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Author Topic: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)  (Read 3280 times)

Th_ RVing_Sheltie

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No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« on: December 24, 2009, 07:07:40 PM »
I'm new to all this and thankful for all the advise I've read here.

I have, and live in, a 74' Class C motor home. Just finished gutting it all out and making it into a super place to live. Have two questions though.

Why don't I see or hear about skylights in the ceiling of an RV. Seems like the perfect place, and let in a lot of light. But there must be something I don't see. For the sake of the question say I was thinking of a skylight, 4' x 6'.

My second question is about putting in a regular door.Can you put a regular door/door frame in replacement of the original? I wondered if a wood door frame could handle the needed flexibility. Since I live in my RV and don't use it to travel, it may not be a problem.

Thanks everyone!
 8)












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Wendy

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2009, 07:31:08 PM »
Hi Sheltie. My parents have a 5th wheel with a skylight in the living area. It has a slide just like one in a car and it lets in a ton of light when slid back. We have a stationary skylight in the shower in our motorhome....let's in a lot of light but also lets in a lot of cold. So, yes, Santa, there are skylights  ;D

Wendy
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bigskymt

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2009, 08:11:11 PM »
  Skylights seem to be disguised as escape hatches in some RVs and as shower roofs in others.
   I'm thinking a single pane skylight would be a heat loss in winter and a solar heater in summer. Nightime hours would reward you with an excellent dripping "dehumidifier' in damp areas.
  I've seen M/Hs with wood doors, aluminum doors etc. If you plan to permanently park I'd guess anything plugging the hole is sufficient....the more insulation and better seal the better.

rjf7g

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2009, 09:36:19 PM »
We looked at a Cherokee trailer that had skylights over the dinette.  Gulf Stream's new Super Max (class C) and Montaj (class A) units have skylights.
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Th_ RVing_Sheltie

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2009, 11:11:45 PM »
Excellent, excellent! Thank you for advise and places to look  Now have to look into problems of heat loss and too much heat, maybe double pane. My brother thought I could make a sliding door on the roof and use a motor like on a garage door. I'll let you know. First thing is that will have to be a might warmer here in SC than it is at present before I get brave.

I'll keep an update on what I end up doing, thanks again.

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tennsmith

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2009, 11:40:57 PM »
RV walls, compared to a home, are quite thin.  If you buy a standard door/frame, I don't think the frame will close together enough to make contact with the wall on both sides.  The door itself (1 3/8") is likely as thick or thicker than an RV wall.  Most RV walls are made of 1" or so thick framing, then covered on the outside with aluminum or fiberglas and on the inside with a thin wall material with insulation in the space between the inside/outside walls.

I suppose you could put a thick wood shim on the inside to build the wall thickness to the point where the frame would touch both sides, but I'd be surprised if the frame will collapse much thinner than about 3".
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ttyR2

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Re: No, Santa, there's still a roof there :)
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 08:24:48 PM »
I wouldn't think a regular home door would put up with the racking and vibration that an RV goes through, or be sealed as well, and probably be heavier too unless you get a hollow-core door.
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