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Author Topic: U.S Customs and Border Crossing  (Read 22808 times)

macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #30 on: September 08, 2016, 10:12:19 AM »
Correct Jackie, but one thing that I'm not up to date on (since I haven't taken an international flight in 5 years) ...

In the paper I-94 days, the airlines removed the stapled form from your passport as you checked in for your departing flight. They were also responsible for forwarding the form to the then-INS. But the traveller didn't go through the equivalent of 'Passport Control' that you have at UK airports. So, the question is ...

who enters the electronic record of departure from the USA? Is this done by the airline check-in clerk, or have they implemented a form of Passport Control for departing international passengers?

I read something about the electronic records in my earlier research for other topics, but I don't recall seeing the answer to this question.

On arrival we are photographed and finger-printed and that data is electronically recorded along with passport and visa details by border control.  That is checked against our visas or for anyone without a visa, the ESTA system.  On leaving the US passports and visas are again scanned into the system at the airline check-in/departure desk and presumably again through the final security examination. 

That replaces the old requirement for the collection of I-94 stubs and submitting them to the centre in Bowling Green, KY.

 
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 10:14:01 AM by macmac »

Kevin Means

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2016, 11:57:33 AM »
Correct Jackie, but one thing that I'm not up to date on (since I haven't taken an international flight in 5 years) ...

In the paper I-94 days, the airlines removed the stapled form from your passport as you checked in for your departing flight. They were also responsible for forwarding the form to the then-INS. But the traveller didn't go through the equivalent of 'Passport Control' that you have at UK airports. So, the question is ...

who enters the electronic record of departure from the USA? Is this done by the airline check-in clerk, or have they implemented a form of Passport Control for departing international passengers?

I read something about the electronic records in my earlier research for other topics, but I don't recall seeing the answer to this question.
I travel internationally on a regular basis (leaving again tomorrow) and I've been under the impression that the airlines enter my passport info, because they always request it well ahead of check-in. I ran into a glitch about a year ago when I was flying out of Miami, when the people at the boarding gate said they didn't have my passport info. They were able to check the no-fly list and enter my passport info while I waited at the gate.

Kev

Kev 
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
Towing a Jeep Rubicon Unlimited LJ or an Acura MDX
RVI Brake 2, Minder TM-66 TPMS, 970 watts of solar
(Can't wait to spend more time RVing)
Lakeside, California

macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #32 on: September 08, 2016, 01:23:14 PM »
I travel internationally on a regular basis (leaving again tomorrow) and I've been under the impression that the airlines enter my passport info, because they always request it well ahead of check-in. I ran into a glitch about a year ago when I was flying out of Miami, when the people at the boarding gate said they didn't have my passport info. They were able to check the no-fly list and enter my passport info while I waited at the gate.

Kev

Kev

I fly just one return trip a year now as I've stopped RVing and become a longer-term snowbird.  I agree with what you say.  When booking the flight I am asked to enter details on BA's website.  Whether that is subsequently input manually by a BA operative into the US security system I have no idea but I assumed it would have been an automatic electronic transfer.  If it's done manually there would be a greater chance of errors and omissions.  Thus far no problems with either - I didn't ought to tempt fate!

Tom

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #33 on: September 08, 2016, 01:29:41 PM »
Aye Kevin, things changed significantly after 9/11. I travelled internationally extensively for many years with minimal formalities. I recall when I used to fly into the US as a UK resident in the 70's, US customs/immigration agents used to each have a 'black book' approx 12" thick, and they'd manually check to see if the arriving 'foreign' traveller's name &/or passport number was listed  ;D
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jackiemac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #34 on: September 13, 2016, 12:27:15 AM »
Most travelers will likely know this anyway but the I-94 form has been obsolete for a few years now, replaced by electronic pre-registering of one's identity and status.  Entering and leaving are recorded totally electronically.
Despite the fact that travellers can use the Visa Waiver (ESTA) or a Visa, you still get the blue form to fill in and hand over to the customs guy as you leave the airport.  We have had to do this since we started coming here in 2006.

And yes you do need to give your passport number to the airline, in fact I don't think you can check in online now with BA anyhow unless you have provided your passport info.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2016, 12:30:04 AM by jackiemac »
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

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macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #35 on: September 13, 2016, 12:41:29 AM »
Despite the fact that travellers can use the Visa Waiver (ESTA) or a Visa, you still get the blue form to fill in and hand over to the customs guy as you leave the airport.  We have had to do this since we started coming here in 2006.

And yes you do need to give your passport number to the airline, in fact I don't think you can check in online now with BA anyhow unless you have provided your passport info.

The blue one is a customs declaration.  The white two-piece I-94 used to carry details of one's permission to stay, now recorded wholly electronically.  The customs declaration is for a different purpose.

jackiemac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #36 on: September 13, 2016, 05:34:37 PM »
Ah, I see, didn't realise that!  Thanks
Jackie n Steve - Happy Scottish Travellers

2017 Heartland Sundance 288rls
2016 Dodge Ram 2500 6.4L Hemi

8th May to 30th October 2017 - Touring Western US

macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2016, 07:27:36 AM »
yes very useful information, thanks. I am also going to the USA soon. Now I am on a stage of making documents. I do not know why but I have two denial, as they said there are some mistakes in documents during filling in. Now I am looking for the company who would help me with this issue. I've found this one http://usimmigrationforms.com/ and I heard good feedbacks about them. Have somebody known them?

Are you applying for a B1/B2 visa?  As a visitor that's what you should be doing but if you want to immigrate to the USA these forum boards are not really the right place for such detailed and important information.

Tom

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #38 on: September 16, 2016, 07:42:33 AM »
Are you applying for a B1/B2 visa?  As a visitor that's what you should be doing but if you want to immigrate to the USA these forum boards are not really the right place for such detailed and important information.

True, although some of us have been through the process multiple times, both for ourselves and while sponsoring others, with and without the help of an immigration lawyer. We usually point folks in the right direction to get info from official sources.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2016, 09:33:13 AM by Tom »
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macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2016, 09:43:06 AM »
True, although some of us have been through the process multiple times, both for ourselves and while sponsoring others, with and without the help of an immigration lawyer. We usually point folks in the right direction to get info from official sources.

It was the final part of your posting I had in mind. 

Tom

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #40 on: September 16, 2016, 10:00:55 AM »
We don't pretend to be immigration experts, or to be current on requirements; That's why, in addition to reference to official sources, we'll occasionally suggest a phone consultation with an immigration lawyer.

Our main concern is that would-be visitors educate themselves on the rules and the pitfalls; We've seen too many folks think they can come to the USA, buy an RV, and stay for an undetermined time while supporting themselves with casual (or other) work.
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macmac

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Re: U.S Customs and Border Crossing
« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2016, 11:33:03 AM »
We don't pretend to be immigration experts, or to be current on requirements; That's why, in addition to reference to official sources, we'll occasionally suggest a phone consultation with an immigration lawyer.

Our main concern is that would-be visitors educate themselves on the rules and the pitfalls; We've seen too many folks think they can come to the USA, buy an RV, and stay for an undetermined time while supporting themselves with casual (or other) work.

Would that they/we could - even without working illegally!

 

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