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Author Topic: Heading to Canada  (Read 115849 times)

rankjo

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #150 on: June 24, 2009, 08:58:59 AM »
Just a small thing that you said you were puzzled about, that the man in Montreal couldn't tell you the tunnel clearance in meters, only in feet.  Here in Canada we changed to meters (to get in line with the rest of the world) only a few decades ago, and though everything is now done in metric, most of us are still more comfortable in feet and inches.  I suppose the next generation will be totally metric.

Rankjo

Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #151 on: June 24, 2009, 09:10:53 AM »
And to add to Rankjo, all building materials are still sold in feet and inches, not metric.  Building standards were all made before the switch.  40.64cm on center would be a pain to measure when building a wall  ;D
Marc...

Tom

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #152 on: June 24, 2009, 09:21:51 AM »
Just curious if the guy who gave Marsha the height of the tunnel in feet was guessing, or if such heights are posted both ways, or maybe the guy remembered what the sign said before it was changed to metric.

I understand that it might take a generation to convert 100% to metric. We went through it in the UK many years ago, and the government launched a huge campaign to try to educate the public. I'd been raised on imperial measurements and, when I returned to university during my working life, had to re-learn everything in metric terms or, more correctly, the SI system (system internationale), aka the rationalized metric system.

I had to unlearn it all when we later moved to the US and, thanks to differences such as US gallons, couldn't revert 100% to my education in imperial measurements. Then along came measurements such as "a country mile".

Interestingly, when my oldest son (now 42) recently visited from the UK and we both worked on a number of projects, he was equally comfortable with metric or imperial measurements, although his first option was always metric. His 22 year old son uses only metric, except when he deals with pints of beer in his job at a pub; I suspect some things might never go metric.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2009, 09:36:33 AM by Tom »
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Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #153 on: June 24, 2009, 09:42:43 AM »
I find metric easy and interesting.  Everything is a multiple of 10, so no need for complex fractions. 

And also how it's all related to water.
1 litre of water weighs 1 kilogram
1000 ml or 1 litre of water is 1000 cubic centimeter
water freezes at 0C
water boils at 100C
Marc...

Tim Lassen

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #154 on: June 25, 2009, 07:03:12 PM »
Tom..This was a younger person and I think he was just math challenged..but he was a nice young man with a great smile.  We have become quite familiar with metric system and Marsha has also become quite adept at at converting centigrade to Farenheit and back.  One concern I have is that is that Marsha has become attracted to the young French Canadians..I guess I better start jogging..tim
Allegro Bus
Full Time (Part Time) Still Married to Marsha

Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #155 on: June 25, 2009, 07:32:22 PM »
...  One concern I have is that is that Marsha has become attracted to the young French Canadians..I guess I better start jogging..tim


Hey, I'm young and French Canadian.
Marc...

Tom

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #156 on: June 25, 2009, 11:34:27 PM »
Quote
This was a younger person and I think he was just math challenged

Is this the McDonalds syndrome? The kids press the photo of the hamburger or the fries on the register.
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Tim Lassen

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #157 on: June 26, 2009, 08:00:13 AM »
marc..you don't know what you'd be letting yourself into.  Tom..think he was just new on job and nervous..tim
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Marsha/CA

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #158 on: June 26, 2009, 08:05:50 AM »
Oh No Tom,

He was a young French Canadian fella!   ;D

Marc,

Well this is great news since you have so generously agreed to accept my pressure pro package from the States that Tim and I plan to stop by and retrieve from you.  I just figured you were an old "retired" French Canadian; like my darling husband; an old "retired" Midwestern American.   :D

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #159 on: June 26, 2009, 08:06:25 AM »
No worries Tim, I'm on a tight leash.
Marc...

Marsha/CA

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #160 on: June 26, 2009, 10:00:32 AM »
I was in the Laundry room in the campground yesterday and some folks from Ottawa warned me that there is something called "Construction Vacation" where all the electricians, carpenters, plumbers etc all take vacation at once.  They mentioned that all the campgrounds will be full and that I should be making reservations at the campgrounds from about mid July to the end of July. 

Those who have visited up here, did you have any trouble finding sites to camp during this construction vacation?  I love not having a schedule, but don't want to get stuck either.

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #161 on: June 26, 2009, 10:32:43 AM »
They are right Marsha, this year, I believe it is the last week of July and the first week of August.  My brother that lives in Montréal explained that they look at the trends and take the two weeks which they expect to be the hottest.  They do this so that construction workers don't have to work on the two hottest weeks of the summer.

During those two weeks, there will be lots of people vacationing in Québec, obviously, but also in New Brunswick and PEI, primarily in the regions with nice beaches.  They also travel alot in the US, mainly Old Orchard and Platsburg, but with the line-ups now with the passports and the economy, more and more are staying in Canada VS visiting the US.

It's also the same time of year that a lot of Canadians take their vacation, regardless where they live, because we want to enjoy the nice weather. So it's always wise to book ahead if possible.
Marc...

Jeff

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #162 on: June 26, 2009, 11:15:23 AM »
Marsha:

We skipped PQ last year but NB, PEI, NS, and NL we called the day before at the most and got in all except one cg in Fredrickton that had a large caravan due the same day. One BIG exception is Pippy Park in St John's. Call there as soon as you make your ferry reservations.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2009, 01:32:32 PM by Jeff »

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #163 on: June 26, 2009, 01:21:53 PM »
     To be honest, it would be nice if the campsites were full, but with the economy the way it is, and a significant drop in US tourists, I cannot believe that you would have any trouble other than the long week end in August, which is August 1st to 3rd, ie the first Monday in August.  And then I'd be surprised if sites were all full.  Keep checking with the Provincial tourist bureaus as they will make the reservations for you.
Ed & Donna
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2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Marc L

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #164 on: June 26, 2009, 01:31:59 PM »
That first week of August is already booked in a few campgrounds.  Me and my brother could not get a spot at Kouchibouguac and a friend could not find anything in Cap Pelé or Shédiac.  But those spots are usually in-demand.  The other areas should be fine.
Marc...

rankjo

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #165 on: June 26, 2009, 05:38:39 PM »
Ok, Marsha, so you are going to St John(NB) to meet Marc, so you are probably going to come through Fredericton, the capital of NB.

There are three major campgrounds, 

Mactaquac
Wulastukw/Woolastook   The first spelling is in Maliseet, the local aboriginal language, and the second in English
Hartt Island (aka "The Bucket Club" [there is a golf range there]).

The first two are beautiful rural campsites, on the water, and Government-supervised.  There will be no difficulty getting into either.  They are big (by New Brunswick standards).  Both are about 25km(15miles), or 25 minutes, from the city.  Woolastook has three-way hookups, but otherwise is a beautiful 'nature' park.  Mactaquac has a nice beach, a tournament golf course which is is beautiful condition (I played it last week), and an adventure cable ride through the treetops which is apparently excellent and takes two hours or more to traverse.  There is also a houseboat rental place where you can stay out overnight or whatever and cruise the very pretty river.  Mactaquac is an excellent park in beautiful condition.

Hartt Island is also a very nice park, IF you can get into it.  It has the advantage that it is about 10 minutes from the downtown core, but it is small and is often full, I am told.  It has the driving range, a new pool, and canoes on the river.  But the park is small, I'm guessing 60 sites, and some are permanent seasonal residents, so you would need to book ahead.

Having said all that, there are two ways to get to Marc in St John.  The first and most obvious is down the Trans Canada Highway (TCH) on the western side of the Province.  It is as good a highway as you will find anywhere, and 95% empty, and will get you quickly through the forests from the Gaspe to Fredericton.  (You have to fork off to Hwy 7 south of Fredericton to get to St John and it is also a very good highway).

The second way is to follow the coast.  This is all 2-lane, is obviously much slower, but is prettier.  There are small fishing towns, places to wander, lighthouses, and stuff like that.  A route to take your time with.  Eventually you will have to cut across to Fredericton or Moncton to get to St John.

You may think I am boosting New Brunwick, but boosting implies artificial enhancement and I have strictly avoided that.
But New Brunswick's great anyway. :-)

Jeff

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #166 on: June 26, 2009, 05:54:37 PM »
Marsha:

I assume you will see Fundy National Park, Cape Enrage, and the Hopewell Rocks on your way up to Moncton. If you want great seafood talk Tim into dinner at the Tides Restaurant in Alma.

ArdraF

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #167 on: June 26, 2009, 09:56:20 PM »
I second what Jeff said!  MUST see the tideS (in and out) at Hopewell Rocks.  We ate dinner at the Tides for two nights.  Not only good food but you see the fishing boats rise or fall during dinner as the tide ebbs or floods.  Re reservations.  In 2006 we had only one case where there was only one site left and that was a holiday weekend.  Otherwise we made no prior reservations except Pippy Park.  Canada Day is July 1st and is a big holiday like our 4th of July.

ArdraF
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Marsha/CA

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #168 on: June 27, 2009, 09:48:11 PM »
Warning LONG

North Gaspe Peninsula: Today Wednesday is definitely not going to be a rain day.  At exactly 4:30 AM the sun has popped out and is staring Tim straight in the eye.  

The morning stayed beautiful and we enjoyed relaxing with a late start after 10 AM.  Charlie had time to run and play ball and finally we decided to move along, but hating to leave such a great location.

I wanted to drive today and as luck would have it the roads turned to crap.  Not only was the pavement in very bad shape, but it rock and rolled our coach to the point of being annoying.  Also we stopped for flagmen at least 4-5 times and traveled several kilometers on temporary roads.  All the above we have tackled before, but not mile after mile.  Although the speed was about 55 mph it was hard to maintain a speed over 45 mph.  Ok we got use to the rough road and even make jokes as we travel on and then we see signs about grades of 14% and more both up and down.  Wow!  What fun, but everything worked like it was suppose to.

We made several scenic stops including a nice rest stop for lunch with a great overlook of the seaway.  As we traveled farther east we entered the Forillon Provincial Park and also started traveling along the bay of St. Lawrence.  We also passed two items of interest according to guide books, but were not able to actually find them.  One was a shipwreck from an English naval ship of the 1700’s and the other was a World War II location where an enemy torpedo struck near a village.  We stopped, looked and listened but nothing could be found.

At some point on the drive, we changed drivers.  Tim lucked out and didn’t encounter any more 14-15% grades like I had dealt with except for the one going down into Perce’, it was 18%.  It was short and steep and by the time we got to the bottom, where there was a 50 km sign, the brakes smelled a bit, but we made it just fine.

Our campsite tonight is just south of Perce’ overlooking the Perce rock which is a well known landmark similar to the Morro Bay rock; tomorrow we plan to explore after a tough day of driving.

Thursday Morning and wouldn’t ya know, we awakened to fog and lots of it…drats.  We decide this is a good day to do laundry and for Tim to download financial stuff.  This isn’t as good of a campground for Charlie, but he’s managing with playing ball and greeting people.  Charlie has one particular lady friend who thinks he is just the most wonderful dog and always gives him treats.  

We stopped in at the information center where they spoke broken English and directed us to an “Ami” or Coop.  The supplies were limited, but we could get some of what we needed.  On our drive around the town, we spotted a bakery shop operating out of a house.  We took a chance and stumbled onto some great stuff:  fresh croissants, small baguettes, and elephant ear cookies, which they called palmieres (spelling?)  (palm leaf) cookies.  As Tim was wandering around the shop, he spied “meat pies”, poulet (chicken), saumon (salmon) and cod, along with fresh apple and sugar (sucre) pies.  Tomorrow we plan to stop in again and pick up a couple of pies for dinner after we have hiked and visited the Island Bonaventure and Rocher Perce’ (the rock at Perce’)

Many things can be learned in a campground laundry. <smile>.  Fly fishing is a well known sport here.  Along our route, we kept seeing signs posted under the name of the river and didn’t know exactly what that meant, but now I know.   So if the name of the river is “Sandy River” and has a sign below the name saying “salmon”, then that means that salmon is in the river and you are allowed to fish it.  In Quebec Province, you can only catch 7 salmon for the entire salmon fishing season and must report each fish you catch or you will be fined heavily.

We also learned that the ferry boat ride to the island is like a local bus that stops every hour.  So your ride includes a visit to the Perce rock and then to the island where you get off to explore; then when you are ready, you wait for the next ferry.  How convenient.  Tonight for dinner we are having Canadian Minestrone soup with those wonderful new bakery items we found today.

Friday started out looking like a sunny day but as the morning progressed the sky did not clear and more fog moved in.  This was our last day to visit Perce, so regardless of the fog, we set out to explore.  First on our itinerary was visiting the rock and Bonaventure Island.  We purchased our boarding passes for the boat and enjoyed a chilly but foggy ride to the island.  We did stop at Perce rock and the young naturalist on the boat explained the geology of the rock both in French and English.  We thought he was a good sport because he had limited English and read entirely from a script.  He also read the French from a script so I think he was new to the job and probably a summer student.   Before docking at the island, we circled the shoreline where we were given an introduction to the many birds and mammals of the island.  The Northern Gannet is the most famous of the birds and this Island is the larger of only two nesting grounds in the entire world.  Over 220,000 Gannets nest on this island over the summer.   We also were able to see several other species of birds, including small penguins, cormorants and others whose names we have forgotten. Along the coast on the rocks several grey seals were visible.

When we get to the island it is 2 PM and to see the gannets nesting area is about a 2-1/2 hour round trip hike of about 4 miles so we decide to save our picnic until we return to the dock.  The last boat from the island leaves at 5PM.  The fog was not as thick and the sun tried to come out, but never quite made it which now is a good thing because the walk was slightly uphill most of the way and the day was warming up once we were off the water.  Everything was very green and there were several flowers of white, pink, yellow and blue as well as some very large what looked like cauliflower heads with very small white blossoms.  Some small boys were walking ahead of us and found a very small vole (we think) not more than an inch in diameter with no tail.  He moved around nibbling on something and was pretty much oblivious of the crowd of people hanging over him.

As we approach the Gannets we first hear them and then we smell them.  As we turn the corner I cannot explain the sight of so many birds all in one place.  Betty had mentioned this is her log; but until you’ve seen it, you really can’t imagine such a sight.  We saw several earlier on our tour of the island nesting on the cliffs, so we expected more of the same but not this.  Over a large sloping area at the top of the cliffs were thousands of the birds in all different sizes as far as you could see.  The Parc had constructed a wooden structure so we could walk into the middle of the birds without disturbing them.  We saw young birds and older birds.  Young males arguing and mated couples roosting on their fledglings.  Other mothers were sitting on eggs and several couples were gyrating together doing whatever.  The whole scene was just unbelievable and we are very glad we didn’t let the foggy weather distract us from making this visit.  Our return hike was also enjoyable and mostly downhill.  When we return, we tour some of the restored homes that were at the dock.  No one lives on the Island now, as it is protected, but at one time it was a thriving fishing community. When the fishing company left the island, most of the inhabitants left the island.  In the seventies when the island was purchased by the government only seven families remained and they were relocated.

Returning to Perce’ we once again visited the bakery where we buy: more bread, a chicken meat pie and a salmon meat pie along with <gasp> a sugar pie and an apple pie.  Great, another notch to let out of our belts.

How does one pick a restaurant to eat?  Since this is a seafood area, I wanted to have salmon or shrimp for dinner.  Our original plan was to heat up one of the meat pies we had purchased, but then we rethunk… ;) (a Marsha word) the plan and decided the meat pies would be good for tomorrow because it’s a driving day and much easier to heat up a meat pie than to do a full fledged meal.  Good thinking, don’t ya think?

We decided to try a place near the wharf where we had disembarked.  There were no customers, so we were a bit leary; but stayed anyway.  The waitress spoke very little English and she was elated when we knew the difference between a petite glass of beer or a grande one.  The menu was in both French and English, so that helped a bunch.  Tim ended up ordering poached salmon with 3 cheeses and I got shrimp and rice.  Both were fabulous.  Another couple from Quebec we had met on the boat meandered in; it was fun to know someone there.  About half way through our meal one of the owners <?>, began to play the guitar and asked where each of the couples were from and got a kick that we were from California.  He immediately began to try to play California Dreamin, Horse with No Name and other similar songs.   He only knew a few words of English so often he would stop singing words and only hum over words he didn’t know.  It was actually great fun.  I think we were eating a bit early for French Canadians, as we were leaving people began to arrive for dinner.

Out in the parking lot a young couple noted we were from California and asked how our visit to Quebec Province was going.  He specifically wanted to know if we had felt welcomed.  We bent over backwards telling him how everyone had made us feel like they were glad to meet us and helped us work through the language.  He was glad to hear that we felt comfortable.  At the end of our conversation, he said he worked for the Quebec Tourism and was glad to learn of our trip.

Tomorrow we cross over into the Province of New Brunswick where the road signs are in both French and English….Oh boy, we’ll know where we are going and I won’t be scrambling with my French to English road sign “cheat-sheet”.  

Entering New Brunswick:  
Today we sadly leave Quebec and the Gaspe Peninsula.  As we wake up it is still foggy, but as a bonus it begins to rain just as Tim starts disconnecting all the outside hookups.  He also informs me that the “mosquito pants” I laundered a couple of days ago are still not dry (they need to line dry) and are now smelling a bit mildewy.  (another Marsha word)  Sure wish I had a washer/dryer in this coach.

As we complete our loop around the Gaspe Peninsula the day improves and fog and rain become just overcast and finally a nice day for about two hours.  We find the roads on the south side of the peninsula to be exceptional with good pavement and mild grades.  Quite a contrast to the conditions encountered on our drive to Perce.  The scenery is wonderful and roadside flowers are abundant.  We stop in Bonaventure for lunch at Tim Horton’s (I’m starting to LOVE Tim Hortons) and then made several additional stops along the way to view scenery.  The water has now changed with bigger waves and more vastness.  At one rest stop we met Puzzle, a black standard poodle and his owners, a family from Montreal, and we compared notes on the similarities of the two and their poodle personalities.  We do this with hand jestures, broken French and English.  It was great fun with lots of laughs.  Puzzle was nine years old and not necessarily appreciative of Charlie’s rambunctiousness, so she put him in his place.

Late in the afternoon we neared Point A la Croix, QB in preparation for crossing into New Brunswick.  I was an eagle eye looking for the low railroad bridge that Ardra and Betty had warned about.  Good ole Juan (John) Tim’s Streets and Maps GPS system steered us right onto the correct road.   We saw the low bridge out of the corner of our eye and were very glad we didn’t have to deal with it.  We make a quick stop at the information center to pickup maps and tourist information for our stay here.  We saw the statue of a large Atlantic salmon near the information center and across the street is a lifensize statue of a fly fisherman catching a salmon that Betty and Ardra had seen.  Both were spectacular and set us in the mood for fishing.   A little further down the road we stop at the community of Dalhousie, NB where we camp for the night.  Our campsite is on the beach of Chaleur Bay which is a smaller bay off the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  We have plenty of room for Charlie to play along the beach and wouldn’t you know it he finds a new ball floating in the water.

More fog and more drizzle but we are becoming use to the weather which is good, because the forecast for the next seven days is rain.  For dinner we heat up the meat pies we bought yesterday and decided we liked the chicken, but the salmon pie needed some type of sauce.  During our dinner some local New Brunswick people knocked on our door and welcomed us to New Brunswick and said they were happy to see us visit from so far away.  We were quite astonished, felt very welcomed and believe this is a sign that we are going to enjoy our New Brunswick experience.

Marsha~
« Last Edit: June 27, 2009, 10:41:23 PM by Marsha/CA »
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

ArdraF

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #169 on: June 27, 2009, 10:09:37 PM »
Marsha and Tim,

Don't forget to try the cod!  It's yummy.  Especially in Newfoundland.  I've read that we no longer really get cod (even though that's what it says in the ingredients list) in our prepared and boxed fish dinners down here.  I pigged out on the cod because it was fresh and good.

So glad you got mostly good weather on the Gaspe.  Aren't you glad you didn't drive the north side in fog?!?

ArdraF
ArdraF
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Marsha/CA

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #170 on: June 27, 2009, 10:39:25 PM »
Ya know, Ardra, I really want to thank you and all of the rest of the forum folks who have put logs, journals, posts and whatever on here.  It really helps and makes us feel like we aren't doing this alone.  To get suggestions, warnings and everything else sure makes the trip enjoyable. 

I think its also great that we have so many more Canadians on here, you guys are helping Tim and I out so much with your suggestions, explanations and just good down-right friendship; we really appreciate it.

So now that I have flattered you to death, I need a campground suggestion for Caraquet.  I can't remember if Marc, John, Jeff or Ed suggested a place or not; but I can't find it in the thread.  Is there a good place to camp so that we can explore the area?

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #171 on: June 28, 2009, 06:23:01 AM »
     Sorry Marsha, with a cottage in the Shediac area, we have not done any RVing on the North Shore, but I do have friends who have and love it.  The Acadian peninsula is a real treat with it's strong Acadian roots, restaurants, shops and music.  You'll love it!!  You should be hitting fresh lobster and snow crab at the local fish stores, I am told that it is the cheapest it has been in years.  Bad news for the fishermen, but great news for the consumer.
     When do you expect to hit Shediac?  Donna and I will be in Dartmouth for about another week, then we plan on picking up the RV and going to PEI to tromp some cemeteries, or maybe we'll do that in southern NB.
     The Weimerts are handy, we've corresponded, but haven't gotten to meet them yet.
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #172 on: June 28, 2009, 07:09:06 AM »
    A quick google gave me the following website.  It is in Caraquet in the heart of where you will be going.

http://www.sn2000.nb.ca/comp/colibri/index-en.htm

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Tom

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #173 on: June 28, 2009, 08:34:21 AM »
Quote
During our dinner some local New Brunswick people knocked on our door and welcomed us to New Brunswick and said they were happy to see us visit from so far away.

We repeatedly found the same welcoming hospitality while in NB.

We stayed at the Camping Colibri that Ed mentioned. Don't forget to visit the Acadian historic village just a country mile away, and allow sufficient time to see all the exhibits.
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rankjo

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #174 on: June 28, 2009, 10:54:58 AM »
A quickie addition to the translation of Rocher Perce,

Rocher is 'rock', and Perce is 'pierced'
ie Pierced Rock --- because there is a big rock there with a hole right through it.  Simple, eh?

And Pointe a la Croix   is better known as 'Cross Point', though it doesn't sound so good in English.

Rankjo

momma22smallbears

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #175 on: June 29, 2009, 03:28:10 PM »
Marsha,

I've been travelling and had no access to internet so i'm catching up on all your posts.  Glad you liked my favorite things:  poutine and Tim Horton's coffee! :)
It seems you are having a wonderful time and i look forward to reading about what happened when you left the Quebec City area.  I hope you drove past St. Anne de Beaupre because that is where it gets really beautiful.  I have never been to the other areas where you are going so look forward to adding things to our list of places to visit and things to do.  Thanks for sharing!

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #176 on: June 30, 2009, 08:59:06 AM »
     Well Marsha, Frank and Barb made it into Halifax yesterday, and to quote Barb since we talked about "black water" at the Supper table, it was officially a "mini-rally".  I thought that all the advice they gave Donna and I about Arizona would be a better gauge, but what do I know.  It is really fantastic to meet more and more GREAT forum members, so at some point we have got to stop playing hop scotch and actually meet.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Jeff

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #177 on: June 30, 2009, 11:49:01 PM »
Ed:

Remind Marsha she knows its an "official" mini rally when you publish the photo. ;D

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #178 on: July 01, 2009, 05:50:36 AM »
     Took the camera, put it in the centre console, and promptly forgot about it.  In fact it is still out in the toad, thanks Jeff, I will have to go out and get it.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Barb

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Re: Heading to Canada
« Reply #179 on: July 01, 2009, 07:37:11 AM »
We had our camera, but also left it in the toad.  We had a great time. Ed and Donna took us on a tour of the city. Lot of history in Halifax and Dartmouth.  We had supper in one of their favorite pub's. We than took an evening drive, stopped for ice cream, and ended up for coffee. We talked for hours.  It was a long day, but an excellent day. I think I talked Ed into coming to Az for the winter. Donna even seemed hip on joining us at Q. There was 5 days of rain predicted, but the sun shone proudly yesterday, and Frank and I went to the lighthouse at Peggy's Cove. And saw all the beautiful scenery we've been missing in the rain and fog. Tomorrow we are leaving working our way to Baddeck, NS.

Happy Canada Day
Barb
2003 NRV Tradewinds LTC
2011 Jeep Rubicon Unlimited

 

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