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Author Topic: Tattoos  (Read 2799 times)

Oldgator73

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  • Posts: 1322
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #120 on: January 07, 2019, 09:45:14 AM »
I never got one for all the memorable times.  Just saying I don't regret the "Triumph" for that reason.  I've reached the stage where I'll probably not get another one, but you never know.

As far as self checkout...I don't  use it.  I hardly ever go to a store with self checkout for just a couple of items, and wouldn't want to deal with $200 worth of groceries at self checkout.  Not to mention the whole 'putting a clerk out of a job' thing.

Iím not gonna go into the put the cashier out of a job thing since there are so many industries that have put somebody out of work but created thousands of jobs for others. Retraining needs to be in some folks vocabulary. As for using self checkouts, we do so whenever we can. At Samís you just pull another cart up and when you scan ( you actually donít scan, you use a scanner; gun) an item simply transfer to the new cart. Easy peasy.
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier
1952 Wife
Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

Lowell

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  • Posts: 2087
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #121 on: January 07, 2019, 10:07:42 AM »
I don't personally like tattoos, but the sweetest 20 something person I know has tattoos. She couldn't be nicer or more reliable.
Lowell

2005 Cherokee28A TT
pulled by 2009 Dodge 1500 Crew Cab 4X4
KF7YET

Tempe, Arizona

kp1xx1

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  • Posts: 13
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #122 on: January 07, 2019, 11:28:01 AM »
A few years ago I had a neighbor who drank beer like it was water.  He was famous for attempting to cool off debates after a day of (him) drinking by repeating his favorite saying "It's America - be free!"  As funny as it was considering his state of sobriety, I use it all the time in complete seriousness.

I saw a few comments in this thread about tattoos and how they do (or do not) tell you what you need to know about someone.  Some went on to further describe how this further applies to the professional world.  I manage a team of professionals (18 people, $2.5M in annual salary payroll). I mention the amount to give you all an idea of the level of work these people do. Hands down, one of my best engineers has full sleeve tattoos.  He keeps them covered in the office (as I believe he should).  I only know he has them because of BBQs and similar activities that take place after hours or on weekends when we occasionally get together as a group.  When I compare him to any of my employees there is nothing about him that is different than others that I could possibly even try to attribute to his tattoos.

I worked with another individual for years at a previous company.  He was a very polished and well rounded individual, and in fact was the manager of HR for that very large company.  On my last day working there I found out he too had essentially his entire upper body tattooed (he performed my exit interview in a short sleeved shirt).  I was completely surprised and never suspected it.

The last sentences in the two paragraphs represent for me what I believe is true about tattoos.  They have zero bearing on the "quality" of a person.  Good people have tattoos, bad people have tattoos, and so does everyone in between.

Lastly, I am not biased - I have zero tattoos.

Drifterrider

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  • Posts: 126
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #123 on: January 07, 2019, 11:51:42 AM »
I never understood the "tramp stamp" thing.  Getting a tattoo that YOU can't see is like buying a painting to put in the attic.

I think a lot of people do it because "it is the in thing".  I'm much too cheap for that.  :)


Bill N

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  • Posts: 2425
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #124 on: January 07, 2019, 01:45:40 PM »
Iím not gonna go into the put the cashier out of a job thing since there are so many industries that have put somebody out of work but created thousands of jobs for others. Retraining needs to be in some folks vocabulary. As for using self checkouts, we do so whenever we can. At Samís you just pull another cart up and when you scan ( you actually donít scan, you use a scanner; gun) an item simply transfer to the new cart. Easy peasy.
Wanna get even easier. Sams also has a Scan & Go app where you can scan each product as you take if off the shelf and then pay online by card and walk out the door showing your phone receipt to the door checker.  I haven't had the guts to try it yet but I have loaded the app. Friend says it works very easy.

Bill
Bill & Joan N in Missouri
USAF (Ret - 1961-1981)
2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35U
Workhorse W22, 8.1L Chevy V8
2013 Chevy Sonic Toad
Furbearers:  Heidi-17(Forever), Cats: Grace-11.5 & Squeak-6.5, Winnie the ShihTzu - 20 mos

Oldgator73

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  • Posts: 1322
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #125 on: January 07, 2019, 02:02:28 PM »
Wanna get even easier. Sams also has a Scan & Go app where you can scan each product as you take if off the shelf and then pay online by card and walk out the door showing your phone receipt to the door checker.  I haven't had the guts to try it yet but I have loaded the app. Friend says it works very easy.

Bill

I have heard some stores give you s scanner when you enter. I think you scan you CC and itís charged each time you scan an item. Bring your own bags and walk out when your done.
Retired Air Force
Retired DoD Chief, Education & Training
2016 Winnie Drop
2016 Nissan Frontier
1952 Wife
Do you know the difference between Education and Training: Would you rather your daughter take sex Education or sex Training?

signcut

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  • Posts: 128
Re: Tattoos
« Reply #126 on: Today at 09:45:02 AM »
Currently, tattoos are an 'in thing', so you see a lot of them. When people, especially young people, are doing something that is 'in', they will make sure that it can and will be seen. Everyone has done something along those lines before, but some of the newer 'in things' are more permanent than those awful bell bottoms, for instance, that I hated even in the 60s and 70s. Nowadays, tattoos and modifications are all the rage; I expect that many folks now sporting them will regret it later, but that's just a guess.

I have 4 tattoos, and while 2 are covered, the others are not especially noticeable, although they can be see; they are on the inside of my forearms, where they don't stand out as much. All of my tattoos were done for a specific reason, for a specific time in my life, and all have a specific meaning to me. My first was my best, and has held up incredibly well, being as it is now almost 40 years old. I don't regret any of them, because I thought long and hard about it before getting them. That was the best advice that I got regarding tattoos, from the guy who did my first one; 'think about it for at least 6 months, and if you still want it then as much as you do now, we'll get it done'. The tattoos that I think are, or will be, most regretted are the ones that really don't/didn't mean anything, other than something to do to try to be cool, unless they're top notch work that can be seen as art by the person who is wearing it. 

I've told my kids that who you are is more important than what you are. You may be rich or poor, gay or straight, loud or subdued, whatever, but who you are inside will always be more important that what you are outside. As a believer, I would say the outside is what man knows, the inside is what God knows; I have no doubt which matters more...
"Man is the only animal that blushes... or needs to." - Mark Twain