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Author Topic: question  (Read 3028 times)

ski

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question
« on: July 04, 2005, 02:19:37 AM »
Hi, I'm totally new to this whole RV thing as I decided to live in one for construction work away from my home and wife. I purchased rather hastilly and was told that mine was an all season camper. Ihave now been crawling under it at a park about 750 miles from the dealer and found some troubling things. It seems that there are waterlines that rut towrd the kitchen and water heater that are totally exposed outside the camper (underneath). When I get back Tuesday I will try to find out if they are water or possibly gas lines (there shouldn't be 2??). Also there are only a few plastic panels underneath the camper and the rest is a heavy cloth like material stapled to the frame. Peaking throug a hole I could not detect any insulation. I am pretty sure of my stupidity or gullability, but did I get ripped and can I still skirt it and do some things to make it through winters? Thanks.

Brad
 

Carl L

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Re: question
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2005, 12:41:55 PM »
Hi, I'm totally new to this whole RV thing as I decided to live in one for construction work away from my home and wife. I purchased rather hastilly and was told that mine was an all season camper. Ihave now been crawling under it at a park about 750 miles from the dealer and found some troubling things. It seems that there are waterlines that rut towrd the kitchen and water heater that are totally exposed outside the camper (underneath). When I get back Tuesday I will try to find out if they are water or possibly gas lines (there shouldn't be 2??). Also there are only a few plastic panels underneath the camper and the rest is a heavy cloth like material stapled to the frame. Peaking throug a hole I could not detect any insulation. I am pretty sure of my stupidity or gullability, but did I get ripped and can I still skirt it and do some things to make it through winters? Thanks.

Brad
 

I suspect those lines are gas lines -- particularly if they are rigid steel lines.   Even on vacation trailers, water lines tend to be plastic, including flexible plastic, and are routed inside the body of the trailer.   However, a check to verify this cannot hurt.
Carl L/LA   [Forum Staff]  KI6SEZ

Prowler 23LV TT pulled by a '95 Ford Bronco

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: question
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2005, 01:25:35 PM »
Never believe anything an Rv salesman tells you.  As a group, they make used car salesmen look good.

What make and model RV is it? Maybe somebody here knows something about it.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

ski

  • Posts: 4
Re: question
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2005, 09:39:46 AM »
It is a 94 Challenger. Sorry for the late reply, I am only at computer on weekends away from the job.
Ski

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: question
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2005, 04:52:22 PM »
Sorry, I'm not familiar with the brand. However, the type of construction you describe is common on lower-end models in the late 80's and early 1990's.  I would not be  at all surprised if there is little insulation, exposed water lines, etc.  Probably no dual pane glass either.

Sure, you can use any Rv year around, but most of them won't be very comfortable and will take a fair amount of effort to sustain in the winter months.  Only a few trailers are really designed to be "all season" and they are generally the high-end models. 

 I suspect the salesman took advantage of your inexperience. 
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL