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Author Topic: Help  (Read 3651 times)

jkreas

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Help
« on: March 05, 2009, 02:10:49 PM »
I realize that this probably isn't the right section but it was the closest fit in my eye. So I need some advice on making an 18'x8' cargo trailer livable. I would eventually like to make it into a toyhauler. It is a 2006 american hauler and what I want to do is put in a furnace, cabinets, invertor to run florescent lighting, and a fridge. You know all the creature comforts just like buying one already set up. I can't afford to do it all at once so all I want to do at this time is set up some propane tanks up front and plumb in a furnace and possibly a fridge/freezer that runs on propane and battery, and something to sleep on for my wife and kids. Any advice or tips on how to accomplish this is greatly appreciated.

Thanks :-\

dvsmith86

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Re: Help
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2009, 02:23:05 PM »
This site: http://www.cheaprvliving.com/index.html has all sorts of ideas, some crazy, some practical.  On a link somewhere on that site, there is a utility trailer conversion.

http://www.cheaprvliving.com/StealthCargoTrailer.html is the one I was thinking of.  You may not be into the "stealth" concept that this author is looking for, but still the notes should be helpful.

HTH,
Doug
« Last Edit: March 05, 2009, 02:30:45 PM by dvsmith86 »
Doug & Vicki Smith
'12 Visa Travel Trailer
'08 Suzuki Grand Vitara
Anderson, MO home base

geodrake

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Re: Help
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2009, 08:22:49 AM »
Welcome aboard jkreas!  You really don't need the inverter to run the florescent lights.  Most RVs use 12 volt DC for lighting including florescent lights. 
George Drake

S J Strait

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  • 2004 ford f250 deisel 27' 2007 freedom spirit
Re: Help
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2009, 09:30:09 AM »
Doug,
Neat site!
Steve,Lisa and the rest of the Strait gang.
The Adirondacks park is our back yard.

dvsmith86

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Re: Help
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2009, 11:35:19 AM »
My wife stumbled across that site when I started talking up boondocking as a way to extend our trip this summer.  She really got a kick out of the 5-gallon bucket article http://www.cheaprvliving.com/Goingtothebathroom.html at the bottom of the page.  Totally grossed her out!
Doug & Vicki Smith
'12 Visa Travel Trailer
'08 Suzuki Grand Vitara
Anderson, MO home base

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Help
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2009, 08:22:28 PM »
Quote
Most RVs use 12 volt DC for lighting including florescent lights.

12v fluorescents actually have what in essence is a tiny inverter built into the ballast. The fluorescent tube needs alternating current to work.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

jkreas

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Re: Help
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2009, 09:35:02 PM »
thanks for all the help it is a great place to start.

hankpac

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Re: Help
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2009, 10:25:58 PM »
Here's a thought: If you build the beds up higher (4 feet, to 6 feet above the floor) all that space UNDER is cabinetry, and highly usable. Master above in the front, with galley to one side, Kids near on the other side. Remember: If you are making this for habitation, you HAVE to have escape hatches next to the beds. One in the vent hatch for your bed, and one next to the kids bed, if they aren't next to a door that they can just bomb out of in an emergency (fire). You HAVE to put this in no matter what.
Secondly, unless you put the galley outside in a shelter, you may have to have a window and fire extinguisher at the cook stove. 
Finally, consider how you will heat the rig, since there will be poor ventilation in a cargo trailer, and propane powered catalytics can kill kids faster than adults.
One set up I saw had a small air-tight stove, with air supply piped in through the floor, and smoke stack out the top. Worked great. Fire alarm and CO detector right next to the stove.
Remember that you will have to pull everything (toys and tools) out before anyone can cook or sleep. You cannot just load to allow simultaneous use, since your load distribution will be wrong if you are taking heavy gear like ATVs or snowmobiles,  gen set,cans of fuel, pioneering tools, etc.
Be sure to take chains and locks for all the stuff.
One of our guys comes to elk camp each year set up like you describe. He hauls tons of stuff, but once the trailer is empty, just cots, a heater, three ice chests and a small library. Oh, and their bags of clothes. Everything else is outside. Locked up.
I noticed in another camp, that the wives (family elk camp) had fixed up the Forest Service pit toilet with several selections of baby wipes, and hand sanitizers, and bottled water. and Air freshener. Lovely.
Good luck, have fun.

rgm

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Re: Help
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2009, 03:58:43 PM »
 you could also find a wrecked camper and use it for parts

 

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