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Author Topic: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08  (Read 193830 times)

Jim Godward

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #390 on: September 02, 2008, 11:34:48 PM »
On our way home from Portland/Olympia, Pat complained that the exhause brake was on.  I checked the indicator, the RPMs, torque on the VMS and anything else I could check.  Then I looked out the window and realized she was going up hill.  I don't think she ever believed me.  This was in the pass east of Seattle on I-90.  It will fool you as the road is up but the surrounding land gives the impression that you are going down.  VBG
Jim
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Luca1369

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #391 on: September 03, 2008, 06:47:01 AM »
There's a spot like that on a small, mountain road on the northwestern shore of the island of Trinidad, as well as one here in Georgia, just north of Atlanta, in a small town called Cumming.

The gravity road in Cumming begins where two large, old oak trees spread their limbs over the narrow, two-lane country road.  To experience it you must drive your car to the bottom of the "hill" and place it in neutral with the engine off and it mysteriously rolls back "uphill" for a short distance.  Locals tell you that the car is being pushed backwards by the ghosts of slaves that were once hung from the oak trees at the top of the hill.  People have reported experiencing this at night and then driving to a well-lit gas station to notice the appearance of "hand prints" on their hoods.  I've tried this "gravity road" several times.  You actually do roll back "uphill" a bit, but I've never had hand prints appear on my hood.

Steve
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Jim Dick

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #392 on: September 03, 2008, 06:54:56 AM »
There is also a gravity hill near the State capital in SLC.  Another place that will give the impression of going down hill when you are actually going up hill or visa versa is driving through the Wind River Canyon in Wyoming.

Come on Ron, I know we were going downhill in Wind River Canyon!!! ;D The one that really got me was I70 east heading for Moab. At one point I was sure I would need the exhaust brake so I turned it on while in cruise. Nothing happened. I looked at the small stream next to the highway and it was flowing in our direction. I finally checked the altitude on the GPS. We were actually going uphill!!! Thankfully, Terry Brewer confirmed my feelings as it happened to him as well. :)
Jim

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Ron

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #393 on: September 03, 2008, 09:03:29 AM »
Come on Ron, I know we were going downhill in Wind River Canyon!!! ;D

I have had to point out to more than one which side of the dam the resivoir is on at the bottom of Wind River canyon.  For a lot of folks they feel they are going down hill when traveling South through the canyon. 
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ArdraF

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #394 on: September 03, 2008, 04:32:04 PM »
Quote
I love being retired

Betty, you know you're having a heck of a lot more fun than they are!  ;)

Jerry and I simultarneously said, "Leave it to Terry to take a photo of the GPS."  Now why didn't we think of that when we were there?  Yep, tourists R us!

ArdraF
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JerArdra

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #395 on: September 03, 2008, 05:25:26 PM »
Just look at your Turbo Boost and you'll know it's up hill.

JerryF
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #396 on: September 03, 2008, 07:38:20 PM »
September 3,  2008   Saint John, New Brunswick,  Rockwood Campground

We moved  100 miles south today  to Saint John and ended up in a wonderful campground in that it has huge spaces with clear views of southern skies.  We trotted off to lunch at the restaurant overlooking the Reversing Falls.  The Bay of Fundy is said to have it’s anchor here.  We watched a video on the geography of the area and how the gravitational pull of the  moon cause this bulge in the water that forms the tides.  We could see the lovely  enclosed  power boat cruises on the water below our restaurant view.  We also saw the crazy folk in the jet boats  zipping through the rapids below.  Guess what we are going to do in the morning?  We were told we were guaranteed to get soaking wet.  Oh Boy. 

 This is a very  interesting city  with many  old Victorian style mansions and brightly colored buildings mixed with new buildings.The crowds around town today were  hefty as there were 3 large cruise ships in the harbor today.   I picked up information in the visitor center and despite being a very tired tourist, I saw dozens of things that were of interest to me.  We may stay here longer than planned.  It  rained all afternoon so I had a chance to read all the tour books.  I will be fixing meals in motor home as much as possible to use up the items we will not be able to take back into the USA. 
Betty Brewer

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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #397 on: September 04, 2008, 07:14:06 PM »
September 4,  2008   Saint John, New Brunswick   Reversing Falls

It was a bright blue sky day with  a high of around 70.  Just perfect for our planned Jet Boat ride on the reversing falls which gave us a very up close and personal look at the power of the tides and an appreciation for the amount of water going in first one direction, then flatten (slack tide)  and  then go  out in the other.  Terry and I donned our raingear, jackets and pants and rubber shoes from our Alaska wardrobe.  Russ was to be the photographer.  We reported at  10:50 am and took photos of the rapids out front.  Yesterday when we were there the tide was coming in and water somewhat calm.  NOT so today, tide was retreating so the St John River was rushing in and causing big rapids and whirlpools and waves and moving so terribly fast.  I was having some hesitation but we had already paid for the  trip and the crowds were gone.  There  were  only two other  women  with us on the jet  boat.  We were advised to put on their rain gear and remove our watches, keys, glasses and  shoes.  Yep, even though our shoes were rubber we were advised to remove them.  We were told we would get wet.  So be it.  Our jet boat Captain gave us a lesson on the tides and advised us of the safety standards. He is from Quebec, had a very strong French accent and later I learned  just how sadistic he  could be.   We walked down the gang plank to our front row seat on the boat.  I was kinda hoping we could sit in the second row and be sheltered a bit from the water spray but no… we got front row seats.    A jet boat is very smooth, does not make a lot of noise but moves quickly and turns on a dime.  Mark the driver ( and owner of company)  took us out directly into the thrashing current, made a sharp circular turn into a  wave  and we were swamped,  Not splashed, not wet a little but completely drenched to the bone.  Water came in my ears, in my nose and down my neck.  So much for water proof clothing.  Mark looked back at his passengers and grinned an evil grin.  We were all laughing.  He asked us if we knew what the black birds nearby were. I said they looked like cormorants to us but he said they were vultures and laughed  and grinned an evil grin.  He was a kick.  He talked to us about the whirlpools and then let us experience them.  He took us over the rapids again and again and then out to the calm river.  He assured us there were no rocks creating these rapids but just the volumes of waters trying to levelize themselves to the incoming tides.  Each trip over the rapids created this wave that reminded me of swimming in large surf  in the ocean and having a huge wave crash right on your head.  When it was over I  hobbled up the gang plank, sat down for a while and could finally relax enough to say I enjoyed this event.  “You will get wet “ is an understatement.  What a memory making experience! 
We drove back to motor home to change into dry clothes and catch a city bus tour but that shall be part 2 of today’s story.
Betty Brewer

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Wendy

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #398 on: September 04, 2008, 08:05:15 PM »
I wouldn't have believed it possible, but you look wetter than you did on the Colorado whitewater rafting trip out of Moab. I can only hope that you weren't as cold !!!

Hooray for Russ for taking the pictures !

Wendy
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rhmahoney

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #399 on: September 04, 2008, 08:38:19 PM »
My wonderful Maritime trip is fast coming to a close :-(

I will depart Canada on Monday the 8th.

Who is still in New England? I plan on seeing a few favorite places in Maine and then to NY NY to visit a SCUBA buddie, Chet Parks in PA, and a high school friend in Washington DC and then back to Iowa by the first of Oct.

I will miss the Brewers who are wonderful traveling companions. I also will miss the delightful blogging by Betty...now I gotta struggle to do it myself!

Random notes.
Mosquitos were bad in PEI and Shediac but are rare here in St John. The attendant at the CG says it is due to the cold water of the bay of Funday keeping temps 10 degrees colder. Whatever, i am not complaining.

Today after getting pictures of the jet boat excursion, I went downtown to take a chance on a Mexican restaurant...couldn't find it! Went by where it was supposed to be 3 times. Saw a sign a block away pointing towards where it should be, but the store itself had no signage. Oh, well, went to the city market (a long hall with meat, fish, vegetable vendors and ready to eat vendors) which is a small version of the big ones like Pike mkt in Seattle.

This is an old old town with streets laid out over cow paths and has much traffic, complicated by construction...in other words -normal. I hate that!

Great weather today, upper 60s and sunny. DId a drive along the Fundy shore N of town. Tomorrow we will explore to the south which has more coves and fishing villages.
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ArdraF

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #400 on: September 05, 2008, 12:34:16 PM »
Russ, thanks so much for photographing "The Drenching" so we have a permanent record and collective memory.  I've never seen either of the Brewers that wet!  ;D

ArdraF

ArdraF
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #401 on: September 05, 2008, 02:37:11 PM »
I wouldn't have believed it possible, but you look wetter than you did on the Colorado whitewater rafting trip out of Moab. I can only hope that you weren't as cold !!!

Wendy,

Fortunately it was not cold at all.  The first wash of water across my bare feet in the bottom of the boat took my breath away but after that  even the waves of water over the boat did not feel as cold as it felt wet.  And YES I was considerably more wet that Colorado River trip. Ears are still full of water.

Tom,
While the water moved swiftly, this was not nearly as dangerous as the Lower Kern River  in high water season.  I did show them my scar and told them about that adventure and they assurred me nothing like that could happen.  The rapids on Kern are filled with massive boulders that caused our raft to flip.  But all of that said it will be a while  before Terry gets me into another thrill ride.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2008, 03:44:11 PM by Betty Brewer »
Betty Brewer

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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #402 on: September 06, 2008, 10:33:38 AM »
September 5, 2008 St Andrews and St Stevens Side Trips

 

Today was another bright sunny day so we headed south of Saint John to visit St Stevens. Now I am one of those people who can typically live their whole life without chocolate. (Chips and Salsa are another story) Well I think I had just never met the right chocolate. Our destination today, The Ganong Chocolate Museum, was at the recommendation of several friends. All I can say to them is thank you , thank you! I learned that Ganong Bros. is a Canada’s oldest candy making company and was founded in 1873.

The Museum is located in their former chocolate and candy-making factory . The museum tells the story of the history of this family owned company. The 5th generation Ganong family is still running the company. The company survived the depression and sugar rationing and is still able to compete with the big candy makers like Hershey’s and Cadbury’s. We saw videos of the factory making candy. Factory tours are no longer offered as folks with peanut allergies and insurance liabilities stopped this touring a year or so ago. The best part of this visit was that they offered all the chocolate you could eat! It was a bargain since our admission fee was only ˝ price as we had been given a 2 for 1 coupon at the visitor center. The chocolate covered almond flavored caramels were my favorite. It was hard to fit the tasting in with my Weight Watcher points. I did not get much else to eat the rest of the day but boy was it worth it. We saw sculptures of chocolate and very interesting handmade boxes. This company was the first to introduce heart shaped boxes. Some of the machines still used in production today date back to 1912. They do mail order business and you can shop online at www.ganong.com. I will be doing this for special occasions.

Since St Stephens is right on the border with Calais , we took the opportunity to see where we will be crossing the border back into the USA in a few days. I am also reading up on the food items I will not be able to bring back into USA and having meals to use up that food.

From This little town we ventured back up coast to St. Andrews, one of the oldest and loveliest resort towns in the Maritimes.( or says the tour books) This historic quaint town offered us the first clam chowder we have been able to find in a long while. Seafood chowder is the usual fare but we wanted the clam variety . It was yummy and we had a seat overlooking the bay while noticing dozens of tourists get off of the whale watching vessels. I let the guys have a seat on the town benches while I took a leisurely stroll through the shops. Many art shops offered the crafts of artists from New Brunswick. If I had not already picked up so many souvenirs I may have had to make a purchase but enough is enough. St Andrews was founded right after the American revolutionary war. Colonist who were still loyal to the King of England, picked up lock stock and barrel and moved. We were told some even took their homes down piece by piece and transported them here by barge. There are many old historic homes in this small town. Parking was free and the atmosphere festive. They have a wonderful campground out on the end of the Bay and had we known it may have been a good place to stay as we neared the border. There is lovely golf course and nice park on the water as well. Are you reading this Jeff?

Our final tourist stop was at the Huntsman Outdoorsciences Aquarium. A local fisherman found a 22 pound lobster estimated to be over 35 years old. After much city debate it was decided that this gal nicknamed Dee Dee should not be boiled but preserved in this tank for to visitors to see. The lobster fetched $1000 for the fishermen. Lobster are expensive any way you see it!  She was shy and hid behind the wall but I did capture a photo of her claw with my hand for perspective.

My passengers slept in the car as I took my turn and drove us home back to Saint John.

Betty Brewer

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Tom

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #403 on: September 06, 2008, 10:50:05 AM »
Keep 'em coming Betty. Lots of folks are following along (see above).

Apologies for the sidetrack; I'll try to get it cleaned up and moved to a separate topic.

Edit: Split and moved.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2008, 08:20:42 AM by Tom »
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

Jeff

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #404 on: September 06, 2008, 08:01:52 PM »
Betty:

Sounds good to me!

Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #405 on: September 07, 2008, 01:22:51 PM »
September 6,  2008   Saint John City Bus Tour

Today was foggy and rainy.  I did not leave the motor home all day  so I shall tell you about the  tour we took the other day.   Here at Rockwood RV Park there was a big sign with a phone number for a  2 hour  city bus tour of Saint John. ($17.00 per person) The bus picked us up right beside our motor home.  We were the only two passengers on this big bus designed for 40 passengers.  Doug our guide,  told us it has been a slow year for tourism.   He had not had any passengers on his morning trip.  He was driver and guide and was born and raised in Saint John.  His wife teaches Special Ed at the junior high and  has already started back to school.  We made 2 other stops to pick up passengers but no one was there.  I am going to give you random things I recall from this very interesting trip. 

When we drove the  car in to take the Reversing Falls trip a  few days ago we had already discovered some of the interesting and diverse areas of interest.  I liked this city right off.  It has old world charm with big city modernizations.  The traffic was typical big city and much construction in town delayed and rerouted the bus tour course.

Saint John was discovered in 1604.  It sits at the mouth of the St John River that empties into the Bay of Fundy.  In  1783 Loyalists fled the Boston area after the American Revolution and some 3,000 settlers came. In 1840 the potato famine in Ireland brought another influx of Irish .  Since then  immigrants from all nations have found a home in Saint John.  The present population is 75,000.  People work in the local industries that include a  natural gas terminal, in oil refineries, in government positions and in tourism.  Three large cruise ships were in port on our tourist day.  It sure swamps the downtown area when they emerge from their huge ships.  Irving Company is headquarter here.  KC Irving was among the 10 richest men in the world at his death, with an estimated wealth in the billions of dollars.   He was from  New Brunswick and  made his fortune by  buying companies. He had deals with Henry Ford to  sell the autos here , then he purchased the shipping lines to have them transported.  He was quite a  philanthropist too and made many donations to the city.  We see Irving fuel stations all over the Maritimes. The Irving pulp and paper mill sits right across from the reversing falls. It manufactures Kraft tissue paper.  They don’t give tours.  We passed by the  big Sims  plant that makes paint brushes and brooms.

Many of the churches and fancy old homes are built of red  stone that was used as ballast on the English ships coming over.  Instead of just dumping the stone, the settlers used it for construction being some of the first forms of recycling.  The English came  looking for the lumber from the nearby forests to  use in the  ship building industries. Kings Square was built in the middle of the town and features one of the nicest City Markets I’ve ever visited.  I could not  help but notice the contrast to the  city markets we visited  in  Mexico.  I recognized every fruit and vegetable and I knew how much it cost.  I saw lovely produce and even better looking meats.  Too  bad the USA will not let us bring  any of this in when we cross back in a week or so.  We had the good fortune to get to go inside the Imperial Theatre which was in its hey day in the  early 1900’s.  It has recently been refurbished and was saved by locals who did not want to see it demolished due to disrepair.  A taxi driver led the  mega fundraising and  now it hosts  plays, concerts and events .  It is absolutely gorgeous inside. Unfortunately nothing was playing during our time here  or I would have gotten a ticket to attend. 

The park in Kings Square is home to numerous  statues  honoring war heroes, founding fathers  and citizens who helped  two shipwrecked men.  It is beautifully manicured and the bandstand in  the middle is home to summer concerts which are now over.  Terry and I commented on the lovely median in the middle of the road alive with brightly colored marigolds.  We learned that is a project done by local elementary school children.  They start the marigolds from seed in school and then the streets are blocked off for them to plant.  It sure dresses up  the city.  We were told a former Mayor made sure the city had plenty of flowers planted.  They are hard  and expensive to maintain however, with the winters.

We passed by many beautiful churches.  Indeed the skyline is filled with spirals and steeples and neat looking architecture.  We were told about one in particular that sailors used to navigate.  When the ship could line up the  3 sister lamp (see photo) with the salmon on top  of steeple  and one other place I don’t recall, then they could navigate safely into the harbor and not hit rocks.  I am left with a desire to return to several spots of interest.  This is a wonderful city.   
Sorry if I botched  any facts.  Two hours of interesting dialogue and two days ago , this old memory just does not retain like it used
Betty Brewer

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ArdraF

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #406 on: September 07, 2008, 02:36:48 PM »
Quote
one of the nicest City Markets I’ve ever visited.  I could not  help but notice the contrast to the  city markets we visited  in  Mexico.  I recognized every fruit and vegetable and I knew how much it cost.  I saw lovely produce and even better looking meats.

You left off clean!  ;) It does look nice.  Did you get to enjoy any of the PEI potatoes while there?  I hadn't had really fresh potatoes in many years and they were so nice.

What a neat idea that mayor had to have the children plant seeds and then replant around the city.  That's a great way to have the children be able to see the end result of their efforts.

I don't remember the story of the mariners lining up the three lights and church steeple salmon to use as channel markers.  Aren't people inventive!  When we first moved to Redwood City CA there was a gigantic salt pile because Leslie Salt had evaporation ponds in the area.  We were told it was a major landmark for pilots flying into San Francisco.  But the salt pile was a whole lot bigger than that light post and salmon!

ArdraF
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Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #407 on: September 07, 2008, 04:19:29 PM »
Betty your  memory was good, the only point I could pick you up on was that the Loyalist left from Long Island NY, mostly from Oyster Bay, in what was referred to as the "Spring Fleet", which arrived in New Brunswick in 1783.  Avery small point, since with its close proximity, Boston might have been a logical exit port.
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BernieD

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #408 on: September 07, 2008, 05:18:35 PM »
September 6,  2008   Saint John City Bus Tour
Irving Company is headquarter here.  KC Irving was among the 10 richest men in the world at his death, with an estimated wealth in the billions of dollars.   He was from  New Brunswick and  made his fortune by  buying companies. He had deals with Henry Ford to  sell the autos here , then he purchased the shipping lines to have them transported.  He was quite a  philanthropist too and made many donations to the city.  We see Irving fuel stations all over the Maritimes. The Irving pulp and paper mill sits right across from the reversing falls. It manufactures Kraft tissue paper.  They don’t give tours. 

Betty

When we last enjoyed the Maritimes 2 years ago, the group we were with were able to stop and tour an Irving lumber mill somewhere in Nova Scotia. Among other things we learned that KC Irving had 3 sons and each one runs (ran?) one part of the company; one for oil, one for transportation and one for forestry.
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #409 on: September 09, 2008, 12:34:29 PM »
September 8, 2008 Saint John City and St. Martin

Today was very sad. Russ left us. We have been traveling together since April and today he ventured back across the border to the USA. His time line is tighter than ours and his destination of Iowa by October 1 sent him off earlier than our schedule. Last night we said our good byes over the photos of our wonderful Atlantic Canada travels. So now we are on our own. Terry and I have only a few days left in Canada and then I will end this journal hoping that those who followed along will someday be able to travel in our footsteps or at least enjoyed our trip vicariously.

It was a beautifully sunshiny day. As I was doing some business on the computer I noted the trailer next to us was leaving. Wait, what’s wrong with this picture? He still had his electrical cord and water hose attached and his mat out. I hollered for him to stop but he did not hear me. Terry got on his shoes and ran out the driveway while the electrical cord bounced along the gravel, the water hose had already pulled off of his trailer. When Terry caught up with the guy and informed him of his problem, he was very embarrassed and came back to his sight to retrieve his water hose and mat. He is from Oregon. Don’t we all need reminders to do the walk around check before we leave a campsite?

My agenda today was to return to the center of Saint John and attend the New Brunswick Museum. It was one of the top 3 I have visited on our travels. Despite my tourist overload this museum had areas of interest covered in a very interesting way. It covered the lumber industry, the ship building industry and artists works. The 25 minute film on the Bay of Fundy was alone worth the price of admission. Too bad but no photos were allowed. We also viewed the spiral staircase in the courthouse built years ago with no structural support. We walked the Kings Square again and were better able to enjoy the statues and monuments. We walked the City Market again and I bought some seaweed that was advertised as something like potato chips. No way. The Firefighters Museum was closed so we missed that venue. I learned that it was closed for lack of volunteers to keep it open at this time of year.

As it was still sunny and bright we moved up the coast for a car trip to tour St. Martins. It was the beginning of The  Fundy Coastal Drive. It had the best scenery we have seen on a coastal drive in New Brunswick. We went through covered bridges and saw lovely shores. We came to the Sea caves and I had my first cup of sea chowder of the trip. It was delicious! We walked on the stone beaches at low tide. It was not easy walking but I did have on my sensible shoes. There were several tour busses offering side trips for cruise ship passengers so we knew we were in “the “ spots to visit. I loved all of it.
Betty Brewer

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Wendy

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #410 on: September 09, 2008, 12:54:02 PM »
You mean we won't get to hear about the rest of your East travels??
Wendy, Mike, and Gordon
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ArdraF

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #411 on: September 09, 2008, 02:32:27 PM »
What delightful photos!  Looks like a neat area.

ArdraF
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JerArdra

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #412 on: September 09, 2008, 06:51:23 PM »
Again and excellent job...Betty.

JerryF
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #413 on: September 09, 2008, 07:08:40 PM »
September 9,  2008  Final Day in Canada, Saint John

We slept in.  It was gloomy and overcast and rained in late afternoon.  We wanted to use up all of  our Canadian money and  headed toward the fuel station.  Terry put $30.30 of fuel into the car to use up our last cash.  We have 7 cents left and the  $2 required to cross the toll bridge in the morning as we leave Canada.  We enjoyed another dinner at the Restaurant at Reversing Falls.

Tonight we reflect on the things we look forward to as we return to the USA.  I will  enjoy using miles, gallons and US currency, where   I can identify a quarter without reading the small print on it.  I will enjoy the use of the US mail system where I understand a stamp.  I will enjoy shopping where I can buy brand names I am familiar with, like Morton salt.  Terry is most looking forward to clams, Mexican food and Olive Garden .

I loved visiting Atlantic Canada.  If we had just visited Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick it would have been as our Journal title indicated, The Maritimes, but because we  also visited Newfoundland, it is more accurate to say Atlantic Canada.  Whatever  we call it, this part of Canada is wonderful.  I learned about the history of Canada and noted how we are more similar than different.  We found folks friendly  outgoing and helpful .  My favorite place was Newfoundland and Twillingate in particular.  It is not likely that we will ever visit this neck of the woods again but we have our memories and photos to remind us of the wonderful times.

Tomorrow we start our farewell to the East Coast tour.  After providing a post with  information on the border crossing, I will not be  doing a daily journal.  I  will miss the closeness I’ve felt by talking to my forum friends every day.   I hope you will consider traveling to this part of the world and that my  travels will guide you to some good times.

Good bye my friends, or

Au Revior mes amis
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Ron

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #414 on: September 09, 2008, 07:20:53 PM »
Enjoyed your reports and photos.  Thanks for taking us with you. Welcome back to the USA.
Ron & Sam-home is where we park it. Currently located   HERE

Lorna

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #415 on: September 09, 2008, 08:03:26 PM »
Terry and Betty

Thanks so much for taking us with you.  All of your reports and the photos were great.  Looking forward to seeing you on the east coast.  Will send you an email in the next day or two.
Lorna
Better to drive thy closet than pack thy suitcase
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Follow our trip of the USA at http://blog.usabyrv.us

Tom and Margi

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #416 on: September 09, 2008, 09:28:59 PM »
We're going to miss our "Daily Betty" read very much.  I remember the withdrawal symptoms we experienced when your Mexico trip ended.  I'm girding for similar withdrawal while missing your Atlantic Canada trip postings.  Great job, Betty!  Thank you so much for your time and effort spent in taking us along with you.   And, thanks for the photos, Terry!

So .... where are we going next year?  :D

Margi

Tom

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #417 on: September 09, 2008, 11:43:40 PM »
Betty's writings have also been captured in our forum library here.
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

Daisy

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #418 on: September 10, 2008, 06:44:35 PM »


Nice job Betty.  We so enjoyed reading your adventures.  And welcome back into the good ol' USA.   ;)

Daisy & Fred
Daisy.  Location:  Sometimes here, Sometimes there.  All depends on the mood of the moment!

Wendy

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Re: Canadian Maritimes with Mahoney/Brewers 08
« Reply #419 on: September 10, 2008, 06:47:15 PM »
Thanks for sharing the travels of the Brewers and Mahoney. Maybe we'll get to that area some day and if we do, we'll have your experience to rely on. Maybe we'll never get there, in which case we were able to enjoy seeing the area through your eyes. Either way, we win.

Thanks
Wendy
Wendy, Mike, and Gordon
~We can't be lost because we don't care where we're going~
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2015 Allegro Ooen Road
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