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Author Topic: accessibility in campgrounds  (Read 2578 times)

ochidoc

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accessibility in campgrounds
« on: May 15, 2011, 02:57:47 PM »
Back again for more info!  You all are the greatest~ I am completely addicted to this forum already!    Hope you dont get fed up with my endless questioning.

We have decided on the class A.  Found a slightly older coach, with slightly less mileage, that was NOT a rental, and was in much better condition ... thanks for all the advice on that one.. Hoping to take delivery next week.

Now.... We are completely new at this.  Going to take a few short trips before the cross country jaunt this summer.  We will, however be travelling with my young daughter who uses a wheelchair.   She can walk with assistance for short distances, but for anything too extensive, she needs the chair.  We have room to stow the chair under the coach, so thats not an issue. But once we get to a campsite, how accessible are they?  Are there traditionally paved walkways, or is it mostly dirt paths?  The usual distance from a campsite to a shower area/ pool is... ????  Obviously I realize that all camps are different, but is there a "typical" campsite layout?  Do I need to bring along her pink Powerwheel Barbie Motorized vehicle to get around?? Is there something I should request when making a reservation?   Ordinarilly we really dont need to make many accomodations for her limited mobility, but want to be prepared for what we may encounter on the road!

Thanks

 

Conquest aka Robert

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  • 1996 gulfstream conquest ultra 102
Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 03:19:32 PM »
Your best bet is to find CC with online maps and maybe some pics. Then you can decide if you will be close to what you need and also what kind of paths they use. A lot of the one's we have used had gravel roads. How ever our favorite has blacktop roads thru the whole CC. When you call to make reservation ask if they are ADA compliant. I would bring both modes of transport for her just in case it would be better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. 8)
1996 GulfStream Conquest Ultra 102  04-19-2011.
2009 Honda Ruckus
1984 Southwind for 6 years.
1 Wife
6 Children who needs pets

donn

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2011, 03:22:09 PM »
You will find all of the above in one form or another.  Depending where you camp.  National Forest camp grounds will have less pavement that say a full service resort.  When making reservations ask about handicapped sites.  I assume you have a handicap pass for your daughter?  So that should give you priority.  Also you can get a discount pass from the Forest service for federal camping areas.  It gives you half price camping and well worth the time to get it.

DearMissMermaid

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2011, 03:41:57 PM »
I stayed in oodles of campgrounds last year. Every one I was in, had designated handicapped camping spots. One campground I was in,  had every picnic table designed to accommodate a wheelchair, not just the handicapped spot.

But not all campgrounds have paved roads, or paved camping lots, so this could be an issue.  I would definitely take the wheel chair and the scooter.  You may want to have a waterproof cover for the scooter, so that when camping, you can park it on the patio and not worry if a rain shower comes along.

There is not a "typical campsite" layout.  Generally the utilities are on the driver's side and the outdoor patio or lawn area is on the right side, having said that, I've run into campgrounds that had their utilities scattered around or were at the rear of the camping lot.

Most campgrounds will not rent the handicapped spots until the rest of the campground is full, then they let anyone have them. I've been assigned the handicapped spots before, because I was the last to show up without a reservation.

If you know where you are going, you can just call the campground ahead of time to ask questions. However, not all government owned campgrounds answer their phones and for some, the person answering is not even in the campground.  In that case you just do tons of internet sleuthing to find more details.

I hope you have a wonderful time on your travels!  A few weekend trips close to home will give you time to sort out the logistics, but I think you will be happier with both the wheel chair and the scooter as options.
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

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Marsha/CA

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2011, 04:19:53 PM »
Quote
Found a slightly older coach, with slightly less mileage, that was NOT a rental, and was in much better condition ... thanks for all the advice on that one.. Hoping to take delivery next week.

Glad you found one you like.  Be sure and get the check list in our library to go over the new to you RV before you sign any papers.  Also, be sure to check out the age of the tires.  Lots of folks think that if they look good, with even tread and no wear, they are fine no matter how old.  But that is not the case.  Also in the library is a way to check DOT code which will give you the date of manufacture of the tires.  Let us know if you can't find either of those articles.

I'm like the others; be sure and check for a "handicapped" campsite.  I've been all over the US and Canada and usually the campgrounds have specific sites set aside.  You and your family are going to have a great time......Have fun! 

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

tonyandkaren

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2011, 09:37:31 PM »
 My husband and I have been fulltime RVing since 1993. I've used a wheelchair most of that time and what you'll find in campgrounds is about the same as what you find in the rest of the world - accessibility is not very standard even though it's supposed to be. Ask for the handicapped site. Some are wonderfully done , some are pathetic. Most are close to the bathroom. If the roads are dirt or gravel ,there should be a paved path to the restrooms. There should be pavement around the picnic table. The table should have a long overhang on one end so that a wheelchair fits under it. The fire pit should have high sides. The RV parking pad should be level and large enough so that a wheelchair lift in use will still be on the pad with room to maneuver off of it.

  Most of the sites are okay even if they don't fit all of the criteria but we've found some that are very unlevel without good paths to the restrooms and restroom doors that are too heavy among other things.

  I've started a blog about accessibility at places that we visit. The link is at the bottom of my post. Maybe some of the information will be helpful.

Conquest aka Robert

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  • Posts: 614
  • 1996 gulfstream conquest ultra 102
Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2011, 10:35:54 PM »
tonyandkaren; LOVE the blog you tell it like it is.

ochidoc: You are doing the right thing asking questions I would defenitly check out the blog tonyandkaren have and look for more this would give you the best insight.
1996 GulfStream Conquest Ultra 102  04-19-2011.
2009 Honda Ruckus
1984 Southwind for 6 years.
1 Wife
6 Children who needs pets

ArdraF

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2011, 11:04:17 PM »
I agree with the others.  There is no such thing as a typical campground or typical campsite.  Most seem to have handicapped sites and generally they're near the restrooms, but the similarity ends there.  Based on trails and paths I've seen, the motorized version will be very helpful but it won't go everywhere either.  About two years ago we were in Arches National Park (Utah) at the Windows area.  We talked with an older couple whose seriously handicapped daughter was in a wheelchair.  Going to the Windows is a nice path, but it has steps and is not designed for wheelchairs.  They were carrying the girl in the wheelchair up and down the steps and across from one Window to the other.  They must have been totally exhausted, but felt it was worth it because their daughter was having a wonderful time.  They said they had not seen her smile so much in a long time.  The very nature of a place like Arches makes accessibility virtually impossible.  I think they do the best they can, but reality makes it difficult.

ArdraF
ArdraF
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Terier

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2011, 11:22:22 PM »
  I've started a blog about accessibility at places that we visit. The link is at the bottom of my post. Maybe some of the information will be helpful.

What a great blog!  I have it bookmarked.  Thanks for sharing.
2011 Forest River Salem 20RXBL
Perfect for "Living within my means" & camping for one
2011 Toyota Tundra 4.6 V8

ochidoc

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Re: accessibility in campgrounds
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2011, 11:38:15 PM »
TonyandKaren,

the blog is wonderful ! Thanks.... so much good information there!

 

   


 

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