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Author Topic: fifth wheel slider  (Read 3634 times)

newguy

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fifth wheel slider
« on: June 23, 2005, 10:55:47 PM »
Am I in the right area to ask about slider(s) and extensions?

Tom

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2005, 10:57:09 PM »
This is a good place to ask about them.
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

newguy

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2005, 11:12:25 PM »
I have a 1999 F250SD SB. I am looking at getting a 5er, especially since the last go around (see introduction). I have pulled several fifth wheel trailers (utility, car, etc.) in the past all of course with LB P/U's. Now that I am in the market, things have changed dramatically from the Reese 21K of day's past. I have looked at everything from the superglide to Hi-Jacker and have scratched my head for awhile and would like some help in picking the right slider. I am leaning toward the Reese 16k round tube slider, but do I really need dual pivot? I don't want to get a slider with a slide pin bar. Much prefer the dual jaw system. Comments are needed to help decide.

newguy

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2005, 08:29:38 AM »
Does anybody have a 16K round tube slider? Pros and Cons. Do I need to get a pin box extension too? What all, other than weight is a major factor with the new 5er sliders? First time with a SB, don't want to hurt anything.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2005, 08:35:47 AM »
Quote
but do I really need dual pivot?

I guess "need" is subjective, but I would recommend it both for passenger comfort and to help keep your truck's rear wheels firmly in contact with the ground.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

newguy

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2005, 07:20:28 PM »
Looking at a 27 Nash. Does the slider eliminate the need for a pin box extension? Looks like the 5er king pin is already in front of the leading edge. Is there a better hitch for the money? Reese 16K dual pivot round tube slider is what I am looking at. Can't afford the superslide and it looks like it has some hookup limitations.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2005, 08:58:30 AM »
Is your Ford a short or long bed?  With a long bed, you don't need to worry about it.

An "extended" pin box normally projects around 12-16 inches from the front cap, with the pin itself about 9-12 inches out. Is the standard Nash kingpin mount that far out?
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

newguy

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2005, 10:30:19 AM »
It is a short bed here is a pic of the 5er. The King pin is out front, but I don't know exactly how far. I am going to look at it later today, will take my tape with me. How far out is safe?

newguy

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2005, 04:39:38 PM »
OK I have measured the trailer, and the king pin clears the forward most point of the bulkhead by 8 inches. So with that 8 inches plus the slider am I going to need the extender? Am I going to be spending a ton of time sliding my hitch around? You know, getting fuel, etc.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: fifth wheel slider
« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2005, 07:30:58 AM »
From the picture it appears  you already have an extended pin box, though there might possibly be a longer extension available if really needed.

Please understand that the sliding feature of the hitch is used only when backing up and even then is needed only when turning very sharply, probably in excess of 75 degrees.  Therefore it is unlikely to be something you use when fueling or other routine situations.  You probably don't need a slider at all, but most new trailer owners fell more comfortable with it because they are inexpereinced in backing a fifth wheel and are afraid of a mistake.   And the sliding hitch can be a big advantage when backing into a very tight spot where you really do have to turn very sharply.  But mostly, if you have turned the trailer at an angle of more than 60 degrees to the truck, you probably should pull out and re-align your approach anyway.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

 

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