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Author Topic: U-haul converted to horse trailer, now converting to a motorhome.  (Read 4832 times)

Muletruck

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Ok, I came upon a very unique and well kept U-haul truck, F600 1973, almost 30 feet long. It was used for a trail riding business in Washington so it was forever dubbed the "Muletruck". It already had insulation in between the aluminum joists in the ceiling, but the warm air still condenses above the plywood and then drips down soiling the plywood. I've recently come upon enough recycled tongue and groove cedar to do the entire interior of the box with with it. First though, Im ripping off all the thin plywood, and am going to not only insulate between all the studs, walls included, but also to put full 4'X8' sheets of rigid insulation against the studs, and then finally the cedar on top of all that. Now then since I'm going to go through all the effort of putting in cedar, I want to stop all condensation, and possible mold. I was thinking of first using a roll of thick poly, as often in construction, and putting that against all the studs, then putting the insulation against the poly, and then use stainless steel self tapping screws to hold the cedar to the studs, and of course the insulation. I've come here to make sure I'm on the best course possible.
One thing that I probably won't be changing is the 7 windows that are for horse trailers, and are only single panes. As well, I have 3 rv skylights and a chimney from the cookstove to work around. As well, I currently live in my truck full time, rented out my bedroom and am working as a carpenter.
Your thoughts would be appreciated.

Joshua

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: U-haul converted to horse trailer, now converting to a motorhome.
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2011, 06:56:42 AM »
Looks like quite a project!

Condensation is hard to stop in RVs. The ribs are close to the skin and so conduct heat in both directions. There are chilly exterior walls everywhere, and the windows and skylights are more prime sites for condensation and heat gain/loss. Plus propane cooking and people breathing is a small area puts a lot of moisture into the air and it has to go somewhere.  You have the right idea, but don't be surprised if it is less than 100% effective. Even the top of the line RVs suffer from it.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Muletruck

  • Posts: 2
Re: U-haul converted to horse trailer, now converting to a motorhome.
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2011, 09:34:05 AM »
Thanks Gary. I understand that the windows and skylights will always condense. It's just around my cook stove's chimney that is so annoying because the water drips down, soaks into the fire caulking in the cast iron plates, and then when I fire it up again the moisture explodes the caulking, as well as rusting the top of the stove all over again. The problem is that the insulated chimney piece that goes through the roof is only 1 inch thick all the way around, and so the outside still gets hot, so I don't want to be putting poly to close. Possibly use a metal shield? If I can make one. I don't currently have a picture of it installed. Otherwise I'm glad I'm on the right track, since I want to begin very soon with the interior.

4ducksrus

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Re: U-haul converted to horse trailer, now converting to a motorhome.
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2011, 09:43:53 AM »
What a beautiful stove!  I'd love to have that in my motorhome or my house for that matter!  Good luck on your project, Please post before and after pictures!
Jim & Mikie

2011 Itasca Meridian 40U
2013 Jeep Rubicon
2003 HD Ultra Classic
WIT WI54011

PancakeBill

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Re: U-haul converted to horse trailer, now converting to a motorhome.
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2011, 09:52:18 AM »
Drill holes into the ribs, I am assuming they are C shaped?  Then use 'great stuff to insulate the inside of the channel. 
Just being air space it will convect cold and create condensation. 
Bill & Jolene W & Koda

Old Faithful, Yellowstone Association Bookstore
1997 Southwind 35P
Toads: 1997 Honda Accord & 1986 Westfalia
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