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Author Topic: Repairing leveling jack ends  (Read 2274 times)

Grizzz1033

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Repairing leveling jack ends
« on: July 20, 2005, 07:41:39 AM »
Hello, I just bought a used travel trailer and when I got it home and dropped 1 of the leveling scissor jacks down, found out the end was shot. It is the kind that a 90 degree bent rod fits in the hole. The hole is shot. What is the best repair for this ??? Do they sell just the ends ??? If so, should I switch to a better style ???  Thanks, any help for the new guy would be greatly appreciated... Grizzz
« Last Edit: July 20, 2005, 07:58:47 AM by Grizzz1033 »

John From Detroit

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Re: Repairing leveling jack ends
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2005, 08:22:15 PM »
If the hole is shot you don't have many options... Some weld shops can perform magic They can do the impossible

And they can flatten the fattest wallet

Replacing the screw is option 1... If you can find a replacment

Replacing the jack is option 2, 3 4 and 5  (many different kinds of replacement jacks, most are better than that one)

I'd consider replacment, Starts at around 20 bucks or less
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Carl L

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Re: Repairing leveling jack ends
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2005, 05:41:42 PM »
Hello, I just bought a used travel trailer and when I got it home and dropped 1 of the leveling scissor jacks down, found out the end was shot. It is the kind that a 90 degree bent rod fits in the hole. The hole is shot. What is the best repair for this ??? Do they sell just the ends ??? If so, should I switch to a better style ???  Thanks, any help for the new guy would be greatly appreciated... Grizzz

First of all, I suspect what you are describing are not levelling jacks, they are stabilizing jacks.  Stabilizing jacks are not meant to bear the full weight of the trailer, they are used only to keep the trailer from bouncing on the suspension while you move around in it.  You just jack them tight without lifting the trailer.   Levelling is done with wood or plastic blocks under the low side wheels and fiddling with the hitch jack.

On that basis you have the option of using a stacker jack to replace it.  On my trailer, the rear stabilitizing jacks kept getting bashed clearing driveways, so I removed them and now use a pair of stackers and find them entirely satisfactory -- and cheap.   ;D
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