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Author Topic: Rebuilding a burnt RV  (Read 3778 times)

JxxxOxxxE

  • Posts: 2
Rebuilding a burnt RV
« on: May 27, 2010, 10:29:44 AM »
Well, I just signed up last night so I could get some feedback on an idea I've been considering, I tried a search, but didnt come up with anything...

My wife's side of the family has RV's and have been after us for sometime to also get one. Our problem is, we would like a very nice one, which everyone knows comes at a not very nice price...

I was browsing ebay the last few days and have seen more than a few fire salvaged RV's. Some need some interior and exterior work, some just interior work...Some still run and drive, some don't...The one I just watched end yesterday was a 2005 Holiday Rambler Endeavor. It went for $25K, it was $270k new...

Now I'm pretty handy myself and can do carpentry, electrical work, flooring, and have above average mechanical skills. I was figuring that these things are being salvaged not so much due to material costs, but actual labor costs. I figure most RV places are going to charge $100+ an hour, which adds up quick to an insurance company...

My guess is that I could redo the entire interior of one for less than $30k. Does that seems out of line? Maybe even sounds high to me? I built a 1000 sq ft addition to our house that only cost $30k finished out...

So, has anyone ever rebuilt a burnt out RV? I figure people rebuild and restore cars all the time and they fix up houses to sell, what would be so hard about an RV?\


34footer

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2010, 01:21:42 PM »
The theft recoveries are the better units to salvage. Burnt RV's can be a nightmare.
J
1988 Pace Arrow, 34 feet, Chevy 454
                       So Cal

seilerbird

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2010, 01:37:32 PM »
You'll never get the smell out of a burnt RV.

I think you would be better off applying your skills to an older motorhome, like I am doing. You can buy a really nice 90s RV for under $10k and after putting $10 to $20k into it would be just like new.

JxxxOxxxE

  • Posts: 2
Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2010, 02:09:44 PM »
A theft recovery would definitely be nice...

I've thought about the smell. I figured I tear the existing wall coverings out, and replace the insulation...

Someone else mentioned that I might never get rid of the smell, but just because 1 bedroom of a house catches on fire, they usually dont demolish the whole house. And I would think they usually get rid of the smell...

34footer, thats what I am looking for, the nightmare. I'm wanting as much info as possible...what would be the hardest part of replacing an entire interior?

34footer

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2010, 02:40:25 PM »
I would not say that the work is hard. It's time consuming, when do you plan on using this RV? If you go the burnt route, be sure that you test all systems thoroughly prior to closing up the walls. Salvage vehicles don't have good trade-in value, so when it comes time to move up you will have to take a hit. Some insurance companies won't insure them, and those that will won't give you good coverage. Since you are willing to spend $55,000, for a few bucks more and no headaches here is a good starter MH. (click below) This is just the asking price, work out a deal and you can be camping this summer. A lot of salvage projects end up being sold because of the time involved, changes in life, and cost over runs. A weekend MH'er does not really need a Diesel Pusher, a nice $20,000 Gasser is plenty.
http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/diesel/2000-Holiday-Rambler-Endeavor-17467.htm
J
1988 Pace Arrow, 34 feet, Chevy 454
                       So Cal

PatrioticStabilist

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  • Carolyn (mom), Tom (Dad), and Sue Anne (daughter)
Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2010, 05:49:28 PM »
An RV with a salvage title is practically worthless. I bought one that had hail damage on the roof, nothing else was wrong but they totaled it.  I used the white filler type stuff all over the roof, never leaked.  I did sell it but had also rented it for a year and made money on it, but would not have if I had not done that.

In Texas they have to be identified on the title as salvage, the reason down here is because we have so many flood vehicles.
Added 1992 American Eagle diesel pusher 38 ft

Winnie Sightseer 29 ', 2005 Class A 2 slides!  Bought 5/5/2010, Sold 1/7/2012. Added Tru Center , Trac Bar,  Air bags, Bilstein shocks Compressor for air bags, new awnings . New tires. New satellite dome, 2 flat screens
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billwild

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2010, 06:33:26 PM »
Another option is  www.crankyape.com  they have reposessions and many of them have interior damage and also a very reasonable prices. They will list what is wrong with the motorhomes and these units can be inspected prior to purchase. These units are all up for auction.

Bill
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 06:39:09 PM by billwild »
2005 Holiday Rambler Endeavor---2004 Honda CRV

SargeW

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2010, 08:36:43 PM »
From poking around my RV I would think that the hardest part would be the wiring.  Mine is a mass of wires for the multiple systems that all run and talk to each other.  You would be better ripping it all out and starting from scratch.
Marty--
2013 Phaeton 36GH
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ArdraF

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2010, 10:46:12 PM »
I don't know a thing about rebuilding, but I do know that getting the burned smell out of things isn't easy.  Also, a motorhome that has burned could have damaged wiring that is hidden and you wouldn't know it's there unless you uncovered every surface and checked every wire inch by inch.  Do you have any idea how many miles of wiring are in a motorhome, even old ones?  There are a lot!  A water-damaged salvage wouldn't be much better.  Personally I'd tend to avoid either fire- or water-damaged salvage vehicles.  The people who suggested theft or repo units have a good idea - not such a bad "salvage" in my opinion.

ArdraF
ArdraF
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Jack Nichols

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Re: Rebuilding a burnt RV
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2010, 11:18:04 PM »
I bought a very nice 2003 Class A that had been sitting for a couple of years, no salvage, no fire, just sitting.  I have been nearly two (enjoyable) years getting everything to work.  Living in it has made rehabbing easier, because I am living IN my work. 

I can't imagine dealing with the electrical or system unknowns of a burned one.  If you just want the chassis to rebuild on, maybe.

The economy has handed us a wonderful opportunity to find a deal of a lifetime.  I bought mine, in wonderful shape but needing tinkering, for over $50K under wholesale.  I thought I was smart, until I bragged to a guy that got a nicer unit than mine for nearly half what I paid.  Repos are cheap.   CHEAP.  And, if you have good credit, the interest rates are low enough you will pay much less than rent on a comparable apartment.

I would marry my second wife again before I bought a burned one.  You really have to know her to understand the depth of that statement.  ;*)
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