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Author Topic: refridgerator question  (Read 4185 times)

tomkelley80926

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refridgerator question
« on: April 28, 2008, 12:52:23 PM »
i dont know why im asking this question,it even sound stupid to me.i have an older slide in truck camper.when i mean old i mean 1969,it a riveria it was owned by the same family all these years,good shape.anyway i dont think the fridge works,so i was thinking about replacing it.here is where it gets wierd,there is a toiler room with a toilet,it doesnt have a holding tank.so i wouldne be able to use it much if at all.so i was thinking about taking the toilet out fixing the hole and taking the door off and putting a small fridge in there,i dont mean a 4.3 cubic ft im talking one you would find in an apartment full size.the camper does have 110,is this too much? i guess im in a way not wanting to replace the fridge with a new one they seem exspensive.

John From Detroit

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Re: refridgerator question
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2008, 02:54:27 PM »
Well... First:

Are you sure there is no holding tank and never was one? (Where does it go)  Having a toilet "on board" even if you have to be hooked to the park sewer (like a park model trailer) can be a very good thing when it's raining by the buckets and you really need to.. You know.

Second, There are now a few options on a refrigerator

Option one, A traditional "Absorption" unit (Standard RV- Fridge)   I'm Sure you have priced those  Run on propane or 120 volt (Some add 12 volt, not many) require around 350 watts when running on electric (NOTE that is not an exact number)

Option Two: Some new technology compressor jobs.. Run on 12 volt (some run on 120 with a built in converter) take aroudn 35-40 watts of power.. Work surprisingly well.. I have a chest freezer that uses this technology   one caution though  EXPENSIVE

Norcold makes these units,

Three, Traditional HOME TYPE fridge.. You can get small 120 volt compressor fridges designed for office or hotel/dorm room these work very well, need about 100 watts running, and around 500 watts starting, traditional compressor jobs..  Been some years since I purchased one but again I suspect you have looked at price tags

Motors like true sine wave inverters should you try to run it off battery when going down the road however... If you plug it in a day or two before you are ready to leave, get it good and cold, then put a packing strap around it before you climb into the truck, it's good for six to 10 hours (Depending on how new and the model) without power DOOR CLOSED

Do not forget to tie the door closed though

I had a small trailer so I took some nylon straps and rigged it so they formed a handle I could lift it in and out of the trailer with, Set it on a pad next to the trailer   Worked great.. Very great.  Last time I saw it the folks who are using it now were very happy with it,  They pack it, cold, drive 200 miles, plug in.. Same as I did :)
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

tomkelley80926

  • Posts: 4
Re: refridgerator question
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2008, 03:13:51 PM »
the question whether i was sure there was no holding tank is yes the pipe goes all the way out,there is a place that i could put one.it wouldnt be a big one.not sure what sizes they come in. i checked out the dorm size fridges they run about 150 for the size i would like to have,the one i was thinking about putting in there is about 5 ft tall.

John From Detroit

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  • Posts: 19792
  • ^My New Home^
    • Diabetics Forum
Re: refridgerator question
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2008, 06:53:33 PM »
Sounds like the toilet might be a "park" model

I'd keep the toilet and hook up to a sewer at the campsite... Well.... Let me tell you of one of my first trips with the class A.

Pulled in, set up, hooked up decided I needed a small table to put my laptop on for navigation.

Got out the wood, got out the saw... Got out the tape measure,, Took a look at the sky, put tape and saw away, and went inside the RV... As I opened the door the rain started... Drip.... Drip.. Click of door latching.... SPLOOSH,, Suddenly it looked like some of those RV's I've seen photos of being towed out of the lake (It was raining that hard, we were no where near the lake)

Now... That evening when I needed to sit a spell... I was real glad to have it indoors.


I'd go with the dorm fridge,,, Just make sure you can lock the door closed.  I used a packing strap around it, there are some nice latches you can get at RV stores too (don't want it coming open when you turn a corner)
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

Alaskansnowbirds

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Re: refridgerator question
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2008, 08:11:25 PM »
Sounds like the toilet you have is a recirculating type. The pipe is only used to empty it. You're right, there isn't a holding tank per say. Think of a toilet on an airplane.

Here is one example.
Don & Peg
Alaska/Arizona
Currently located here.
Weather at Camp Verde, AZ.

PancakeBill

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Re: refridgerator question
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2008, 04:49:35 PM »
Why not just replace rv fridge with dorm fridge, leave toilet alone.  The recirc toilet has a pump that runs the blue water to flush it.  Everything stored in a integral tank.  If yours is essentially just attached to a pipe, then it can only be used hooked up.  I had one of those in a rig back in the 70's, and with this being a 1969 unit, it is possible you have the same. 
Don't use first, connect later. 
Bill & Jolene W & Koda

Old Faithful, Yellowstone Association Bookstore
1997 Southwind 35P
Toads: 1997 Honda Accord & 1986 Westfalia
FMCA F-401354
1995 OMI Dobro F-60
WA1RI

 

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