had been dealing with, he came out, said he was working with another customer right then, but gave me the keys to the $75,000 (asking price) used coach that was on their  overflow lot across the highway, and said to bring the keys back when I was done.  I went over spent some time looking around, snapped a few photos for the forum member of things not showing or not showing well in the promo photos (missing wide view side mirror, some signs of wood rot at the edge of the carpet in the slide, ...) brought the keys back, then while there looked at a few coaches on the main lot, all with no sales pressure, and even had a guy ask if I was selling my coach which I parked in their parking lot while I was looking.

Overall not a BIG differences, but there were some little things that made MOT feel friendlier, lower pressure, etc.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2020, 04:52:37 PM by Isaac-1 »
2002 Safari Trek 2830

Isaac-1

  • ---
  • Posts: 3206
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #53 on: May 03, 2020, 04:22:41 PM »
I must admit I was just guilty of giving bad information on an  old work truck that the family business had for sale yesterday.  We were down to the last 2 of a small fleet of delivery trucks we have been selling off after shutting down the business a few years ago.  (Now down to 1) when they guy called to inquire about them he asked if they were automatic or manual transmissions, I told him that we only had 1 automatic transmission truck of that model, and I thought it had already sold.  I was wrong, both of the ones that were left were automatics, and all the manual transmission trucks had sold (1999 International 4700's).   Though it all ended well as he bought one of them anyway, now just one left to get rid of.
2002 Safari Trek 2830

billwild

  • ---
  • Posts: 833
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #54 on: May 04, 2020, 12:25:54 PM »
We as well had no problems at all finding camp grounds that could fit our 40'er. Another consideration could be towing a car behind. You do not unhook at the campsite to go for groceries with a class A.  I was fortunate to find basically all of my towing needs on EBay:  tow bar, cables, Brake Buddy, etc., all used and in great shape. Saved a lot of money.


Bill
2005 Carriage Cameo 5th. wheeler
2005 Holiday Rambler Endeavor
2004 Honda CRV

Sweetsurrender

  • ---
  • Posts: 47
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #55 on: May 04, 2020, 12:52:44 PM »
If I ever change to a class A, this thread will be my go to!!

In the meantime, one item that I didn't see mentioned is the need for a toad with this new motorhome. Just a practical thought here. There is a good chance that whatever autos you already have are not towable 4 down. With any luck this isn't true, but the towables list is getting shorter all the time.  If you don't have one towable 4 down, a trailer is always an option. In our case, we didn't want to deal with a trailer, so had to find a towable vehicle we actually like and traded. Fun fact, it was an additional investment.😒

Best of luck with your search, it seems you have a pretty good idea of what you want, which should make it easy.  Hopefully soon we will be on the other side of this pandemic and all rolling merrily along again.

Happy trails!!
2019  29ft. Jayco Greyhawk
2017 Jeep Cherokee
Us and 2 dogs from
Henderson, Nevada

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #56 on: May 04, 2020, 04:11:05 PM »
My wife and I have not ruled out the 40 foot units, but are first looking further into options in the 35-36 foot range. To that end we have found a few with plans she likes. Both Itasca and Winnebago (Horizon, Journey) have some well thought out plans in that range. We are looking at a couple Journey's 34H & 36G, Itasca's 34TG & 36RD, and a Safari Simba 36PDQ. Any thoughts on these choices? We are patient, but getting anxious to move forward. If one of these does not work out, we have already identified 3 or 4 40's that should be available at a decent price. We are looking at shorter ones first because they sell much quicker.

Ernie n Tara

  • ---
  • Posts: 3940
  • Life is Good - Together
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #57 on: May 05, 2020, 05:40:51 AM »
Not to beat a dead horse, but we have full timed in a Journey 34y for nearly ten years now. It works well and if we were to replace it, it would be with the same model (as nearly as possible).

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
2020 Jeep Gladiator - Pun'kin
2012 Jeep Rubicon - Dozer (orange - kinda)- Sold
2006 Jeep Wrangler

GT928

  • ---
  • Posts: 44
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #58 on: May 05, 2020, 07:20:44 AM »
Thanks Ernie. I think we would enjoy the Journey. The only thing I am concerned about is the towing capacity. My Grand Cherokee Overland is 4965 lbs. curb weight. Not sure if that includes a tank of gas, oil, etc. One of the units apparently has a 5000 lb trailer hitch. What is the towing capacity of your Journey?

Larry N.

  • ---
  • Posts: 6695
  • Westminster, CO
Re: Looking to move up to Class A
« Reply #59 on: May 05, 2020, 07:29:45 AM »
Most DPs have around 10,000 lbs tow capacity, some even more. My Newmar Ventana 38' has 10,000.
Larry and Mary Ann N.
2016 Newmar Ventana 3709 -ISB6.7 XT 360HP
2015 Wrangler Sahara Unlimited toad
Formerly: Trailmanor 2720SL, Bounder, Beaver
  de N8GGG