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Author Topic: Gas and Diesel in Germany  (Read 2873 times)

Mike (ex-f-221)

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Gas and Diesel in Germany
« on: May 23, 2011, 03:41:03 PM »
Hi everyone,
 
those who get wet eyes at the pump here is an information from Germany that should wipe away your tears.
 
Gas: US$ 8,07/gal
Diesel: US$ 7,13/gal

Remark: Prices and exchange rate from 5/23 2011
 


The news today (software-translated):
"Only five companies dominate the petrol market in Germany. The consumer pays therefore more for gasoline than needed, says a new study of the Federal Cartel Office.
Driver in Germany are dealing shell, Jet, Esso, BP, total, namely Aral, according to the Federal Cartel Office in the business of filling station with a dominant group of fewer companies. This small circle of providers can control about 70 percent of fuel sales.
"We have the working hypothesis of an oligopoly already for a long time," said Kartellamt spokesman Kay Weidner on Sunday of the dpa News Agency and confirmed that a report of the "image on Sunday". The results of a study of the competition authorities stressed, "that it is to such an and thus just to market structures, which are detrimental to competition".
This is not the method of pricing of the companies. "We have never dealt with the suspicion of possible price fixing, which is a different site," said Weidner. "It is the market structures, and because one must look at what you can do and whether you can do what."
Mike Muellner
Bremerhaven, Germany

carson

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2011, 05:43:00 PM »
Mike, we appreciate your input to this forum. Sure keeps us aware of the World situation regarding our common concerns....fuel prices.

   How else would we, the fuel users, know the real problem.

Carson

Carson, 
 West Central Florida
Ex RV'er. (1995 Winnebago Adventurer)
2007 Buick Rendezvous, SUV / CROSSOVER

...Logic works like a charm...

AlanT

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2011, 02:24:09 PM »
Hi All

The price of diesel in europe has been the highest in the UK for quite some time now this is due to the obscene amount of tax applied.

Using todays exchange rate the cost of a gallon of diesel in the UK is between 10.12 and 10.90 dollars.

So from 10.90 a gallon there will be 6.32 dollars TAX!


Alan


Tom

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2011, 06:21:37 PM »
Alan, is that an imperial gallon or a US gallon? Either way, it makes a big hole in the wallet!

Edit: That's imperial gallons, using the AA June fuel price report 139.34p/litre, 4.55 litres=1 imperial gallon, and an exchange rate of 1 = $1.60 (close enough). A US gallon would cost $8.44, which sounds much cheaper  ;D
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 06:52:46 PM by Tom »
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

gwcowgill

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2011, 06:28:08 PM »
Note how much cheaper diesel is compared to gasoline. Tax in the US has pushed diesel higher than gasoline yet diesel is much cheaper to produce plus you are subsidizing those who use heating oil for heat.
2009 Bounder 36B, 2014 Honda CR-V, various grandchildren when school is out. KG4LHS
2014 Honda CRV Toad,
2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Toad

AlanT

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2011, 02:13:52 AM »
Alan, is that an imperial gallon or a US gallon? Either way, it makes a big hole in the wallet!

Edit: That's imperial gallons, using the AA June fuel price report 139.34p/litre, 4.55 litres=1 imperial gallon, and an exchange rate of 1 = $1.60 (close enough). A US gallon would cost $8.44, which sounds much cheaper  ;D

Hi Tom

I always wondered why people with the same rig as me in the USA were only getting 8 mpg when I easily get 10 mpg just thought they had a heavy right foot I forgot about US gallon. ;D


Alan

Tom

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2011, 06:47:25 AM »
Did I mention that US miles are different from imperial miles? It requires some elementary geometry and a little-known statistic to figure it out:

Because we drive on the right side of the road, every time we go around a right turn or a curve to the right, we're essentially on the 'inside track' and therefore travel less distance than people who drive on the left. The opposite is true for left turns. So, you'd think that would even out, but on average we have more right turns per mile.

Nah, just kidding  ;D
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

carrera57

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2011, 09:36:41 AM »
It's no wonder that most RV's in Europe are based on the Mercedes Turbo Diesel which gets about 15-16 MPG. You rarely see gasoline powered RV's on Europe's streets. Nowadays also lots of car manufacturers sell more Turbo Diesel cars in Europe than gasoline powered cars (even the smallest ones with only 1.0 liter engines are available with turbo diesel engines) and they make great MPG like 40 - 50 on average.

I really don't see any reason why here in the US diesel is sold more expensive than gasoline. The RV industry and RV drivers should start a petition to change this.

Reto

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Gas and Diesel in Germany
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2011, 10:20:07 AM »
The US gov't is partial to gas for some unknown reason. They pressure the oil companies to keep unleaded regular gas prices low and the supply steady, but have never encouraged diesel production or passenger cars with diesel engines. RVs and light trucks have dragged the oil companies and fuel stations into supplying diesel - there has been no push form the other end.

I suspect it goes back to the GM diesel fiasco of the 70's, when GM attempted to make a cheap diesel engine from a gas engine bloc and it broke down all the time. Diesels got a bad name then, plus many of the older generation of drivers think of diesels only as "stink pots" with poor acceleration.  That is changing as more people see and use the many diesel pick-ups and now large RVs, but it will be awhile before the gov't (state and local) get onboard.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

 

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